15 Slices
Medium 9781591200994

1. The Benefits of Exercise and Sports Participation for Kids

Antonio Ph.D., Jose Basic Health Publications ePub

A

ny child in America today who decides to participate in sports usually does so for one simple reason: fun. Now, if only the decision was that elementary for parents, who are often unsure of the impact that exercise and sports may have on their childs physical development and academic achievement. Fortunately for parents, as research can attest, exercise and sports offer tremendous opportunities for social relationships, physical challenges, and honest competition. There is even evidence that sports can increase a childs self-esteem and academic performance, while decreasing the likelihood of disease and drug use.1 Then again, to a child, all of these attributes equal just one desirable characteristic: fun.

Participating in sports and exercise promotes a positive attitude toward activity that will likely continue into adulthood.

Athletic participation and training for sports can provide a myriad of benefits that few other activities offer. But the burden of responsibility has increased for parents. We live in a lazy society and for many kids the word sports means playing video games. Today, leisure time for children is significantly less devoted to rigorous activities. The hardest part is just getting them to start exercising. On the bright side, research has also shown that participating in sports and exercise at a young age promotes a positive attitude toward activity that will likely continue into adulthood.

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6. Special Nutritional Needs During Exercise

Antonio Ph.D., Jose Basic Health Publications ePub

Y

our child does not have to be a professional athlete to take advantage of proper pre- and postexercise nutrition, and to do so does not require a nutritionist. Most kids and adolescents have only a fleeting notion of the importance of food, especially when it comes to its impact on exercise and sports. Well, its about time for that to change. The fundamentals are simple and, once the extraordinary benefits are realized, success will become your childs own motivation to continue.

PRE-EXERCISE NUTRITION

What should your child eat before exercise? We suggest that a meal should be consumed two to three hours before a game or match. Preferably, this meal should contain unprocessed carbohydrates (vegetables and unrefined starches such as oats or brown rice), lean meats (chicken without the skin), and copious amounts of water. It is important as well that your child choose foods that he or she is accustomed tothis is no time to experiment with new food choices. How much your child consumes depends on body weight and age. We do suggest that your child stay away from fatty foods since these take a long time to digest. Plus, your child should consume simple carbohydrates (such as sports drinks) ten minutes or less before the match and keep consuming them throughout the game, when possible.

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2 ► JavaFit—The World's First Functional Gourmet Coffee

Antonio Ph.D., Jose Basic Health Publications ePub

2

JavaFit—The World’s First Functional Gourmet Coffee

Tired of taking countless pills? If you open up your kitchen cabinet, you probably have calcium pills, vitamin tablets, and assorted other capsules. Then there are the various diet pills that require you to take six King Kong–sized capsules throughout the day. Who needs all that?

If you don’t mind taking pills, you can skip this lecture. But if you’re among the millions of Americans who want to get some of these nutrients without worrying about whether you took your pills, then here’s your solution.

What if you could get the benefits of dietary supplements without changing a single behavior? In other words, you would not have to swallow extra pills, buy newfangled exercise equipment from a hyperactive spokesman on a late-night infomercial, or decipher complicated directions on the back of a label to figure out how to use it. Imagine, instead, brewing your normal cup of coffee in the morning, smelling the glorious aroma, and drinking a liquid brew that is chock full of nutrients. Sound good? Well, it’s now a reality.

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2. Simple Rules of Exercise for Kids

Antonio Ph.D., Jose Basic Health Publications ePub

R

esearch shows that it is safe for children to lift weights and exercise. It will not, as rumored, stunt their growth, break their bones, fill them with rage, or abruptly and profoundly drop their IQ. A child who lifts weights can still take part in intellectual pursuits, finish his or her homework, or become a computer whiz. And weight training and working out may actually help improve performance in these areas. No, not in a bigger biceps will make them a stronger artist sort of wayrather, pumping iron and becoming fit can do wonders for a childs self-esteem and confidence, and it will add to their energy reserves and motivation, not detract from them. Plus, stronger muscles can make a child a better athlete.

So, lets get something straight right from the get-go: weight lifting, when done correctly, is not dangerous. In fact, its quite healthy and has been shown to reduce the prevalence of injury, both in the weight room and out on the field of play.1 Do not surrender yourself to the myth that lifting weights is dangerous for your children, regardless of what many conventional doctors may claim. Studies have repeatedly shown that poor technique and lifting habits lead to injury, whether youre nine or thirty-nine.2 Proper exercise training can set your kid off on the right foot for a lifetime of growth (inner and outer) and achievement.

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6 ► The Javalution Nutrition Program

Antonio Ph.D., Jose Basic Health Publications ePub

6

The Javalution Nutrition Program

Over the last two decades, American eating habits have gone from bad to deadly. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), more than 65 percent of all American adults are overweight. Even scarier, more than 35 percent of American adults exceed their ideal weight by at least 20 percent, earning them the dubious distinction of being “obese.” How do these figures translate in terms of our health as a nation? To put it simply, nearly two-thirds of Americans are at increased risk of developing high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and arthritis as a direct result of their weight. Many of these same individuals will also encounter job discrimination and social rejection, suffer from low self-esteem and depression, and die prematurely. The “human” cost of this ongoing tragedy may be incalculable, but the fiscal impact it is having on our healthcare system is unmistakably clear. If something doesn’t change—and soon—the American lifestyle will bankrupt the American people.

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