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17. Desert Manufacturer

Anna Kaziunas France Maker Media, Inc ePub

Markus Kayser’s sand and sun 3D printer.

Laura Kiniry

Think that deserts lack resources? Not to Markus Kayser. The MIT research assistant with a master’s in product design has created a 3D printer that can make glass objects using a desert’s two most abundant resources: sun and sand. “I began asking myself,” says Kayser, “what if I could build a machine which would act as a kind of translator between the two?” His Solar Sinter (Figure 17-1) is the direct result.

Based on a type of 3D printing known as selective laser sintering (SLS), Kayser’s Solar Sinter uses the sun’s rays as a laser and sand rather than resins to create exact physical replicas of his digital designs. The printer includes a large Fresnel lens that’s always facing the sun (by way of an electronic sun-tracking device), stepper motors to move and load its sandbox, and two 60-watt photovoltaic panels that provide electricity to charge the battery that drives the motors and electronics of the machine.

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18. How I Printed a Humanoid

Anna Kaziunas France Maker Media, Inc ePub

Michael Overstreet

In recent years I’ve experimented with 3D printing the structural brackets for my humanoid robot Boomer (Figure 18-1). Boomer and I compete at RoboGames and show off at Maker Faires, and people always ask me: Why 3D printing? Why not just make the brackets out of metal like everyone else?

I started to do it just because I could. The advent of cheap DIY 3D printers has given makers a new way to manufacture and customize objects, and I was simply exploring this new process. As I printed more parts for my robot, I realized that it could be done—and done cheaply.

Then I saw the DARwIn-OP at the 2010 International Conference on Humanoid Robots. After seeing how capable and groundbreaking it was, I wanted one. But how could I afford it? A new DARwIn-OP from Robotis costs $12,000.

The DARwIn-OP (Dynamic Anthropomorphic Robot with Intelligence—Open Platform) is a state-of-the-art research and development humanoid robot created by Virginia Tech’s Robotics and Mechanisms Laboratory (RoMeLa), led by Dr. Dennis Hong, in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, and the South Korean company Robotis, with support from the National Science Foundation.

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18. How I Printed a Humanoid

Anna Kaziunas France Maker Media, Inc ePub

Michael Overstreet

In recent years I’ve experimented with 3D printing the structural brackets for my humanoid robot Boomer (Figure 18-1). Boomer and I compete at RoboGames and show off at Maker Faires, and people always ask me: Why 3D printing? Why not just make the brackets out of metal like everyone else?

I started to do it just because I could. The advent of cheap DIY 3D printers has given makers a new way to manufacture and customize objects, and I was simply exploring this new process. As I printed more parts for my robot, I realized that it could be done—and done cheaply.

Then I saw the DARwIn-OP at the 2010 International Conference on Humanoid Robots. After seeing how capable and groundbreaking it was, I wanted one. But how could I afford it? A new DARwIn-OP from Robotis costs $12,000.

The DARwIn-OP (Dynamic Anthropomorphic Robot with Intelligence—Open Platform) is a state-of-the-art research and development humanoid robot created by Virginia Tech’s Robotics and Mechanisms Laboratory (RoMeLa), led by Dr. Dennis Hong, in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, and the South Korean company Robotis, with support from the National Science Foundation.

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Medium 9781449338657

5. Meet the MakerBot Replicator 2

Bre Pettis Maker Media, Inc ePub

Wherein the reader is informed of the mechanisms that imbue common and readily available tools and building materials with the raw power of making and imagination.

For many people, the very idea of a MakerBot is still something entirely new-a machine that can make anything still seems like science fiction. As MakerBot and other low-cost printer vendors work to bring 3D printing to the masses, science fiction is becoming everyday fact. Still, only a few people have seen one in person, and even fewer know how they works. Though the underlying engineering principles behind a MakerBot are quite complex, in a nutshell, a MakerBot is a very precise, robotic hot glue gun mounted to a very precise, robotic positioning system. Lets take a look under the hood.

The MakerBot Replicator 2 is a state-of-the-art desktop 3D printer, with capabilities above and beyond the previous generations of MakerBots. It has a huge build platform which gives you the superpower to print things BIG! It has advanced software and improved hardware that makes print resolution finer than ever. Every one was assembled with love in Brooklyn by skilled technicians. Best of all, it was designed with a focus on ease of use so you can have your MakerBot Replicator 2 replicating within minutes of taking it out of the box.

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A. 3D Printing Resources

Anna Kaziunas France Maker Media, Inc ePub

Colleen Jordan, Eric Weinhoffer and the editors of MAKE

Creating things from atoms is better with bits.

Declare to the world your proficiency in the world of 3D printing with this embroidered skill badge from Adafruit.

There are many useful and inexpensive software options for designing 3D models, for printing or otherwise.

http://123dapp.com

This is part of the free 123D suite of tools from Autodesk. You can model objects using its easy-to-learn interface, prepare your models for printing, export them to STL files, or send them directly to many popular fabrication companies. It includes a variety of popular 3D model creation, scanning, and sculpting apps, including the popular 123D Catch and 123D Design.

http://tinkercad.com

Recently rescued by Autodesk, Tinkercad is a web-based modeling program. With a WebGL-enabled browser such as Google Chrome or Firefox, you can run Tinkercad’s 3D user interface directly in your browser. Build up your design, save it online, and share it with others. You can also send files directly to popular 3D printing services or download STL files for printing yourself.

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