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6.4 Implications of survey findings

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CHAPTER 6

ISO 9000 for small construction firms

6.1 Introduction

The application of ISO 9000 Quality Management Systems (QMS) seems to be confined presently to the larger construction firms and not their smaller counterparts. However, many of the smaller firms are employed by large construction firms as their subcontractors. It therefore appears that QMS should also be extended to the smaller construction firms if the long-term objective of developing a construction industry which is capable of producing consistently good quality work is to be achieved (Low, 1995). This chapter presents the findings of a survey which examined the reasons why small construction firms are not receptive to ISO 9000. It also suggests measures to overcome some of the hurdles currently faced by small construction firms when developing and implementing quality management systems within their organisations. Total Quality Management within the construction industry can be achieved only when both large and small contractors have implemented quality management systems in their operations.

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5.3 Quality control department

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CHAPTER 5

A case study of ISO 9000 in large scale projects

5.1 Introduction

Although quality management systems were introduced more than a decade ago in the construction industries of the developed countries (in the United Kingdom, for example), the implementation of quality management systems in some less developed countries is still a relatively new phenomenon.

While quality management systems are now slowly making their presence felt in the less developed countries, there has been a lack of study of the problems faced by practitioners in implementing quality management systems for building projects during their infancy stage in the industry. This vacuum was, likewise, felt in the more developed countries like the United Kingdom when quality management systems were first introduced to their construction industries. This lacuna at the infancy stage means that the lessons and experiences learnt from implementing quality management systems in one particular building project are not necessarily transferred to benefit other projects. Apart from filling this vacuum, the aims of this chapter are to:

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1.5 Conclusion

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CHAPTER 1

Development and implementation of ISO 9000

1.1 Introduction

Formal quality management systems are increasingly recognised worldwide as an essential attribute of any business. The objectives of quality management are to create and sustain management systems that are sound professionally, commercially, operationally and contractually.

In the 1970s, a large number of national standards were developed for quality systems used in the manufacturing, military and nuclear industries. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, formal quality management techniques were applied in many other business sectors including the service industry and professional organisations. The first quality management standards were not drafted for professional services but these still form the basis for all third party assessments in the service industry. The services provided by building professionals such as architects, engineers and quantity surveyors, unlike a product, often cannot be easily set down tangibly. These services and judgements are highly personalised and intangible. Issues change from time to time and very often there is no single way or an absolute answer to a set of problems, which cannot simply be reduced to pre-planned checklists and routines.

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7.10 Implementation of the proposed quality cost system on site

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CHAPTER 7

A system for quantifying construction quality costs

7.1 Introduction

There are three components that make up quality costs: Prevention, Appraisal and Failure costs. The ISO 9000 standard introduces a quality management system that has been widely claimed would reduce the costs of business. One of the ways it does this is through a reduction in quality costs. The ISO 9000 quality management system establishes work procedures that reduce defects. Proper design and implementation of these work procedures lead to reduced wastage as more work would be done right the first time. Ultimately, the costs of operation would decrease. However, no study has been done based on the above premise. Although it has been widely claimed that ISO 9000 would reduce the costs of doing business, no studies have been undertaken within the context of ISO 9000 certified construction firms. Due to this vacuum, this chapter proposes a cost system to capture site quality costs. The aims of this chapter are to:

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9.1 Overview and future directions

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 9

Conclusion

9.1 Overview and future directions

The ISO 9000 certification is a voluntary, third party quality system registration scheme. It assesses and certifies companies’ quality systems to the relevant parts of the ISO 9000 standards. The benefits associated with certification include:

Many practitioners have traditionally viewed ISO 9000 from a purely technical perspective. While an understanding of the technical requirements of ISO 9000 is critical, this alone will not ensure effective development, implementation and maintenance of quality management systems. Other non-technical issues relating to ISO 9000 must also be addressed. As shown in Figure 9.1, this book is an attempt to address the more pertinent non-technical issues in Chapters 1 to 8 as well as discuss the lessons which can be used to overcome some of the pitfalls encountered. Practitioners should keep these lessons in mind when managing the development, implementation and maintenance of ISO 9000 in the construction industry.

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