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CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX Unintegrated states and the process of integration: a new formulation

Margaret Boyle Spelman Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX

Unintegrated states and the process of integration: a new formulation*

Christopher Reeves

Introduction

In his novel The Go-Between, the author L. P. Hartley (1953) says that the past is a foreign country and that they do things differently there. This paper is based on work spanning more than a decade to define and direct the therapeutic task of a residential unit for severely disturbed children between the ages of five and twelve. The treatment approach and concepts were greatly influenced by the ideas of Winnicott, particularly by the concepts of unintegration, integration, and disintegration, and their bearing on the understanding of the developing child. However, the context of this work is different from Winnicott’s own. He derived his ideas primarily from observation of infants, toddlers, and the analytic treatment of adult psychotics. The world of the

Mulberry Bush School, on the other hand, is peopled by post-toddlers who still display many of the characteristics of feeling, thought, expectation, and reaction, that Winnicott identified as indicators that integration had not been reliably achieved in the infant. In this context, his original concepts took on a new and developed perspective. The struggle of disadvantaged nine- to twelve-year-olds to attain a secure sense of self, to distinguish inward pain from outward projections, and to acquire belief over time in the expectable return of figures out of sight, helped in the reappraisal of the time-scale of the integration process. This is because it occurs in the child with a favourable environment to support it.

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Chapter Eight - A Summary of Winnicott's Thinking Evolving in that of his Analytic “Children”

Margaret Boyle Spelman Karnac Books ePub

Marion Milner

Milner's like-mindedness with Winnicott preceded their acquaintance. Winnicott's implicit theory about theory and influence (also Lovejoy's but not Bloom's) is evident in the fact that they wrote about the same phenomena separately during that time and also afterwards and that in the space between them thinking flourishes and finding/creating are often the same thing. The thinking and not the thinker has primacy so that where there might have been one there was in fact no issue about who owned what ideas. Milner's thinking shows many of the characteristics of Winnicott's thinking with the exception perhaps of making especially economic interventions and Milner's emphasis on personal rather than clinical experience. Broadly one could say that Winnicott's eleven themes were also hers and like him she is very much her “true self”, taking responsibility for conflicts within, bridge-building and communicating. In her unique contribution she confirms the links in Winnicott's thinking to visuo-spatial imagination, the thinking of Jung, Piaget, Daoism, organisational theory, art theory and art therapy, visualisation and progressive muscle relaxation techniques, Eastern and Western religious and spiritual traditions, English literature, and Greek mythology.

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CHAPTER EIGHT A measure of agreement: an exploration of the relationship of Winnicott and Phyllis Greenacre

Margaret Boyle Spelman Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER EIGHT

A measure of agreement: an exploration of the relationship of Winnicott and Phyllis Greenacre*

Nellie L. Thompson

T

his paper investigates hitherto unexplored connections between Winnicott and Phyllis

Greenacre (1894–1989). I first became aware of their relationship while reading Winnicott’s paper “The use of an object and relating through identifications” published after his death in Playing and Reality (Winnicott, 1971). The earliest version of this paper, simply titled “The use of an object”, was presented to a scientific meeting of the New York Psychoanalytic Society on

12 November 1968, the proceedings of which have become mired in myth and controversy. The paper evoked respectful but deeply perplexed reactions from the three discussants: Samuel

Ritvo, a prominent child and adolescent analyst, Bernard Fine, a training analyst, and Edith

Jacobson, author of The Self, the Object and the Outside World (1964).

A report by David Milrod admirably conveys how the evening’s participants understood

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CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR Maternal form in artistic creation

Margaret Boyle Spelman Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR

Maternal form in artistic creation

Kenneth Wright

The promise of happiness is felt in the act of creation but disappears towards the completion of the work. For it is then that the painter realises it is only a picture he is painting. Until then he had almost dared to hope that the picture might spring to life.

—Lucien Freud, 2012

Introduction

In this paper, I assume the existence of a core that is common to all the creative arts and I take poetry-writing as a paradigm of artistic creation. In addition I make three further assumptions: first, that an art work is a special kind of object with the potential to communicate artistic import or significance; second, that the artistic process necessarily involves the transformation of a medium’s basic materials into forms which carry this significance; and third, that the apprehension of an object’s artistic import necessitates the adoption of a certain posture, or aesthetic stance. This stance requires that practical concerns be laid aside—it involves a psychological move from the action domain to one of non-doing, or contemplation.

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CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE Two pioneers in the history of infant mental health: Winnicott and Bowlby

Margaret Boyle Spelman Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE

Two pioneers in the history of infant mental health:

Winnicott and Bowlby

Eric Rayner

T

his is an informal talk giving the author’s personal memories and character sketches of two pioneers of infant mental health. It attempts to describe something of the nature of their very different forms of greatness.

I have very little claim to speak to you, I am only an adult psychoanalyst, from London, with no expertise in infant or family work. But from nearly forty years ago I did know both Donald

Winnicott and John Bowlby. I did not work intimately with them much but had many personal encounters with both, so that I still have their particular rhythms buzzing inside me. I am going to draw on these to say something about their characters as I saw them. Both were English gentlemen who, unusually, devoted their lives to mothers and children. But in some ways they were as different as chalk and cheese, and this may have shaped their remarkable contributions to infant mental health.

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