14 Slices
Medium 9781607052708

Crossroads

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Amy Walsh, 84″ × 84″

After green, blue is definitely my favorite color. An old project I started in a design class inspired me to use this collection of batiks, all of which are blue or relatives of blue. I love the way these fabrics go together. Finishing this quilt made me want to try it in other analogous palettes.

FINISHED BLOCK: 6″ × 6″

FINISHED QUILT: 84″ × 84″

The following yardage makes a queen-size quilt. Refer to the Crossroads chart (page 41) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted blue and green batiks: 40 strips 6½″ × 42″ or 7½ yards total or 33 fat quarters

Backing: 8 yards

Binding: ¾ yard

Batting: 94″ × 94″

TIP

I used more than 40 different fabrics in the Crossroads quilt to get the look and texture that I wanted. The more fabrics, the better! Dig into your stash to find your most interesting batiks. If you are lacking, ask a quilting friend—or better yet, go shopping!

Crossroads is made up of 3 different blocks. You can make subtle changes to the look of this quilt by altering the number of each block you include. We made an equal number of all 3 blocks, interspersing them randomly throughout the quilt.

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Medium 9781607052708

Club Noir

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Janine Burke, 54″ × 72″

FINISHED BLOCK: 12″ × 6″

FINISHED QUILT: 54″ × 72″

I’ve long been intrigued by the dichotomy of nightclubs-dark and sensual, yet loud and lively. This color palette was chosen to reflect that atmosphere: mysterious yet bright.

The following yardage makes a twin-size quilt. Refer to the Club Noir chart (page 58) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted solids: 18 strips 9″ × 42″ or 4¾ yards total or 20 fat quarters

Binding: ½ yard

Backing: 3¾ yards

Batting: 64″ × 82″

We have included cutting instructions for both 42″strips as well as fat quarters.

TIP

Cut up just 2 contrasting solids to begin with so that you can construct a test block. This way you can verify the accuracy of your pieces and you can see how your fabrics are going together.

Cutting from assorted solids

From the assorted solids, cut:

18 strips 9″ × 42″

Cut each 9″ strip into:

1 strip 4½″ × 42″; subcut into 3 squares 4½″ × 4½″,
3 rectangles 3½″ × 4½″, and 6 rectangles 1½″ × 4½″.

3 strips 1½″ × 42″; subcut each strip into
2 rectangles 1½″ × 12½″ and 3 rectangles 1½″ × 4½″.

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Medium 9781607052708

Snaps

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Amy Walsh, 75″ × 91″

FINISHED BLOCK: 5″ × 7″

FINISHED QUILT: 75″ × 91″

My grandmother, who taught me how to sew, loved to eat licorice—especially snaps, which we would buy for her in a cellophane bag from Walgreens. I always loved the bright colors of these little candies—which inspired me to make this quilt—but did not appreciate their taste until I was an adult. Because I’m such a fan of squares, I love altering the Square-in-a-Square block to achieve different looks. Here, alternating a variation of this pattern with black solid yields a striking contemporary quilt.

The following yardage makes a twin-size quilt. Refer to the Snaps chart (page 22) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted bright solids: 25 strips 5½″ × 42″ or 4 yards total

Solid black: 3½ yards for block centers and alternate blocks

Binding: ¾ yard

Backing: 5¾ yards

Batting: 85″ × 101″

TIP

To get the color variation that I wanted, I used 24 different solids in my version of Snaps. I made quite a few extra blocks so that I would have a lot of options when putting the quilt together.

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Medium 9781607052708

Too Flat

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Janine Burke, 81″ × 95″

I love the architecture in Chicago. Whether it’s residential or commer-I cial, it appeals to my eye. I am frequently inspired by architecture for patterns, and this one is no exception. Playing on the phrase two-flat in reference to apartment-style living, Too Flat represents the many cozy homes throughout the city and surrounding suburbs.

FINISHED BLOCK: 9″ × 5″

FINISHED QUILT: 81″ × 95″

The following yardage makes a queen-size quilt. Refer to the Too Flat chart (page 49) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted batiks: 43 strips 8″ × 42″ or 43 fat quarters

Binding: ¾ yard

Backing: 7¾ yards

Batting: 91″ × 105″

We have included cutting instructions for both 42″strips as well as fat quarters.

TIP

We encourage you to cut just 2 contrasting batiks to begin with so that you can construct a test block. This way you can verify the accuracy of your pieces and you can see how your fabrics are going together.

Each block is constructed of the following pieces:

1 rectangle 1½″ × 5½″ (Unit A)

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Medium 9781607052708

Union Station

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Janine Burke, 60″ × 82½″

Once upon a time, I used to take the train into Chicago’s Union Station on my way to work in the morning and then back out again at night. The gray rails represent the train tracks (you probably figured that out), while the palette represents the multicolors of the multicultures who pass through Union Station by the thousands every day.

FINISHED SQUARE BLOCK: 7½″ × 7½″

FINISHED RECTANGLE BLOCK: 7½″ × 15″

FINISHED QUILT: 60″ × 82½″

The following yardage makes a throw-size quilt. Refer to the Union Station chart (page 45) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted bright solids: 20 strips 6″ × 42″ or 3½ yards total

Gray: 2½ yards

Batting: 70″ × 92″

Backing: 5¼ yards

Binding: ¾ yard

From each of the assorted bright solids, cut:

20 strips 6″ × 42″

Cut each 6″ strip into:

3 strips 2″ × 42″

From the gray, cut:

40 strips 2″ × 42″

Union Station is constructed by making strata or strip-pieced units. You will make a total of 20 stratas, 1 with each accent color.

Strata of 2 gray strips between 3 accent strips

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