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Chapter 11: “I Think There Is Some Trouble at Hand”

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter 11

“I Think There Is Some

Trouble at Hand”

With the death of Peter Bader, John Baird and Scott Cooley had effectively completed their quest for revenge. Satisfied that justice had been meted out to those responsible for his brother’s murder, Baird began to withdraw from the feud. With him went the allies who had rallied to his cause. The Mason mob was broken, and John Clark had

fled to parts unknown. Baird had a new daughter, Edna, at home and realized that it was time to stop the conflict.1 Satisfied with the results,

Baird began preparations to leave Texas.

Even as Baird withdrew from the conflict, fate closed in on Ernst

Jordan. Since the beginning of the conflict he had gone armed.

Sometime during 1876 when the “troubles had hardly subsided”

Jordan was removing a pistol from his carriage when it slipped from his hand. The pistol dropped to the ground and discharged, the bullet shattering his knee. The accident left him bedridden during the remainder of 1876 and throughout 1877. A surgeon from San Antonio operated on the leg, but it never healed properly and required treatments for the rest of his life.2

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Chapter 23. “Blood will surely come”

David Johnson University Of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER

23

“Blood will surely come”

THE REPUTATION RINGO BROUGHT FROM TEXAS is evident in existing documents. Obviously James Earp was frightened that Ringo would find his brothers. The Epitaph echoed this. “Later in the day two parties are said to have gone in pursuit of the deputy marshal and his posse, threatening vengeance for an act in which the above official was concerned some time since. What the result will be can only be surmised.” The paper attacked Behan’s office for releasing Ringo without an approved bond. “The facts are stubborn and plain, but no more than is the duty of every good citizen to do their utmost to see that the full intent of the proclamation is carried out and that the orders of the court are sustained.”1

The first party was John Ringo. This lone man inspired such concern that the Epitaph called upon residents to protect Earp and his posse. The second party was John Henry Jackson’s posse which was pursuing Ringo. His posse headed for Charleston expecting to find both Ringo and the Earps. Instead they ran into trouble. On January 24 Jackson arrived at Charleston “and after leaving their arms at a convenient place proceeded to the Occidental hotel to get their breakfast. Upon passing the threshold they were intercepted by Isaac Clanton and another man with drawn weapons, while the barrels of other Winchesters suddenly gleamed over the adobe wall. Mr. Jackson stated his errand.”

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Chapter 20. “desperate and dangerous”

David Johnson University Of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER

20

“desperate and dangerous”

THE BRUTAL MURDERS IN GUADALUPE CANYON intensified tensions and racial hatred along the border. Many of the cattlemen in the region hailed from Texas. Border warfare and feuds were nothing new. These men did not care what the government wanted. Friends had been killed, and if the government could not or would not act, they would. It was the savagely biblical law of the feud demanding an eye for an eye.

John Ringo had no intention of attacking the Mexican army, but he may have considered an opportunity for revenge. A. M. Franklin encountered him after the ambush. In 1925 Franklin recalled that L. M. Jacobs & Co., of Tucson, sent him to the San Simon to take charge of a herd of cattle being driven north from Durango and Chihuahua. Franklin arranged for the customs agent at Silver City, New Mexico, to meet him and clear the herd, which was in charge of a man named Jim Sprague.

After the herd reached the San Simon, Sprague, Franklin, and four of the Mexican herders were detailed to take the first watch. Everything was calm until shortly after midnight when the herd stampeded. Franklin tried to outrun the cattle and was finally overtaken by Joe Browning:

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Chapter 19. “the sympathy of the border people seems to be with them”

David Johnson University Of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER

19

“the sympathy of the border people seems to be with them”

ONCE AGAIN, RINGO faced serious charges in Arizona. Newspapers in the territory “were now calling him ‘Ringold’” just as some had in Texas years earlier. One biographer theorizes, “either the person who reported the robbery account to the newspaper knew of Ringo’s Texas past or someone at the newspaper was aware of it.”1 Ringo was better known among the cattlemen of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona. But in the fall of 1881 he was not well known in Tombstone, which he rarely visited. When he was arraigned for the robbery, he was asked if John Ringgold was his true name and he denied it.2 It is hardly likely such an error would have occurred if he was a “crime lord” as suggested.3 Ringo apparently returned to New Mexico after the robbery. Dave Estes was arrested and brought before Justice of the Peace G. W. Ellingsworth for a hearing. The Star reports that Estes “robbed a game of about four hundred dollars” and “confiscated a valuable horse.” The charges were quickly dismissed.

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Chapter 13: “The Gladden Trial”

David Johnson University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter 13

“The Gladden Trial”

As the mob’s attention turned to the Olneys and their family, they were aided, inadvertently or not, by the editor of the Burnet Bulletin.

Dean Swift Ogle made little attempt at remaining impartial. Having the opportunity to sway public opinion, Ogle used it. From the beginning Ogle was a staunch supporter of families who had ties to the mob, such as the Rountrees. When John J. Strickland, sheriff of Burnet

County, appointed another brother-in-law James Martin as deputy to replace his brother, the Bulletin reported: “Mr. James Martin, brother of the deceased S. B. Martin, will take the place of his brother as

Deputy Sheriff. He is a quiet man, sober and discreet, but is cool and brave, which is a characteristic of the family.”1

Martin may have been an excellent choice, but the appointment can hardly have been viewed with any degree of warmth by Olney supporters. Also on Strickland’s payroll was Joseph T. Bozarth, John

J. Bozarth’s brother. The Bozarth brothers had served under L. H.

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