291 Chapters
Medium 9782067181977

EMILIA-ROMAGNA

Michelin Michelin ePub

EMILIA-ROMAGNA

In Emilia-Romagna the pleasure had from food and wine is part of the local culture. There are many delights to be enjoyed: filled handmade pasta following traditional recipes, tasty charcuterie, and cheeses known around the whole world, among others. And of course to accompany these delicacies only wine will do, with those from the region often refreshing, sparkling and easy to drink. The region has fully 20 appellations. Heading towards the sea you come to the vineyards of the Colli Piacentini, followed by the Colli di Parma, then the Colli di Scandiano and the flat lands of Lambrusco (Modena and Reggio). Climbing again you reach the Colli Bolognesi, the Colli di Imola and Faenza, then the Colli di Rimini, and finish your trip in the other areas of Romagna planted to vine.

Hills under vine around Forlì

Fauxware/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

With regard to wine production, there are many differences between Emilia and Romagna. To begin with, in Emilia Barbera, Croatina, Lambrusco and Fortana are some of the black varieties cultivated, while Malvasia di Candia, Montu, Ortrugo, Moscato Giallo, Pignoletto and Sauvignon are among the whites. In Romagna, on the other hand, you find Sangiovese and Montepulciano for the reds, while the whites include Albana, Trebbiano Romagnolo, Chardonnay and Bombino Bianco. In addition, the two areas differ by the fact that in Emilia the wines are predominantly sparkling, whereas they are still in Romagna.

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Medium 9782067181977

SARDINIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

SARDINIA

Sardinia has always been open to commercial and cultural exchange: in consequence, having also been conquered by the Phoenicians, Romans, Spanish and Piedmontese, the island has been strongly marked by the passage of other peoples of the Mediterranean, even in its viticulture. The range of native varieties is enormous and includes Bovale, Cannonau, Carignano, Monica, Girò, Cagnulari, Pascale, Nuragus, Nasco, Seminano, which, with others like Vermentino, Moscato, Malvasia and Vernaccia, are used to produce the region’s most important wines. However, despite this wide assortment, the cultivars that are most representative of Sardinia are essentially two: Vermentino and Cannonau.

The wild coastline of the island of San Pietro

E. Locci/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Sardinian wines are generally of good quality, well structured, fairly alcoholic, full flavoured and complex in terms of taste and smell. The inherent interest of the production zone is heightened by its varied character. Appreciation of the native varieties has always been broad and the island’s traditional wines have never been forgotten or neglected.

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Medium 9782067182042

Port Angeles

Michelin Michelin ePub

Point Defiance Park a

5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma. t 253-305-1000. www.metroparkstacoma.org. Open daily half hour before dawn–half hour after dusk.

At 702 acres, Point Defiance Park is one of the largest city parks in the nation. It has plenty of places to enjoy the out-of-doors, whether hiking through the park’s dense stands of old-growth Douglas-fir forest; watching bald eagles dive for salmon in the tidal rapids below 250ft cliffs; beachcombing at Owen’s Beach or strolling through the rose, dahlia or Japanese gardens. The Point Defiance Zoo and Aquariuma sits near the park’s entrance, and the Fort Nisqually Living History Museumaa is located on a 5mi forested loop drive that offers viewing opportunities of raccoons as they scamper along the road shoulder, and the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and waterway. Outside the park’s entrance is a Washington State Ferries dock for ferries bound for nearby, rural Vashon Island.

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Medium 9782067197558

Central Germany

Michelin Michelin ePub

Central Germany

 Magdeburg

 Wörlitzer Park

 Dessau-Rosslau

 Halle

 Quedlinburg

 Erfurt

 Weimar

 Jena

 Naumburg

 Eisenach

 Kassel

 Fulda

 Marburg

Grüne Zitadelle, Magdeburg

© Fiedler Bernd J / age fotostock

Central Germany

After travelling around Germany’s heartland, it is easy to understand why the country is often called the “land of poets and thinkers”. Martin Luther studied in Erfurt, posted his “95 Theses” in Wittenberg, and translated the Bible from Greek into German at Eisenach’s Wartburg Castle. Nearby Weimar drew an entire cast of intellectual and creative giants, from Cranach to Bach, Goethe to Schiller, Herder to Liszt. The Bauhaus movement was born here, later peaking in Dessau. Architectural gems abound, from medieval cathedrals to Neoclassical palaces and fantastical Hundertwasser buildings. Those looking for nature should head for the trails of the Thuringian Forest or take a leisurely stroll around the richly landscaped gardens at Wörlitz.

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Medium 9782067182042

Oregon Coast

Michelin Michelin ePub

The Willamette’s loamy soil gives rise to a feast of foods that enrich the plates of the finest restaurants in Portland. The climate and soil are ideal for vineyards, and more than 500 wineries, mostly west of Interstate 5, draw visitors from around the world to wine-country tasting rooms. Charming small towns, bucolic countryside and farm stands provide additional reasons to stop and savor Oregon’s wine country.

A string of cities, including the state capital of Salem and the free-spirited town of Eugene, are situated along I-5, which runs north to south through the center of the valley. To the west, the forested Coast Range cradles the valley, and 30mi to the east, waterfalls plummet down mossy Cascade Range hillsides alongside wooded hiking trails whose vine maple trees turn crimson and orange in the fall.

SALEMa

The capital of Oregon is the state’s third-largest city (pop. 156,000). Salem traces its founding to 1840, when Jason Lee moved the headquarters of his Methodist mission to this mid-Willamette Valley location. Lee’s house and other early buildings still stand at the Willamette Heritage Center at the Millaa (1313 Mill St.; t 503-585-7012; www.willametteheritage.org; open year-round Mon–Sat 10am–5pm ;$6), a five-acre historical park that includes the 1889 Thomas Kay Woolen Mill. A millstream courses beneath the main mill building, and inside, massive looms operate with water-powered turbines. Four buildings, filled with period furnishings, were moved to this site, and are considered the oldest in the Northwest, dating to the 1840s.

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