291 Chapters
Medium 9782067181977

SICILY

Michelin Michelin ePub

SICILY

Trinacria – the queen of the Mediterranean – was invaded time and again over the centuries by various peoples: the Phoenicians, the Greeks, the Romans, the Byzantines, the Normans and the Arabs. Consequently, the island has a particularly varied cultural heritage. In recent years, the region’s wine production has attracted enormous attention, thanks to the prudent redevelopment of viticulture and the excellent results achieved with the cultivation of international varieties.

A winemaking estate in Sicily

Mirabile/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Sicily boasts an extraordinary heritage of grape varieties: among the whites Catarrato, Carricante, Inzolia, Grillo, Grecanico, Minnella Bianca, Malvasia delle Lipari, Zibibbo (or Moscato d’Alessandria) are native to the island, as are Frappato, Nero d’Avola, Perticone, Calabrese, Nerello Mascalese, Pignatello, Gaglioppo and Nocera among the reds. Nevertheless, international varieties – Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon – are also grown here successfully, yielding exceptional wines. For centuries, Sicily has been associated with sweet wines. Moscato di Noto, Moscato di Siracusa, Passito di Pantelleria and Malvasia delle Lipari are distinguished by their seductive and fruity bouquets, whereas Marsala, the Italian fortified wine that has made history, deserves special mention.

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Medium 9782067182042

Jacksonville

Michelin Michelin ePub

For more than 11,000 years, well before the creation of Crater Lake in its caldera, Klamath and Modoc Indians fought each other here. In 1869 they were forced to share a reservation before being banished four years later to Oklahoma. In the mid-19C, gold seekers from California headed north to Jacksonville's strike. Disappointed that the strike was short-lived, most prospectors returned south. Those who stayed in the area found the valleys suitable for farms, orchards and vineyards, and the mountains rich in timber. Today what attracts visitors to this corner of Oregon is one of the country's finest Shakespeare festivals, staged in the town of Ashland. Jacksonville's allure is its gold-rush era buildings and a popular summer festival. Outdoor recreation is a magnet on its own.

Water-Power Flour

The water-powered Butte Creek Mill and General Store (t 541-826-3531; www.buttecreekmill.com), in Eagle Point, 12mi north of Medford en route to Crater Lake, offer a fascinating glimpse of yesteryear. Creaking belts, rotating gears and archaic mechanisms groan, whirr and rumble as they turn grain into flour at this rare working grist mill. The adjoining antiques shop is stocked with the mill’s flour and local culinary goods, amid hurricane lanterns, tin plates and other vestiges of the past.

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Medium 9782067182042

Southwest Washington

Michelin Michelin ePub

Open year-round daily. Visitor center at 3029 Spirit Lake Hwy., Toutle; t 360-274-0962; www.parks.wa.gov/stewardship/mountsthelens; open May–mid-Sept daily 9am–5pm, rest of the year 4pm; closed major holidays. t 360-449-7800. www.fs.usda.gov/mountsthelens. $5.

One of the world’s most famous volcanoes, Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980 with the intensity of 500 atomic bombs, destroying its northern flank and blasting away more than 1,300ft of elevation. In 1982 the US Congress declared Mount St. Helens a National Volcanic Monument. Today the eviscerated mountain, surrounded by a 172sq-mi preserve, is a leading visitor attraction.

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument
©MountStHelens.com

Practical Information

When to Go

July is the best time to see flower-filled alpine meadows at Mt. Rainier, but any summer day through September offers the best opportunity for clear weather and great views at both Rainier and Mount St. Helens. Summertime frequently brings fog to the Washington coast, so the best times to visit are the shoulder seasons or winter-storm season.

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Medium 9782067182042

Seattle

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Coast Salish peoples roamed the shores of what’s now Elliott Bay long before British naval captain George Vancouver sailed into Puget Sound in 1792. No serious settlement occurred in the area until the 1850s, when an Oregon Trail party chose Alki Point as a suitable site. Chief Sealth and his fellow Duwamish Indians welcomed the newcomers. Eventually a trading post and lumber mill were established, and throughout the late 1850s, Seattle continued to grow. With local timber depleted, coal became the city’s major export. In 1897 Seattle became the gateway to the Klondike, supplying gold prospectors who swarmed the city. As the gold petered out, timber barons Frederick Weyerhaeuser and William Boeing established industries that would fuel the area’s economy for years to come (Boeing switched from timber to a new technology: flight). Early 20C streetcar suburbs expanded city boundaries, drawing German, Scandinavian, Italian and Asian immigrants as workers and entrepreneurs, but the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 prompted authorities to send the city’s 7,000 Japanese residents to detainment camps. The early 1960s brought construction of I-5 and Seattle’s second World’s Fair, and now famous icon, the Space Needle. The fair structures left behind formed the basis for a major urban renewal project. The latest such project will renovate the city’s waterfront. Home to Starbucks and lots of roasteries (plus high-tech giants Microsoft and Amazon), Seattle has a widespread cafe culture. It's known for sparkling seascapes and recreational opportunities.

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Medium 9781907099229

GRAMPIANS

Michelin Michelin ePub

Northern Scotland

■ Grampians

■ Highlands and Western Isles

■ Orkney Islandsaa

■ Shetland Islands

GRAMPIANS

The Grampians, comprising the Cairngorms, Moray and Aberdeenshire, are Britain’s finest mountain scenery. As wild as the Arctic or as tame as a family railway ride, they are accessible to any visitor. The delights of Royal Deeside are well known, those of Aberdeen less so, and the Granite City is often the Grampians’ surprise package; few tourists expect city-slick culture this far north of Edinburgh! Outside the city are some of Scotland’s best castles, finest fishing villages and a tempting malt whisky trail.

Highlights

1 Skiing, snowboarding, or simply walking, around Aviemore

2 Enjoying a wee dram at the Glenfiddich Distillery

3 A sunny stroll in the gardens at Crathes Castle

4 Discovering Old Aberdeen and its Cathedral

5 Standing on top of the region at Cairn Gorm

Aberdeen and Central Aberdeenshire

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