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Fighting the War at Home

Various Brethren Press PDF

dunkerguide-history-complete35/27/104:56 PMPage 1191958-2008Fighting the war at home by Logan CondonBrethren peace stance faced challenges during Vietnam eraHe was walking to class when the bullet hit him. The damage to his vertebrae and spine would cost him part of a lung and leave his legs permanently paralyzed. Others were not so lucky. Shortly after noon on Monday, May 4, 1970, DeanKahler—along with 12 other Kent State University students—would become a victim in one of the most polarizing events of the era. Kahler, a member of the Church of theBrethren, was one of 13 wounded when National Guard troops opened fire on a rowdy group of students who had gathered to protest American involvement in theVietnam conflict. Four of the 13 would not survive their wounds.The incident at Kent State became a pivotal example of the duality of the Vietnam conflict. It had become a two-front war: a conflict between armed soldiers in SoutheastAsia, and one of public opinion at home in the United States. This tension tore at

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Resurrection

Various Brethren Press PDF

A DUNKERG U I D E TOResurrectionDeath is the last enemyMark 16:1-6; 1 Corinthians 15:26David HoslerT“resurrection” is primarily associated with Christ’s return from death to life following his suffering and crucifixion. However, a secondary meaning of resurgence or revival is often used in contemporary, common speech. But it is the belief that Christ conquered death and walked again in bodily form among his friends and followers that is central toChristians generally and Brethren in particular. The thought of the body’s death awaiting every living being is sobering apart from the victory over death that is found in following Jesus’ promise of life everlasting.In Mark 16:6 we find an unambiguous declaration, made to the early morning visitors to Christ’s tomb on that first Easter: “He has risen!” (Today’sNew International Version). Then Paul picks up the significance of this basic belief in 1 Corinthians 15 with what would be fitting of an eloquent closing argument in a modern courtroom legal proceeding. Paul reminds all believers of their foundational commitment to the gospel. He writes: “Now, brothers and sisters, I want to remind you of the gospel I preached to you, which you received and on which you have taken your stand. By this gospel you are saved, if you hold firmly to the word I preached to you. Otherwise, you have believed in vain” (1 Cor. 15:1-2, TNIV). Then comes the grand defense of belief in Christ’s resurrection in verse 12 through 19, ending with the argument: “If only for this life we have hope in Christ, we are to be pitied more than all others” (TNIV). Finally, the point of Paul’s defense of belief in the he word

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Why Brethren History?

Various Brethren Press PDF

dunkerguide-history-complete35/27/104:55 PMPage 7300 YEARSWhy Brethren history? by Frank RamirezHeritage is full of rich stories and lessonsIlearned a good deal of Brethren history before I even considered joining the Brethren. What surprised me at the time was how little real Brethren knew about their own story.In 1974, while I was a theater arts major at La Verne College in California, fellow students Mike Titus and Phil Franklin told me that professor Vernard Eller had been asked to write a play about Brethren beginnings called “A Time SoUrgent.” It had been commissioned for the 250th anniversary of the church in1958 but never performed. Mike and Phil got this crazy idea that we ought to take this play out into Brethren society that summer. Could I help?It was the height of the gas crisis, with long lines at the pump, but the college was offering us a van (wonderfully refurbished because the staff mistakenly thought it was for the president) and a gas card. We would depend on Brethren churches for food, lodging, and maybe an offering or two.

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John Naas

Various Brethren Press PDF

dunkerguide-history-complete35/27/104:55 PMPage 281708-1758John NaasTall man or tall tale? by Frank RamirezWill the real John Naas (1669-1741) please stand up?Was he the character in the Dorothy Brandt Davis children’s book TheTall Man who endured torture cheerfully because he had no captain but Immanuel?Maybe not. This most famous story about Naas may not be true. According to an account more than a century and a half later by Abraham Harley Cassel, Naas—“a man of great physique and commanding personality”—was press-ganged to become part of the royal bodyguard for the king of Prussia. Despite excruciating tortures, including thumbscrews and being forced to hang by a toe and a thumb, Naas did not submit. When finally dragged before the throne he was reported to have said that he had no captain butChrist, which so impressed the king that he was released and given a gold coin for his faithfulness.There is no such account among either theEuropean or Colonial documents, although Naas is often mentioned in many other regards. It is possible that some confused him with John Fisher from Hall, who was tortured for 10 days and, after refusing to renounce his faith, pricked with pins all over his body and thrown into a hole, where he was found by a prince who took pity on him and arranged for his release.

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Prophetic Rhetoric and Preaching

Various Brethren Press PDF

Chapter 7:Layout 15/21/101:18 PMPage 151Prophetic Rhetoric and PreachingChristopher D. Bowman“Who in their right mind would presume to speak theWord of God week in and week out?”—Waltersdorff 12Displayed in the Juniata College library is a striking sculpture of the prophet Jeremiah. The pockmarks of decay and damage found throughout the piece are not there by accident nor have they been artificially created. They are there because the sculptor purposefully chose a damaged cherry tree, aged and filled with buckshot, from which to hew the aged and wounded prophet Jeremiah. Describing his work, sculptor Dean Egge emphasized the importance of paying attention to both his audience and the prophet. Once he understood the old subject and the new recipient, the sculptor says,“The search then began for the right log.”1In preaching today, this combination of listening to the original message and knowing the new recipient is essential to finding the right log. This essay pays attention to the rhetoric of the Hebrew

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