11 Chapters
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Chapter 6: Forms for Gathering Information

Ambrose Panico Solution Tree Press ePub

Chapter 6

Forms for Gathering Information

Seek first to understand, then to be understood.

Stephen Covey

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All the interview, survey, questionnaire, inventory, and profile forms are intended to assist the behavior intervention team in the development of the behavior intervention plan.

This chapter contains the following forms to aid the team in its quest for relevant information:

 Plan to Do Better—This form is used to develop a record of the actual behavior intervention plan and to record the student’s progress.

 Standard Interview Form—This is used to secure information from the behavior intervention team members or any individual the team believes has information relevant to the behavior and that may help answer essential questions.

 Student Interview Form—This form is used to secure information from the student; it may be completed by the student or by a team member who uses the form to record the student’s responses.

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Chapter 5: Five Steps to Changing Behavior

Ambrose Panico Solution Tree Press ePub

Chapter 5

Five Steps to Changing Behavior

He is the best sailor who can steer within fewest points of wind, and exact a motive power out of the greatest obstacles.

—Henry David Thoreau

Now that you understand the different kinds of intervention tools, this chapter will explain the five-step process for developing thoughtful, viable behavior change plans that incorporate those tools. This chapter also contains a collection of essential questions that serves as a useful resource for a problem-solving team engaged in developing behavior change plans. The questions provide thinking points and discussion prompts to help define the nonproductive behavior, secure the student’s input, determine the function of the behavior, and select the appropriate behavior change tools.

Overview of the Plan to Do Better Process

 

Step 1: Identify and describe the nonproductive behavior, including the behavior’s characteristics and context.

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Part II: Activities

Ambrose Panico Solution Tree Press ePub

The most important observation you can make is when you become a glimmer in the child’s eyes and he becomes a glimmer in yours.

—Albert E. Trieschman, American educator, psychologist, and writer

 

Chapter 5

Getting Acquainted

The challenges and activities in this chapter are designed to help you get to know your students and to help your students get to know each other. Most teachers understand the importance of getting to know their students and make a conscious effort to do so. Some plan specific activities and set aside designated times to make sure this happens. Others do it a little less formally, but they do it all the same.

Far fewer teachers understand the tremendous importance of helping their students get to know each other. Fewer still actually schedule activities and set aside time to encourage students to build relationships with each other.

While it is entirely possible to teach a class of students who do not know each other, it can be much more effective and much more enjoyable to teach a class of students who have built relationships with each other. Whether they know it or not, most teachers (ourselves included) have suffered the following effects of teaching in a classroom where the students are unfamiliar with each other:

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Appendices

Ambrose Panico Solution Tree Press ePub

Benard, B. (2005). What is it about TRIBES?: The research-based components of the developmental process of TRIBES Learning Communities®. Windsor, CA: CenterSource Systems, LLC.

Caine, G., & Caine, R. N. (2001) The brain, education, and the competitive edge. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Caine, R. N., Caine, G., McClintic, C., & Klimek, K. (2005). 12 Brain/mind learning principles in action: The fieldbook for making connections, teaching, and the human brain. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Chappelle, S., & Bigman, L. (1998). Diversity in action: Using adventure activities to explore issues of diversity with middle school and high school age youth. Hamilton, MA: Project Adventure, Inc.

Frank, L. S. (2004). Journey toward the caring classroom: Using adventure to create community in the classroom and beyond. Oklahoma City, OK: Wood ‘n’ Barnes Publishing.

Gambone, M. A., & Connell, J. P. (2003). Youth development framework for practice. San Francisco and Island Heights, NJ: Community Network for Youth Development and Youth Development Strategies, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.cnyd.org/framework/index.php

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Chapter 4: The Five Behavior Change Tools

Ambrose Panico Solution Tree Press ePub

Chapter 4

The Five Behavior Change Tools

Far from disheartening your pupils’ youthful courage, spare nothing to lift up their souls; make them your equals in order that they may become your equals.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

The Plan to Do Better process focuses the intervention team’s effort on developing viable solutions for challenging behaviors. To that end, the team must consider not only the typical reinforcement-based interventions, but four other kinds of interventions as well: belief-based, skill-based, needs-based, and environment-based interventions. Teams will often incorporate several behavior change tools in the development of a single plan.

The need to go beyond the simple application of reinforcement-based behavior change tools is well-documented (see the work of Gable, Hendrickson, Tonelson, & Van Acker, 2002, on students with emotional and behavioral disabilities). Belief-based tools help us distinguish between behavior (skill) deficits and cognitive (belief) deficits, as Nichols (2001) has argued we must; students sometimes need instruction that challenges their longstanding cognitive distortions before they can change behaviors. Skill-based tools teach both interpersonal and (more recently) intrapersonal skills. Van Acker (1998) simply says that when a child has an interpersonal skill deficit, our logical course of action is to teach the skill. (He further notes that once the skill is taught, a reinforcement-based program may be required.) Olson and Platt (2000) offer various cognitive mediation strategies—such as self-talk, self-instruction, and self-evaluation—to develop intrapersonal skills and ultimate self-control of overt behavior. Needs-based tools are supported by the work of Glasser (1996), who pioneered the notion that needs drive behavior and that students may be provided alternative socially acceptable behaviors to meet their very legitimate needs. He stresses the need to “(1) survive and reproduce but also, (2) to belong and love, (3) to gain power, (4) to be free, and (5) to have fun” (Glasser, 2001, p. 25). Finally, it is accepted practice that the careful manipulation of environmental variables through environment-based tools may be necessary to support behavioral change (Gable et al., 2000).

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