30 Slices
Medium 9781855753211

CHAPTER SIX: What can I do to help the bereaved?

Penny Rawson Karnac Books ePub

Be aware of what can happen in bereavement

It can be a great help if you are aware of what a grieving person can go through, so you yourself may wish to read up about grief and bereavement, not just the earlier pages here, but other books also. In this way you may be able to be more understanding when, perhaps, someone seems to be irrationally angry for a while, as happens, or keeps dropping things. (You will recall from Chapter Two and the list of effects of grief that muscles are affected.)

Some of the ideas outlined in Chapter Five could also be suggested, and perhaps you could work along with the bereaved with some of the ideas. They may also spark off other ideas that are more suitable for your friend. My suggestions are just examples.

At a time of loss it is so hard for the one grieving to make the move, so don’t hesitate to make the offer, to issue the invitation. The last thing the bereaved need is to be ignored, abandoned, left to get on with it because we don’t know what to say or how to say it. Some cross the road rather than meet the person who has suffered a bereavement. In doing this they exacerbate the bereaved person s sense of loss. Often the bereaved person finds that they are having to reassure others about their own loss. How back to front this is, and yet it is so often the reality. We certainly need to be tactful, sensitive to what people want and need. We can but ask! Is it so difficult to say, What would help? , and I am so sorry , or to give a hug if that is appropriate? If the person simply does not know, can we not try to see if there is some way to help.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855752931

CHAPTER FOUR: Findings from the initial cycles of analysis

Penny Rawson Karnac Books ePub

This chapter reports the findings from the first phase of the analysis. It is organized as follows:

Section A. Summary of fieldwork

Section B. The empirical data

i) Key themes from the analysis of my selected cases

ii) Key themes from a combination of my own cases and those of colleagues

Section C. The data emerging from the literary sources

i) Key proponents

ii) The developmental context of brief psychodynamic therapy

iii) The key themes emerging from the literature

Section D: Empirical data: key themes from analysis of the cases against themes from literature

Section E. Reflections on the initial findings

Section F. A reflective process to select key themes for further analysis

Section A. Summary of fieldwork

The first stage was to undertake case work that would become the focus of detailed analysis. Eleven cases were examined in total, eight from my own college practice, two from a colleague within the same college and one case from another therapist (AM) in private practice. The rationale for the way that the case material has been used and presented has been discussed in the last chapter. In summary Case “I” is to be seen in full in Chapter 6 and extracts from the other cases are used in the detailed examination of the key themes. Three commentaries written by the clients also appear in full in Chapter 6, Clients M, C and “I”.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855753044

CHAPTER THREE: The importance of the first session

Penny Rawson Karnac Books ePub

The importance of the first session has already been mentioned briefly. The manner in which the first session is dealt with is critical to the shortening of the therapy. In particular the therapist should pay very careful attention to the client and to every detail of what happens in therapy, from the very first moments of the encounter with the client. This is essential to the brief approach and a very important factor in the shortening process.

Careful attention in the first moments

The words that the client uses in the opening sentences of the therapeutic encounter are crucial and often contain the kernel of the whole contract. Therefore, it is vital that the therapist notes every word that the client says in those first few minutes. Right from the moment that the therapist first encounters the client, the therapist needs to be paying very careful attention, to both what the client is saying and how they are saying it. If the client has actually stated why they have come or what it is that they want from the sessions once, they will feel that it has been said. They may then, quite reasonably, make the assumption

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855753044

CHAPTER SIX: Flexibility

Penny Rawson Karnac Books ePub

It is important that the therapist can be flexible. This applies to techniques, to the time scale and to the possibility of renegotiating the contract in respect of both focus and time as necessary.

Pinpoint the issues

In holding the focus and working with the client we need to pinpoint the issues, help the client to discharge the emotions that reside with these, and help them to change the situation in the present. The reason for this is so that they can move forward somewhat more freely.

With one client there may be no need to do anything other than ask, ‘What brought you to the counselling?’ for it all to pour out clearly and lucidly. Another client may be barely able to get out a few disjointed thoughts as to their emotional state and the therapist needs to be able to help them, applying appropriate skills flexibly.

Education

The flexibility of the therapist is called into play in finding and holding the focus. One of the ways to do this is that of education. This is an area that is sometimes overlooked. I believe that we need to help clients to be aware of psychological processes, to teach them how to become their own therapists. For example, so many people are utterly ignorant as to the many effects that grief can have on them. Very often, once they are aware of this they no longer require therapy. I have so often heard clients say, ‘Oh, I thought I was going mad. Now I understand what is happening, I think I can cope.’

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855752931

CHAPTER ONE: Why this book? A personal and contextual perspective

Penny Rawson Karnac Books ePub

Whathat is focal and short term psychotherapy? This is a question that I am frequently asked by professional counsellors, therapists and lay people and this is what inspired me to write this book.

I am asked the question because it is an approach that I practise and believe in. It is an approach that I teach and write about and have appeared on TV to talk about in Carlton TV’s programme “What Therapy”—November 1990 and again in March 1995.

“So, what is it?” I know that the approach I have come to practise is called focal and short-term psychotherapy—but how to explain it to other professionals. How do they not know of its existence? Very many people are practising a brief approach—but often due to external pressures. These are often caused by economic factors. GPs may restrict their counsellors to six sessions per client, and colleges and employee assistance schemes often restrict therapists to six or eight sessions or less. The Tavistock Clinic has an Adolescent Unit where sessions are restricted to four. All of these do so for economic reasons, i.e. scarcity of counsellors /therapists in relation to the client demand.

See All Chapters

See All Slices