13 Chapters
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Chapter 7 Use Team Walkthroughs to Build School Capacity

Elaine K. McEwan-Adkins Solution Tree Press ePub

We have a plethora of seminars in which people [teachers] sit and listen to ideas and concepts. We human beings can learn some things those ways—mostly specific cognitive content. But many things about organizations [schools], operations [curriculum and instruction], and people [students] can only be learned by firsthand experience. The tangible, physical, material aspects of knowledge acquisition and knowledge transfer, learning by doing, learning by coaching and teaching, are critical.

—Pfeffer & Sutton (2000, p. 250)

1. Understand the literacy look-fors.

2. Understand the classroom walkthroughs.

3. Assess your instructional leadership capacity.

4. Orient your faculty to the look-fors and walkthroughs.

5. Collect and analyze look-for frequency data.

6. Develop, implement, and assess embedded professional development.

7. Use team walkthroughs to build school capacity.

You have now reached the most exciting step in your school’s implementation of the literacy look-fors and walkthroughs: using grade-level team walkthroughs to build school capacity. In this chapter, you and your teachers will begin to simultaneously build instructional, academic, and leadership capacities, as you go on two- to three-minute walkthroughs searching for the literacy look-for your teachers unpacked in their grade-level teams. Immediately following the walkthroughs, you and the team will spend thirty minutes debriefing about what they saw and the implications of their observations for their own classroom instruction.

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Part III: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Elaine K. McEwan-Adkins Solution Tree Press ePub

PART III:

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

There may one day be modes and methods of information delivery that are as efficient and powerful as text, but for now there is no contest. To grow, our students must read lots, and more specifically they must read lots of ‘complex’ texts—texts that offer them new language, new knowledge, and new modes of thought.

ADAMS (2009)

Part III presents a set of literacy strategies designed to help your students meet the standards found in the section of the Common Core College and Career Anchor Standards for Reading titled Integration of Knowledge and Ideas. As Marilyn Adams points out in the epigraph, when students don’t read lots of complex texts, they end up with word and world knowledge deficits that in turn lead to a downward spiral of comprehension difficulties and a diminishing motivation to read. This is a vicious cycle that must be broken and sooner rather than later.

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Part II: Overview of Craft and Structure

Elaine K. McEwan-Adkins Solution Tree Press ePub

PART II:

Overview of Craft and Structure

Academic vocabulary is the true language of power and that is particularly true for our English Language Learners and a wide variety of kids we care about most.

COLEMAN (2011)

Part II presents a set of literacy strategies designed to help your students meet the standards found in the second section of the Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading titled Craft and Structure. It is one of four broad categories set forth to describe the critical skills of reading comprehension that independent and highly proficient readers use during the reading of complex informational texts.

The big idea of Craft and Structure is this: students must go beyond merely understanding what the text is about to acquiring the skills needed to dig more deeply into the text, particularly regarding academic vocabulary. If you have not already discovered the glossary, turn to it now. It contains over sixty words and terms that students must understand before they can give voice to their thinking processes, understand the directions their teachers are giving, and write about what they have read in a constructed response according to the directions. In too many cases, even when students do understand what the text is about, they do not understand the directions. Figure P2.1 presents an overview of the five elements of an author’s style that will be explored in this section.

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Part I: Overview of Key Ideas and Details

Elaine K. McEwan-Adkins Solution Tree Press ePub

PART I:

Overview of Key Ideas and Details

The Common Core State Standards demand, they do not request, that the building of knowledge through reading text plays a fundamental role in [all] disciplines.

COLEMAN (2011)

Part I presents a set of literacy strategies designed to help your students meet the standards found in the first section of the Common Core College and Career Anchor Standards for Reading titled Key Ideas and Details. It is one of four broad categories set forth in the CCR Anchor Standards for Reading to describe the critical skills of reading comprehension that independent and highly proficient readers use during the reading of complex informational literary and informational texts. This first section of the CCR Anchor Standards for Reading contains more strategies than the remaining three categories combined. The reason for this seeming imbalance is that each of the CCR Anchor Standards in Key Ideas and Details contains several foundational reading skills. This necessitates teasing out each of these more discrete skills before we reassemble and apply them in later more complex standards and strategies.

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Chapter 6 Develop, Implement, and Assess Embedded Professional Development

Elaine K. McEwan-Adkins Solution Tree Press ePub

Changes in schools may be initiated from without, but the most important and lasting change will come from within.

—Barth (1990, p. 159)

1. Understand the literacy look-fors.

2. Understand the classroom walkthroughs.

3. Assess your instructional leadership capacity.

4. Orient your faculty to the look-fors and walkthroughs.

5. Collect and analyze look-for frequency data.

6. Develop, implement, and assess embedded professional development.

7. Use team walkthroughs to build school capacity.

If you have been diligently climbing the seven steps to a power-packed implementation of the literacy look-fors and walkthroughs, you have just finished collecting, aggregating, and analyzing the data from your first round of walkthroughs. Put the final data analysis in a safe place. You will want to compare your frequency counts from this baseline data collection with the frequency counts you obtain after your staff has engaged in the embedded professional development described in this chapter.

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