Yasuda S Raj R Griffin K (18)
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781786392343

9 Pilgrimage and Historical Tourism on West Java: Learning about History

Yasuda, S.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

9 

Pilgrimage and Historical Tourism on

West Java: Learning about History

Jörgen Hellman*

School of Global Studies, Gothenburg University, Sweden

Introduction

This chapter provides a broad introduction to pilgrimage on Java. The aim is to familiarize the reader with Javanese traditions of learning about self and society through travel. To illustrate this, the ethnographic focus is on a group of pilgrims who visit the sacred site of a local ancestor to learn more about themselves and the ancient Sundanese kingdom of Pajajaran.

For many Sundanese (the ethnic majority of west Java, Indonesia), the last Hindu kingdom on west Java, Pajajaran, and its king, Siliwangi, carry great significance – they symbolize strength, unity and prosperity. However, in the mid-16th century, this kingdom fell, so its history is also one of defeat and subjugation to growing Islamic and colonial powers, although some describe this as just a temporary suppression. However, according to popular folklore, Siliwangi did not die but disappeared mysteriously just before the empire collapsed, and he promised to return in the future.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786392343

1 Religious Tourism and Sacred Sites in Asia

Yasuda, S.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

1 

Religious Tourism and Sacred

Sites in Asia

Kevin Griffin1, Razaq Raj2,* and Shin Yasuda3

Dublin Institute of Technology; 2Leeds Beckett University, UK*;

3

Takasaki City University of Economics, Japan

1

Introduction: Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage in Asia

According to the UNWTO (2000, p. 22) there is a global trend for holidays to be more than recreational, with physical and mental rejuvenation increasingly expected. Spiritual rejuvenation is also a growing need. There is an above-average growth in religious tourism and this is clearly evident in Asia, with major religious icons such as Angkor Wat in Cambodia, the Buddhist temples in Korea, holy mountains in Japan, mosques in the former Soviet Union and Hindu sites in

India all experiencing expansion, development and increased numbers of tourists and pilgrims.

While the absolute scale of international pilgrims is extremely difficult to estimate, the number of 330 million was suggested by the

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786392343

18 Discussion Questions

Yasuda, S.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

18 

Discussion Questions

Please note, some of these questions can be answered fully in relation to the chapter in this book. However, many of them will require the student/reader to engage with the broader literature to explore and develop their ideas further.

Chapter 2

How are heritage and religious tourism used as tools by the tourism industry?

How can heritage/tourism result in the inappropriate overuse and commodification of religious sites, and how can this exploitation be mitigated?

What are the risks, and the related potential benefits, in developing tourism in Oman?

Chapter 4

Chapter 3

166�

Discuss the management strategy of entrepreneurs in the field of religious tourism by  focusing on their interactions with

­consumers.

Examine the impact of entrepreneurship in religious tourism by specifically investigating the relationship between producers and consumers.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786392343

10 To Own the Sacred, to Control the People: A Case Study of the Mahābodhi Temple Complex in Bodhgayā, India

Yasuda, S.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

10 

To Own the Sacred, to Control the

People: A Case Study of the Mahābodhi

Temple Complex in Bodhgayā, India

Nikhil Joshi*

National University of Singapore

Introduction

The Mahābodhi Temple and its immediate surrounding landscape are inherently not sacred places; they are ordinary physical places that have been established and strengthened over time as extraordinary, mainly through dynamic ritual–architectural relationships. This is not just an assertion; in the following study I will qualify it by assessing the attributes of sacredness. I have made this statement at the beginning of this chapter to highlight the theoretical problem that since ‘sacred’ is generally associated with ‘supernatural’, construction and constitution of a sacred place must be devoid of the profane

(non-religious or secular) forces. This chapter will argue that since ‘sacred’ or ‘supernatural’ have multivalent meanings in different religions or even different sects of the same religion, it is highly likely that a sacred place could be interpreted in several different and even conflicting ways by communities who may use the term to denote various religious and secular concepts – social, political and economic. Therefore, it is vital that the sacredness of a place should not be interpreted only in terms of architecture and canonical scriptures but also by the ways in which its users interact with it socially, culturally and politically, and form various identities through

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786392343

17 Religion and Religious Tourism: A Case Study of Kerala

Yasuda, S.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

17 

Religion and Religious Tourism:

A Case Study of Kerala

Subhash Kizhakanveatil Bhaskaran Pillai*

Department of Commerce, Goa University, Goa, India

Introduction

It is a well-known fact that India is the birthplace of Hinduism, more aptly described as a way of living rather than a religion. It is ancient, yet living, and widely practised by more than 1 billion people, or around 13.95% of the world’s population. India is also known as the ‘Land of Temples’, famous across the globe for its beautiful architecture and sculptures, and these are some of the most important tourism products, attracting

­millions of tourists from around the world.

The reason why India is considered the

Land of Temples is because from time immemorial Indians believed and practised the sacred proverb from the Vedic period, ‘Gopura dharshan, koti punyam’ (‘The sight of a temple tower gives you ten million good things’). That is the main reason why most Hindu houses are located close to temples and have a separate pooja room in order to have the presence of the Almighty in the house. In other words, visits to temples became part-and-parcel of the Indian way of life, which is, in essence, the origin of pilgrimage and spiritual tourism in India. Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive information available with respect to the exact number of Hindu temples in and around India (Swaminathan, 2017).

See All Chapters

See All

Wheatley Margaret J (25)
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781576750506

I

Wheatley, Margaret J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

I

L

identity and change, 50, 93, 95, 100 and control, 47, 95 and emergence, 78, 87 and evolution, 62 and poetry, 12 and self, 46-64, 92 and systems, 50, 56-64, 82, 85, 100 importance of, 3, 14, 47, 54, 57-58,

62, 64, 85-86, 88, 100 images of the world, 1-3, 8, 49. See also worldviews, machine images. incentives, 63 incoherence, in organizations, 60, 63 individuals, relation to systems, 44,

67-68, 70-72, 78-79, 90 information and emergence, 78, 87 importance of, 25-26, 33, 38-39, 46,

49, 81-82, 84, 101 in systems, 86, 98, 101 inquiring organizations, 86, 102 insects. See termites, bees. institutionalization, as process, 57 integrity, and incoherence, 60 interdependence, 14, 18, 23, 44, 52,

102 intervention, in systems, 81, 98 isolation, 51, 52, 73

law, scientific, 48 leaders, role of, 44, 57, 67-68, 72-73, 97 leadership, 60, 63, 80 learning, 7, 26, 33, 80, 96

Lewontin, R. C., 18 life, irresistibility of, 29, 33, 91 lightbulbs, experiments with selforganization, 31 linking, as characteristic of life, 35, 53 local efforts, 32, 70-71 logic, of life, 13-14 loneliness, 44, 53 love, and organizations, 57, 62-63

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576750506

J

Wheatley, Margaret J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

I

L

identity and change, 50, 93, 95, 100 and control, 47, 95 and emergence, 78, 87 and evolution, 62 and poetry, 12 and self, 46-64, 92 and systems, 50, 56-64, 82, 85, 100 importance of, 3, 14, 47, 54, 57-58,

62, 64, 85-86, 88, 100 images of the world, 1-3, 8, 49. See also worldviews, machine images. incentives, 63 incoherence, in organizations, 60, 63 individuals, relation to systems, 44,

67-68, 70-72, 78-79, 90 information and emergence, 78, 87 importance of, 25-26, 33, 38-39, 46,

49, 81-82, 84, 101 in systems, 86, 98, 101 inquiring organizations, 86, 102 insects. See termites, bees. institutionalization, as process, 57 integrity, and incoherence, 60 interdependence, 14, 18, 23, 44, 52,

102 intervention, in systems, 81, 98 isolation, 51, 52, 73

law, scientific, 48 leaders, role of, 44, 57, 67-68, 72-73, 97 leadership, 60, 63, 80 learning, 7, 26, 33, 80, 96

Lewontin, R. C., 18 life, irresistibility of, 29, 33, 91 lightbulbs, experiments with selforganization, 31 linking, as characteristic of life, 35, 53 local efforts, 32, 70-71 logic, of life, 13-14 loneliness, 44, 53 love, and organizations, 57, 62-63

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576750506

Poetics

Wheatley, Margaret J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF
Medium 9781576750506

F

Wheatley, Margaret J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

101-102 examples of, 16, 43 in organizations, 63, 87 domination, 42 dynamic processes, 81, 87

E ecosystem, 17, 39, 50 effectiveness, conditions for, 60, 94,

101-102 efficiency, 13, 24, 97

Eliot, T. S., 103 emergence, 53, 66-87 energy as characteristic of life, 62, 70, 73, 89, 93 and fear, 94, 102 in systems, 36, 59, 92 engagement, and emergence, 73 engineering, as control, 40, 73 environment, and relationships, 18, 19 equilibrium, as death, 33 error, role of, 22-24 ethics, in organizations, 62 evolution, 19, 42, 44, 53, 62, 78, 89, 93-94.

See also coevolution. experimentation, as characteristic of life,

13-14, 19-22, 24, 33, 47, 64, 74, 97-98 exploration as characteristic of life, 37, 49, 82, 86, 89,

101 in systems, 25, 83, 95, 98, 101 punishment of, 20

F failure, in organizations, 22, 76-77 faith, and organization, 74 fear as approach to life, 5-6, 11, 16, 64, 84, 96,

103 as motive for change, 93-95

128

a simpler way

in organizations, 15, 22-23, 37, 74, 78,

83, 102 fermentation, invention of, 29 finches, in Galapagos Islands, 43, 90, 101 form, creation of, 41, 48, 54, 60, 81, 83, 85,

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576750506

An Invitation

Wheatley, Margaret J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

The primary question of this book is: How could we organize human endeavor if we developed different understandings of how life organizes itself?

As authors, we ask this question for all of us, for there is no one who lives life unaffected by the organizations we have created. And we invite each of you into the inquiry. We hope we have succeeded in creating a work that evokes your own experience and connection with the concepts we describe. We want the design and arrangement of this book to invite you into new ways of seeing. We all need one other to explore these ideas. Each of us contributes our experiences and thinking to one another as we try to understand the world differently. We are essential to each other’s inquiry. We welcome you.

As we have played with new ideas and a new worldview, we keep attending to our beliefs. So much of human behavior is habitual. And behind every habit is a belief – about people, life, the world. We work from the premise that if we can know our beliefs, we can then act with greater consciousness about our behaviors.

See All Chapters

See All

Wani S P Raju K V (13)
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781786394514

9 Increasing Agricultural Productivity of Farming Systems in Parts of Central India – Sir Ratan Tata Trust Initiative

Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V. CABI PDF

9

Increasing Agricultural

Productivity of Farming

Systems in Parts of Central

India – Sir Ratan Tata Trust

Initiative

Gajanan L. Sawargaonkar,* Girish Chander, Suhas P.

Wani, S.K. Dasgupta and G. Pardhasaradhi

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics,

Patancheru, India

Abstract

Soil health mapping was adopted as entry point activity in the initiative supported by Sir Ratan Tata Trust in

Jharkhand and Madhya Pradesh states of India which emphasized on developing soil test-based fertilizer recommendations at block level. In Jharkhand, yield benefit with balanced nutrition was 27–44% in paddy, groundnut and maize with benefit–cost (BC) ratio varying from 7.36 to 12.0. In Madhya Pradesh, balanced nutrition increased crop productivity by 11–57% in crops like soybean, paddy, green gram, black gram and groundnut with BC ratio of 1.97 to 9.35. Water harvesting through farm ponds (~500) helped in supplemental irrigation during critical crop stages besides serving as reservoir for fish cultivation. Efforts were made to promote off-season cultivation of vegetables, crop intensification, vermicompost units (~200) and seed bank in pilot villages and capacity development was carried out for ~15,000 farmers through direct demonstrations and around 2–3 times more through field days.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786394514

11 Farmer-centric Integrated Water Management for Improving Livelihoods – A Case Study of Rural Electrification Corporation Limited

Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V. CABI PDF

11

Farmer-centric Integrated Water

Management for Improving

Livelihoods – A Case Study of Rural Electrification

Corporation Limited

R. Sudi,* Girish Chander, Suhas P. Wani and G. Pardhasaradhi

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics,

Patancheru, India

Abstract

Rural Electrification Corporation Limited (RECL) supported an ICRISAT-led consortium to establish two watershed learning sites in Penukonda mandal (4 villages, 3150 ha of cultivated land and home to 8700 people) of

Anantapur district in Andhra Pradesh and Wanaparthy mandal (4 villages, 3968 ha of cultivated land and home to 11,726 people) in the Mahabubnagar district of Telangana. The community and farm-based rainwater conservation have created a net storage capacity of about 18,000 m3 with total conservation of about 50,000 m3/year of surface runoff water in Anantapur watershed, and 27,000 m3 storage capacity with conservation of about

54,000 m3/year of surface runoff water in Mahabubnagar watershed. Soil health improvement with soil testbased addition of macro- and micronutrients and carbon building, and varietal replacements are promoted with farmers in the watershed. The science-led management has resulted in increasing and sustaining crop and livestock productivity and diversification leading to increased incomes to farmers. The RECL–ICRISAT watershed sites have provided a proof of concept and a good learning site for holistic solutions to harness the system productivity and strengthening of livelihood.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786394514

10 Sustainable Development of Fragile Low-rainfall Regions – Power Grid Corporation of India Initiative

Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V. CABI PDF

10

Sustainable Development of Fragile Low-rainfall

Regions – Power Grid

Corporation of India Initiative

Prabhakar Pathak,* R. Sudi, Suhas P. Wani, Aviraj

Datta and Nagaraju Budama

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics,

Patancheru, India

Abstract

Rainfed agriculture in low-rainfall areas of Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka is characterized by high risks from drought, degraded natural resources and pervasive poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition. Under corporate social responsibility, Power Grid Corporation of India Limited, Gurugram, Haryana has been supporting International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, Telangana in implementing farmer-centric watershed management in Kurnool district, Andhra Pradesh and Vijayapura district, Karnataka for improving rural livelihoods and reducing degradation of natural resources. This innovative model of watershed management uses holistic approach with science-led development in participatory mode with farmers. The watershed interventions have increased water availability by 25–30%, increased irrigated area by 15–25%, improved cropping intensity by 20–30%, increased crop yields by 15–35%, increased area under high-value crops by 10–15%, increased income, improved livelihoods and reduced runoff, soil loss and environment degradation. Innovative low-cost village-based wastewater treatment units were established at benchmark watersheds to increase the water availability for irrigation and improve the surface and groundwater quality.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786394514

8 Scaling-up of Science-led Development – Sir Dorabji Tata Trust Initiative

Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V. CABI PDF

8

Scaling-up of Science-led

Development – Sir Dorabji

Tata Trust Initiative

Girish Chander,* P. Pathak, Suhas P. Wani,

G. Pardhasaradhi and S.K. Dasgupta

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics,

Patancheru, India

Abstract

Soil health mapping in Sir Dorabji Tata Trust-supported initiative across 16 districts of Madhya Pradesh and

Rajasthan, India showed widespread deficiencies of sulfur, boron, zinc and phosphorus. Soil test-based balanced nutrient management recorded yield benefit of 10–40%, while the integrated nutrient approach recorded still higher yield up to 20–50% along with 25–50% saving in chemical fertilizers through promotion of on-farm vermicomposting. Maximum yield advantage (90–200%) was realized with improved varieties and nutrient management. Other advantages included food/fodder nutrition, rainwater use efficiency, more food per kg of nitrogen or phosphorus, and residual benefits of micro/secondary nutrients and vermicompost. Promoting landform management enabled farmers to cultivate rainy season fallows and harvest 1270–1700 kg/ha soybean.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781786394514

7 Improving Water Availability and Diversification of Cropping Systems in Pilot Villages of North and Southern India

Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V. CABI PDF

7

Improving Water Availability and Diversification of Cropping

Systems in Pilot Villages of

North and Southern India

Kaushal K. Garg,1* Ramesh Singh,2 Suhas P. Wani,1

O.P. Chaturvedi,2 Inder Dev,2 Mukund D. Patil,1

R. Sudi1 and Anand K. Singh1,2

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru,

India; 2Central Agroforestry Research Institute (ICAR), Jhansi, India

1

Abstract

Bundelkhand region of Uttar Pradesh and southeastern region of Karnataka (e.g. Kolar) are hot spots of poverty located in the semi-arid tropics. These regions are vulnerable to climate change and experience water scarcity and land degradation. Despite having moderate to good rainfall (700–850 mm), freshwater availability in these areas are declining due to over-extraction, poor groundwater recharge and change in land use. With realization of the importance of watershed development programme, the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) along with national partners (ICAR – Central Agroforestry Research Institute (CAFRI), Jhansi), NGO (MYRADA), district administration, state governments and local community started developing a model watershed with support of

See All Chapters

See All

Vengel Alan (8)
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781583761564

Chapter Three: Learning the Key Behaviors That Drive Influence Success

Vengel, Alan Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

THE INFLUENCE EDGE

SE

LF

As you can see, the two fundamental factors—Your Goal and The Other Person—are clearly identifiable in the figure.

But in the middle, represented by the classic Asian symbol of yin and yang (meaning two opposite forces that complement each other), you will notice the words Push and Pull—two fundamentally different yet often complementary influence energies that interact with the two fundamental factors. Now let’s look at these two energies a little more closely.

Figure 1. Influence Model

WHAT IS PUSH ENERGY?

Figure 2. Push Energy

Push energy is direct, forceful, and persuasive. It’s not being aggressive so much as it is being assertive, or offering specific suggestions. It moves against people’s inclinations to get them to change course or initiate action. They may resist, withdraw, or even push back, but if you know how and when to use Push energy effectively, it can yield amazing results. For example:

Some restaurant patrons state their desires clearly: “I want a steak, medium rare, pare off the fat, baked potato with butter, no sour cream, string beans, and a very dry martini straight up. And I need to be out of here in 30 minutes.” They know exactly what they want and how they want it.You don’t need to read their minds or clarify details with them, and they definitely are not asking for your input or advice.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781583761564

Chapter Seven: Honing Your Influence Edge by Building Rapport

Vengel, Alan Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

THE INFLUENCE EDGE

Whoever Said Rapport

Wasn’t Built in a Day?

Consultants in my business are always telling their audiences and clients that most work gets done through good working relationships. Yet always the following question remains: how do you establish these relationships, when clearly the skills for this kind of approach to business requires time and energy, two ingredients that are in short supply in today’s fast-moving companies?

My answer is basically this: building a relationship can be done easily, in five minutes of strategically placed conversation. It doesn’t take five hours! One of my clients, an engineer at a high-tech firm, asked me for a quick fix to a rough peer relationship he had to improve. I asked him if he could give it five minutes a day of concentrated influence.

He said, “Sure, I guess it’s worth five minutes a day if I could turn this relationship around.”

I told him simply to seek common ground with this person—that he shouldn’t Push this person at all during these five minutes but should focus on what they had in common and express this commonality directly. I told him that the best influencers can find commonalties between themselves and most anyone.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781583761564

Chapter Six: Practice Scenarios for Increasing Your Influence Skills

Vengel, Alan Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

CHAPTER SIX: PRACTICE SCENARIOS FOR INCREASING YOUR INFLUENCE SKILLS

• What can you do to make it easier for the other person to agree? ____________________________________

____________________________________________

• What are the goals of the other person’s organization? If you and your subject are in the same organization, ask yourself

What are the goals of the other person’s department/ division/team/etc.? _____________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

STRATEGY STEP TWO: IDENTIFYING BEHAVIORS

Just like you did for the situation with Leslie, read the list below and determine which situations and behaviors correspond with your personal influence situation. Circle the corresponding behaviors. Remember, you want to choose behaviors so that they get you close to a resolution (and don’t forget your “back-up” behavior), but not so many that you will have a hard time sequencing them in the next strategy step. (Three is probably enough, but of course, it’s your situation and thus your choice.)

See All Chapters
Medium 9781583761564

Chapter Four: Attuning to Personal Communication Styles

Vengel, Alan Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

THE INFLUENCE EDGE

Authoritarians

We Have Known

One of my clients, Ben, a human resources representative at a major computer manufacturer was frustrated with a new manager who had joined his business unit. The new manager seemed overly forceful and at times aggressive when dealing with

Ben, uncooperative and short with him in staff meetings.

“How should I deal with this manager?” Ben asked me. “I tried to engage him by asking open-ended questions and using listening skills, but he just gets annoyed and wants to move away from me.”

I suggested that Ben change his approach from the Pull behaviors he was using to Push behaviors—that he be more direct and assertive, adopting the new manager’s own personal style. If appropriate, he might even offer the new manager an incentive of some sort for communicating constructively with him. I also suggested that Ben possibly ask the new manager how he wanted to be approached.

54

THE AUTHORITARIAN:

prefers to be in control. makes decisions quickly. focuses on the task at hand. is fast-paced. prefers brief, well-organized communication. wants to be in charge.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781583761564

Chapter Two: Mastering the Two Fundamental Factors of Any Influence Situation

Vengel, Alan Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

THE INFLUENCE EDGE

SE

LF

help you be able to anticipate the reaction of your influence subject and sort out how best to proceed, even when you’ve only got minutes to do it.

Before analyzing a situation, take a moment to think about yourself in relation to the other person and his situation. Put yourself in your subject’s shoes and listen to your own words of persuasion as though you have never heard them before. To better visualize your influence situation, examine Figure 1 on the left.

Figure 1. Influence Model

THE TWO FUNDAMENTAL FACTORS

OF ANY INFLUENCE SITUATION

Your Goal

• What do I want?

• What will make it clear to the other person?

• What assumptions am I making about the person(s) I need to influence?

The Other Person(s)

• What is their mindset?

• What is important to them?

• What is going on in their organization or department that might affect the situation?

JIM’S STORY

Of all the product developers at PraxisWare, an up-and-coming software maker, no one knows the products better, has built such good rapport with key customers, or has recruited as many talented coworkers as Jim Casey. For that reason, Jim’s boss, Sharon Grander, has recently chosen him to head up a major new software development project that could be the company’s breakthrough contribution to the market. She’s

See All Chapters

See All

Vaughn Robert (14)
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781576752708

13 The Future of Training

Vaughn, Robert Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

13

The Future of Training

“Map out your future, but do it in pencil.”

—Jon Bon Jovi quoted in Reader’s Digest

“I had hoped, vainly it turned out, that by talking to enough people I could discern some coherent picture of where the profession, if it is a profession, is headed.”

—Pat Galagan in T+D magazine

The professional trainer stays aware of trends and considers appropriate responses to developments that may affect the organization, the industry, the training profession, and the culture as a whole.

The business of training is changing, right along with the rest of the jobs in today’s world, and constant adaptations can be required.

“Be prepared” is more than just a scout motto; it’s essential to long term survival.

ᔢ ᔢ ᔢ

The December 2003 issue of T+D magazine ran a cover story titled

“The Future of the Profession Formerly Known as Training.”1 In it, the author asks if the field is about to kill off its brand equity [i.e., being known as “Training” for over 60 years] just as it begins to acquire some? A potential change in name for the business of training is just one of many things that may—or may not—happen in the next few years.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576752708

9 Facilities and Media Support

Vaughn, Robert Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

9

Facilities and

Media Support

“The best plan you can have for using media support is to pretend you don’t have any media support.”

—Gary Bunch

The professional trainer wants learners to be comfortable and focused during the training. Therefore, the environment must be matched to the nature and content of the lessons. Because simple lectures are among the least effective means of training, the professional trainer’s toolkit will include a variety of ways to support learning through media.

ᔢ ᔢ ᔢ

Good facilities design is a tremendous asset to effective training; poor facilities can really undermine an otherwise effective effort.

Media enhancement can do wonderful things for training—such as dramatically increasing student recall during a simple lecture— when it works right and is properly designed. However, designing a training program that depends wholly or even significantly on media support technology is risky. The professional trainer knows that both facilities and support media are means to an end, and neither one is sufficient unto itself to make training what it should be. This chapter discusses these final two components of the training design, facilities and media, before putting it all together into a formal plan for training in Chapter 10.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576752708

3 Determining Training Needs

Vaughn, Robert Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

3

Determining

Training Needs

“Never try to teach a pig to sing.

It wastes your time and annoys the pig.”

—Anonymous

The professional trainer begins with the basics: discovering specifically what skills and knowledge the organization needs in order to accomplish its mission, then finding out which of those skills the current or potential employees already bring with them. The difference between these skill sets defines the organization’s training need. This gap can best be identified by a systematic analysis, using various tools and techniques of the trade.

ᔢ ᔢ ᔢ

The opening quote for the chapter is one my uncle has hanging in a frame on his porch in Montana. I thought it was good advice.

Although a singing pig might get you on The Tonight Show with Jay

Leno, it’s probably not something that the world really needs. The preferred role of training is to provide something that the organization paying for the training really needs. Unfortunately, what’s needed and what’s not is seldom as obvious as a singing pig.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576752708

5 Developing Training Objectives

Vaughn, Robert Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

5

Developing

Training

Objectives

“Cheshire Puss, would you tell me, please, which way

I ought to walk from here?”

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.

“I don’t much care where—” said Alice.

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you walk,” said the Cat.

“—so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an explanation.

“Oh, you’re sure to do that,” said the Cat, “if only you walk long enough.”

—Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

The professional trainer knows that developing a training program, like any major activity, requires knowing where you’re going. Or, as Steven Covey puts it, you must “Begin with the end in mind.” Once the training requirements have been identified, they must be refined into explicit objectives.

ᔢ ᔢ ᔢ

As Alice learned in talking with the Cheshire Cat, deciding where to go is an essential first step in planning anything, whether business or training. Otherwise, one may end up—as the Walrus did—speaking of many things, but lacking coherence (“cabbages and sealing wax”?). Developing good training objectives is essential, tedious, and a step you may be tempted to skip. Don’t.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576752708

11 Conducting Training

Vaughn, Robert Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

11

Conducting

Training

“Plans are only good intentions unless they immediately degenerate into hard work.”

—Peter Drucker

Everything that has been developed so far is for naught unless the training is delivered effectively and the trainees take it back to the workplace and use it. Although the professional trainer attempts to do all stages of the process well, the actual delivery of the training is the culmination of all the effort. It is the most visible, challenging, rewarding, and—most trainers would say—the most fun part of the job.

ᔢ ᔢ ᔢ

This chapter deals with both delivering the training and improving transfer of training. Although an exhaustive treatment of these topics is beyond its scope, it distills some key points for the trainer and suggests a few practical references for those who need more detail.

Training delivery

Chapter 10 presents a number of suggestions for designing the training plan. As the opening quote for this chapter suggests, the next step is to put that plan into practice. Here are a few specific suggestions that can help you prepare to do that.

See All Chapters

See All

Load more