384 Chapters
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let's do

Rebecca Meacham University of North Texas Press PDF

64

let’s do

had hung low with angry black clouds and they were lost and exhausted, and when they saw the neon-lit “vacancy” sign, they both sighed. They had been young and in-love enough to laugh at the cobwebs, the fusty pictures of flowers outlined in yarn. They had slept under a quilt sewn from old dresses, curling into each other like puppies, or socks.

She had all but forgotten about that trip. A little sound escaped her throat.

“Good?” breathed the interviewer. His tongue probed her ear.

“So good,” Estelle said, raking her nails up his back. She glanced at her watch, though there was no reason to, nowhere that she had to be. By now, her husband was probably home from work, packing boxes, waiting for her to return so he could claim this lamp, that chair. Or he might be unpacking at his new apartment, the first floor of a Queen Anne in the crumbling heart of the city. She hadn’t seen it but he had described it in detail, the paint peeling like eggshells, the shutters askew. A fixer-upper, the kind of place she’d embraced when they first started out. Back then, Estelle had been the kind of girl who looked forward to things. There had been a voice in her head, the voice of countless

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Chapter 3 What Do We Want Our Students to Learn?

DuFour, Richard; DuFour, Rebecca Solution Tree Press ePub

Responding to the critical question, What do we want our students to learn? is the first step toward ensuring that all students learn at high levels. Responding to this question and identifying essential standards shifts the conversation of a teacher’s school, department, or team from an emphasis on teaching to an emphasis on learning. Agreement on what is essential helps teachers focus their time and expertise very specifically in the areas that will be most beneficial for student learning. With agreement in place on what matters most, teachers can be assured that they are applying their energies and professional expertise to what is absolutely essential to student success in the classroom and beyond.

Ensuring that students acquire the standards is different from merely covering the standards. Essential standards identify the what of the curriculum, but it remains the teachers’ responsibility to determine how to present the essential material most effectively. Nothing in the process of identifying the essential standards dictates pedagogy.

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Chapter 5 How Will We Respond When Some Students Don’t Learn and When Some Do?

DuFour, Richard; DuFour, Rebecca Solution Tree Press ePub

How a school responds when students don’t learn is where the rubber hits the road in the PLC process. A school can do everything described in the previous chapters of this book, including:

•Build consensus on its mission, vision, values, and goals

•Dedicate weekly collaboration time

•Form the right teams

•Identify essential learning outcomes

•Create and administer common assessments

•Identify students who have not mastered essential standards after core instruction

But at this point, if the school does not effectively help the students who are not learning at high levels, and extend the learning for the ones who are, then what has it truly achieved? The same students failing before the team started collaborating are probably still failing—the only difference is the teachers now fail these students as a team instead of individually.

Like all the elements of the PLC process, we are tight on the school’s systematic and collective response when students don’t learn but loose on how each school responds. The specific steps a school takes to intervene for struggling students will likely look different at an elementary school than at a high school, and different at a school that serves a large number of at-risk youth in comparison to a school where a majority of entering students have already mastered prerequisite skills and knowledge. Nevertheless, there are frequent, common questions we receive from PLC schools at all levels regarding how to best respond when students don’t learn. In this chapter, we share research-based answers that can help accelerate your school’s success on the PLC journey.

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Chapter Seven - The Royal Road to the Unconscious: Dream Analysis: When Do Dreams Tell You Something about Yourself?

Hall, Rebecca; Steiner, Hans Karnac Books ePub

When do dreams tell you something about yourself?

As humanity has known for thousands of years, our demons often come to visit at night, while we are sleeping. Across cultures, throughout history, and despite all of our waking life differences, once we lay our heads to rest each night human beings are united by one common experience—dreaming. We all know what it is like to close our eyes and be flooded with fantastical stories and movie-like imagery. Our dream life can be rich and vast, but what does it all mean? Some, like the ancient Greeks, believe that dreams have a prophetic quality. Others have experienced moments of great insight when fast asleep, like Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity or James Watson with the solution to the genetic puzzle. Many of us emerge each morning with a sense that there is a message hidden within our dreaming minds.

On average, each of us will spend one third of our lifetime asleep. And we are not alone in our need to slumber—all animals sleep. The question is, why? As Dr. Allan Rechtschaffen (1971) said, “If sleep does not serve an absolutely vital function, then it is the biggest mistake the evolutionary process ever made.” Despite how much time we spend nestled in bed, we do not yet conclusively know the function of sleep or dreaming.

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simple as that

Rebecca Meacham University of North Texas Press PDF

148

let’s do

Wearing the robe, she believes it’s possible for sorrow to be whipped into frothy peaks—to be made confectionery—and so dissolve, melt away like sugar in rain. It seems possible that in this way, her husband’s absence could shrink to granules, something easily evaporated. Something that would leave and actually stay gone, and not return for forgotten books or visits with the dog.

But he does not want to stay gone, her husband tells her at every chance he gets. He does not want the marriage to be over.

He calls from work every day and leaves rumbly, rambling messages. He e-mails her with haikus for their dog, with the requisite lines about sniffing, peeing, birding. He attempts good cheer on a limited budget. In their separation, he constantly surprises her with clichés, and this, along with everything, is very disappointing. Lila had expected more from him, something swashbuckling in reconciliation. But then, she had also expected a more innovative break-up. In fact, what enrages her lately is that the break-up has made her a cliché—a jilted wife, a spurned spouse, a Dear

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