3225 Chapters
Medium 9788131805220

ALLC12-3

Manish Goyal Laxmi Publications PDF

STATISTICAL COMPUTATION

9.

699

Assuming that we conduct an experiment with 8 fields planted with corn, four fields having no nitrogen fertiliser and four fields having 80 kgs of nitrogen fertilizer. The resulting corn yields are shown in table in bushels per acre :

Field

:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Nitrogen (kgs) x :

0

0

0

0

80

80

80

80

Corn yield y

:

120

360

60

180

1280

1120

1120

760

(acre)

(a) Compute a linear regression equation of y on x.

(b) Predict corn yield for a field treated with 60 kgs of fertilizer.

10. The means of a bivariate frequency distribution are at (3, 4) and r = 0.4. The line of regression of y on x is parallel to the line y = x. Find the two lines of regression and estimate value of x when y = 1.

11. The following results were obtained in the analysis of data on yield of dry bark in ounces (y) and age in years (x) of 200 cinchona plants : x y

Average

:

9.2

16.5

Standard deviation

:

2.1

4.2

Correlation coefficient = 0.84

Construct the two lines of regression and estimate the yield of dry bark of a plant of age 8 years.

12. Given N = 50, Mean of y = 44

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Medium 9781601323132

More Reliable Over-sampled Synthetic Data Instances by Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Minority Class

Robert Stahlbock, Gary M. Weiss, Mahmoud Abou-Nasr, Hamid R. Arabnia CSREA Press PDF

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Medium 9781601323170

Analysis of the Relationship Between Previous Ideas about the Physics Concepts and a Poor Student’s Performance in Classroom (FECS'14)

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

148

Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'14 |

Analysis of the relationship between previous ideas about the physics concepts and a poor student’s performance in classroom (FECS'14)

Guzmán R. Miguel A. 1, Rosete F. Juan C. 2, Estrada R. Felipe 3

1 Computer Engineering Department, Technological Institute of Queretaro,

2 Mechanical Engineerig Department, Technological Institute of Queretaro

Av. Tecnológico S/N Esq. M. Escobedo, PC 76000, Queretaro, Qro, México jc_rosete@yahoo.com.mx

3 Computer Engineering Department, Technological Institute of Queretaro

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Abstract. - This paper exposes the relationship between common misconceptions of the physics of movement in the classroom and the serial of previous ideas developed by engineering students along their life with the forced consequence of failed notes and further problems with lectures related with those topics.

This paper shows the results of a research developed into the Technological Institute of

Queretaro in order to identify typical misconceptions about the bodies’ behavior in static and dynamic conditions which could produce problems to develop models of our environment. With the obtained information a software system is developed in order to conduct a serial of computer experiments that confronts the student´s ideas with physics laws in order to force cognitive conflict within the student, leading it to the building of new concepts and a better understanding of the lecture.

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Medium 9788131805374

Ch_1

Hari Mohan Pandey Laxmi Publications PDF

1

S ETTING THE BASE FOR

‘C’ PROGRAMMING

I

f you have no prior idea of programming, software, translators, RAM etc. then you must not skip this chapter. This chapter sets your base for the programming.

The introduction part and section 1.2 gives you an idea of human language and computer language. It tells you how they are different and discuss all different types of computer languages like machine, assembly and high level.

Overview of programming discuss the fundamentals of programming like data, instruction and program, what a problem is from programming point of view, problem solving techniques: algorithms, pseudo code, flow charts etc. It also discusses subroutines and functions, programming methodology: bottom up and top down approach, types of programming: procedural, structured, object oriented etc.

A detailed discussion of translators like assembler, compiler and interpreter is given in section

1.4. Types of software, role of RAM in program execution, basic memory measuring units and brief introduction of Number system is given.

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Medium 9788131805220

ALLC9-4

Manish Goyal Laxmi Publications PDF

540

NUMERICAL METHODS AND STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES USING ‘C’

X=0.800000

Y=0.429650

Predicted Y=0.721307 Corrected Y=0.718820

X=1.000000

Y=0.718820

Notations used in the Program

(i) xn is the last value of x at which value of y is required.

(ii) x(i) is an array for prior values of x.

(iii) y(i) is an array for prior values of y.

(iv) yp is the predicted value of y.

(v) yc is the corrected value of y.

EXAMPLES

Example 1. Using Milne predictor-corrector method, obtain y(0.4) from the given set of dy tabulated values and

= y2 – x2. dx x

0

0.1

0.2

0.3

y

1

1.11

1.25

1.42

f

1

1.22

1.52

1.92

Sol. Here,

and

x0 = 0, x1 = 0.1, x2 = 0.2, x3 = 0.3 y0 = 1, y1 = 1.11, y2 = 1.25, y3 = 1.42 y0′ = 1, y1′ = 1.22, y2′ = 1.52, y3′ = 1.92, h = 0.1

Using predictor formula, y4 = y0 +

=1+

4h

(2y1′ – y2′ + 2y3′)

3

4 (0.1)

[2(1.22) – 1.52 + 2(1.92)] = 1.63466

3

Using y4, we obtain

y4′ = y42 – x42 = 2.51211

Now, applying corrector formula, y4(1) = y2 +

h

(y ′ + 4y3′ + y4′)

3 2

= 1.25 +

(0.1)

[1.52 + 4(1.92) + 2.51211] = 1.64040

3

Again,

y4(2) = y2 +

h

(y ′ + 4y3′ + y4(1)′) = 1.64103

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