70827 Chapters
Medium 9781574411805

Twenty-three—“If he’d only send out Linda Woodman.”

William T. Harper University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Twenty-three

August 2, 1974 • Day Ten

“If he’d only send out Linda

Woodman.”

—TDC Director, Jim Estelle, Jr.

During the preceding days of the siege, there were innumerable moments of panic for the hostages, but for Linda Woodman, the start of the tenth day was far more terrifying than anything she had been subjected to. And it had absolutely nothing to do with Fred

Carrasco, Rudy Dominguez nor Ignacio Cuevas. This panic attack was brought on by an act of God. On this

Friday morning the librarian was on guard duty at the broken door. It was about five o’clock, and she was speaking with inmate hostage Florencio Vera as

Ignacio Cuevas hovered nearby. Vera was, as usual, high on pain-killing drugs due to his recent surgery, and he asked Woodman to marry him when this was all over.

Stunned but not wanting to alienate another inmate, Woodman told him, “Oh, no. You’re too young.”

Vera was upset, saying her rejection was because he “was a Mexican.” He boasted about having thirty hours of college credit and asked, “If I went to college, would you like me better?”

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855755383

A transformational dialogue between the Fisherman and the gentle warrior

Karnac Books ePub

A transformational dialogue between the Fisherman and the Gentle Warrior

Barbara Hunter and John Lees

This chapter describes some aspects of the development of our tutor–student relationship on a Masters in Therapeutic Counselling course. (At the time of writing John was the course leader as well as a trained practitioner and an academic and, at the time of writing, Barbara was a student in training in the final year of the course whose research dissertation John was supervising.) In addition to our different roles, there were some other essential differences between us that we believe had a bearing on how the relationship unfolded. There was obviously a gender difference. However, there was also a cultural difference. Barbara is a pakeha from New Zealand (or Aotearoa), which is a country that is unique in fostering bi-cultural relations between the indigenous Maori people and the pakeha, the white population. The bi-cultural nature of her upbringing enabled Barbara to develop a spiritual perspective on life that incorporated a love for, and connection to, all things pertaining to the Earth. John, meanwhile, was born into Anglo-Saxon British culture. Having said this, he had a long-standing interest in different spiritual traditions; in particular, Rudolf Steiner's anthroposophy.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607053583

TWIN: Pixelville

Emily Cier C&T Publishing PDF

C

1/4 yard

1481–Banana

L

1/4 yard

1007–Ash

M

1

⁄3 yard

1387–White

N

1/4 yard

1479–Amber

⁄8 yard

1058–Cadet

⁄8 yard

1016–Berry

⁄3 yard

1005–Aqua

⁄8 yard

1058–Cadet

E

1/2 yard

1362–Stone

O

1

F

1/2 yard

275–Sable

P

1

G 11/4 yards 1080–Coal

H

I

J

Q

1

1/2 yard

136–Basil

Binding

7

1

⁄3 yard

7–Tomato

Backing 5 7⁄8 yards* 1362–Stone

1/4 yard

1060–Candy Blue

Batting 84˝ × 104˝

* You may need additional backing fabric if your fabric is less than 44˝ wide.

A

3. Layer, quilt,

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

6

3

4

4

6

4

2

2

6

First cut: Number of 11/2˝ × WOF strips to cut

and bind following the instructions in

Quilting and Finishing

(pages 11–15).

33

61

17

40

8

8

28

8

Second cut

Welcome to

Pixelville!

511/2˝ *

1

481/2˝ *

1

421/2˝ *

4

391/2˝

2

381/2˝

2

361/2˝

2

311/2˝

4

301/2˝

1

291/2˝

1

271/2˝

1

261/2˝

1

251/2˝

1

231/2˝

61

1

2

221/2˝

CUTTING

Personalize your quilt by embroidering the town name in black within the welcome sign

(color N). Enlarge the design below 150%.

26–Canary

D 13/4 yards 316–Tarragon

2. Assemble the quilt top using the assembly diagram

(pages 62 and 63).

⁄8 yard

7

K

pixelville

a Time: A Pixel Quilting

Primer (pages 6–11) for assembly guidelines.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253011329

Appendix D: Midterm and Final Exams

Howard Tinberg Indiana University Press ePub

 

Midterm Exam Essay Prompt:

III. Essay (50 points). Choose ONE.

A.

“The origins of humiliation,” writes Lawrence Langer in reference to survivors’ accounts, “were often dissimilar for men and women, because womanhood and manhood were threatened in various ways. But the ultimate sense of loss unites former victims in a violated world beyond gender.” In a clear and thoughtful essay, offer your thoughts on the role of gender in Shoah testimony. Please refer in detail to at least TWO of the works that we have read so far, one being our history text and the other drawn from the literature. You may, in addition, make use of the testimony that we have heard.

B.

The study of the Shoah, some have argued, begins at the intersection of memory and historical documentation. In other words, what we know of the Shoah is the product both of human memory and the historical record left by perpetrators and victims. In a clear and thoughtful essay, write about the contribution that each—memory and the historical record—plays. We suggest that you begin with definitions: What is memory? What is fact? In the study of the Shoah, where do the two converge? Where do they diverge or differ? Then proceed to compose an essay that refers in detail to at least TWO of the works that we have read so far, one being our history text and the other drawn from the literature. You may, in addition, make use of the testimony that we have heard.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781601323163

Quantum-Identity Equivalents of the Orthomodularity Law in Quantum Logic: Part 5

Hamid R. Arabnia, George A. Gravvanis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Foundations of Computer Science | FCS'14 |

115

Quantum-Identity Equivalents of the

Orthomodularity Law in Quantum Logic: Part 5

Jack K. Horner

P. O. Box 266

Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA

FCS 2014

Abstract

The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An

OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular lattice, which is an OL conjoined with the orthomodularity axiom (OMA). The rationalization of the OMA as a claim proper to physics has proven problematic, motivating the question of whether the OMA and its equivalents are required in an adequate characterization of QL. Here I provide an automated deduction of a quantum-identity-based equivalents of the OMA. The proofs may be novel.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters