43532 Chapters
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Medium 9781904658498

0: A Sort of Rock Bottom: An Opening Image

Daniels, Aaron B. Aeon Books ePub

The rite is over.

Various temple members mill about, wine in hand, making their wittiest conversation. Many firt, others posture, some watch. An overly exuberant laugh echoes from the other end of the room. Experimental music — something like the sound of a garbage truck picking up a dumpster behind a burning dance club — echoes of the hardwoods and high ceilings from a well-used stereo. The two modest rented rooms that make up this meeting place rest on the second foor of a late-Victorian ofce building near a bustling commercial street.

I chuckle as I look up to see the smoke detectors once again covered in plastic grocery bags, although the incense is rarely thick. Classic, I refect, although we may invoke the gods, these necessary little compromises remind us of our more humble context.

I usually enjoy the afterglow of these events, especially if the ritualists have done the ceremony well. Occasionally lines may be blundered, props go fying, and ‘Yakety Sax’ from the Benny Hill soundtrack would provide the perfect complement; but most of the time, the necessary gravitas carries the rite.

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Medium 9780253359551

0. Introduction—Toward a Logic of Culture

Umberto Eco Indiana University Press ePub

The aim of this book is to explore the theoretical possibility and the social function of a unified approach to every phenomenon of signification and/or communication. Such an approach should take the form of a general semiotic theory, able to explain every case of sign-function in terms of underlying systems of elements mutually correlated by one or more codes.

A design for a general semiotics(1) should consider: (a) a theory of codes and (b) a theory of sign production – the latter taking into account a large range of phenomena such as the common use of languages, the evolution of codes, aesthetic communication, different types of interactional communicative behavior, the use of signs in order to mention things or states of the world and so on.

Since this book represents only a preliminary exploration of such a theoretical possibility, its first chapters are necessarily conditioned by the present state of the art, and cannot evade some questions that – in a further perspective – will definitely be left aside. In particular one must first take into account the all-purpose notion of ‘sign’ and the problem of a typology of signs (along with the apparently irreducible forms of semiotic enquiry they presuppose) in order to arrive at a more rigorous definition of sign-function and at a typology of modes of sign-production.

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Medium 9780253012098

1

S. A. An-sky Indiana University Press ePub

“WATCH OUT, YOU SLOB!”

The young man slowly making his way down the middle of the street jumped to one side and turned to look in astonishment at the driver who had just threatened him with a fierce crack of his whip. Coming to a complete standstill, he watched with innocent curiosity as the carriage sped away.

The young man was about seventeen years old. Lean and lithe, he seemed taller than he really was. His dark complexion and softly outlined features still retained their youthful freshness; his little mustache, which had just appeared and looked as though it had been sketched onto his face with charcoal, conveyed a sincere, childlike, trusting expression, while his large eyes shone with inquisitive incomprehension and enthusiasm. His threadbare coat hung down to his ankles and was unbuttoned, the flaps billowing out in the shape of two large wings. Instead of a vest he wore a caftan buttoned up to his chin and encasing his neck. His crumpled velvet cap had slipped down the back of his head, exposing a large shock of uncombed hair. Only his long peyes were tucked behind his ears.1 In his hands he carried a small sack.

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Medium 9781780490861

1

Mackenzie, Roderick Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER ONE

I cannot seem to elude my deadly pursuer, even in the night darkness of the thick and tangled forest. Unfailingly he scents me out, and I am compelled to flee once again, ever deeper and further into the dense and dark wood. Eventually I come upon a wide river and wade through the water, but before I can make the far bank, I hear a branch snap nearby, and instinctively I lie down in the river. I am fortunate to be in a part of the water overhung and shaded by willow trees, because on this clear night the starry heavens emit such a radiant light, that the exposed water shines mercurial silver. Then I see him emerge from the forest, the eternal hunter, who never ceases to hound me. He is dragging something large, heavy, and sinister with frightening ease. He comes to the river's edge, and into the light of the stars but twenty feet from me, and I see that he holds the body of my stepfather by the neck with his left hand, and in his right hand is a rifle. My hunter pauses and sniffs the air for scent of me. I know he can smell me, he can smell my trembling fear. I know that he senses me, and I am concerned that he can hear my pounding heart. He stands quietly, patiently, sniffing, searching into the darkness, waiting for me to make a movement or a sound. My rifle is under the water in my left hand, my weak hand, and my right hand is pressed to the river bed to keep my nostrils just above the water. The tireless hunter is on the bank to my right. I raise my rifle very slowly above the water, and swing it cautiously towards my tormentor. I know I will only get one shot. The barrel wavers in my nervous hand, he perceives the danger, I squeeze the trigger and know instantly that I have killed him. My daemonic pursuer falls forward into the water, and he and the corpse of Dugald float away. With huge relief I clamber from the water onto the far bank, and find myself on a track which runs alongside the winding river. I am still extremely wary of danger, and keeping my rifle at the ready, I walk cautiously and quietly, following the flow of the sparkling star-spangled river. I hear a noise, and wait at the ready with my finger tight on the trigger. Out of the dark woods strides a woman and a group of seven men. I know this woman. She is a familiar, and I understand that she and the men are to come with me. I caution them to keep quiet, to be vigilant, as there are many dangers to be faced. On and on we walk until eventually we come to a stretch of the river where the bank is clear of trees. I stop to admire the ever-flowing water, and my heart fills to bursting with a nostalgia from the future. I say to the night woman, “Do you think that in years to come we will remember this moment, this marvellous silver river?” She says, “Look at the stars,” as she points to the sky. As I look up, the beauty of the heavens pierces my heart with a great force, and I am stunned by the grandeur and splendour of the Milky Way, how incredibly clear the stars are, how very many. She points to a section of the heavens and says, “Do you see those three stars, they are Hochma, Bimha, and Kether.” I am amazed by this, and say, “I thought that was Orion's Belt.” Then as I am staring at the sky, I perceive that some of the stars have become a deep blue. These blue stars are in patterns of even numbers, in twos, fours, or eights and I wonder what this mysterious phenomenon can mean. The men have become rowdy and talkative, and she says to me, “We had better be moving on.” I am deeply reluctant to leave the magnificent sky, but I know that she is right. After a few hours of steady walking, we come to a fork in the path, and I become uncertain as to which way to go. While I am debating with myself, the men carry on walking, laughing and talking down the left path, and the noise of them gradually recedes. I decide to try the path to the right as it could prove to be a short cut. She and I wade across the river and find a path on the other side, but after a little while we come upon two houses, and the path seems to cross their rear gardens. I am worried that there might be dogs about who could give us away or some other danger. I consider the idea of returning to the river and taking the path to the left, and then the dream ends.

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Medium 9781603442909

1

Buster, Noreen A. Texas A&M University Press ePub

Dale E. Bird, Kevin Burke, Stuart A. Hall, and John F. Casey

The formation of the Gulf of Mexico basin was preceded by the Late Triassic breakup of Pangea, which began with the collapse of the Appalachian Mountains (ca. 230 Ma; Dewey 1988). Gondwanan terranes of the southern part of the Gulf States, eastern Mexico, and the Yucatan Peninsula remained sutured onto the North American continent as it drifted away from the African-Arabian-South American continent (or Residual Gondwana, Burke et al. 2003). Early seafloor spreading in the central Atlantic Ocean, from about 180 Ma to 160 Ma, included 2 jumps of the seafloor-spreading center to new locations. The timing of the latter ridge jump (ca. 160 Ma) correlates with initial rifting and rotation of the Yucatan block.

The Gulf of Mexico ocean basin is almost completely bounded by continental crust. Its shape requires that at least one ocean-continent transform boundary was active while the basin was opening (Fig. 1.1). Evolutionary models differ between those that require the basin to open by rotation along a single ocean-continent transform boundary (counterclockwise rotation of the Yucatan block), and those that require the basin to open by rotation along a pair of subparallel ocean-continent transform boundaries (essentially northwest-southeast motion of the Yucatan block). Although many models have been proposed, most workers now agree that counterclockwise rotation of the Yucatan Peninsula block away from the North American Plate, involving a single ocean-continent transform boundary, led to the formation of the basin; many of these workers suggest that this rotation occurred between 160 Ma (Oxfordian) and 140 Ma (Berriasian-Valanginian) about a pole located within 5 of Miami, Florida (Humphris 1979; Shepherd 1983; Pindell 1985, 1994; Dunbar and Sawyer 1987; Salvador 1987, 1991; Burke 1988; Ross and Scotese 1988; Christenson 1990; Buffler and Thomas 1994; Hall and Najmuddin 1994; Marton and Buffler 1994). Evidence cited for this model of basin evolution includes: (1) paleomagnetic data from the Chiapas massif of the Yucatan Peninsula (Gose et al. 1982; Molina-Garza et al. 1992), (2) fracture zone trends interpreted from magnetic data (Sheperd 1983; Hall and Najmuddin 1994), (3) non-rigid tectonic reconstructions (Dunbar and Sawyer 1987; Marton and Buffler 1994), and (4) kinematic reconstructions making use of geological constraints, well data, and geophysical data such as seismic refraction, gravity, and magnetics (Pindell 1985, 1994; Christenson 1990; Marton and Buffler 1994).

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Medium 9781603442909

10

Buster, Noreen A. Texas A&M University Press ePub

James G. Flocks, Nicholas F. Ferina, and Jack L. Kindinger

This paper provides a summary of previous studies and a synthesis of the surficial geology of the MississippiAlabama shelf, located between the modern Mississippi River Delta and the Florida carbonate platform. Presently, sedimentation processes on the shelf are a function of prevailing winds and currents; however, in the past, the shelf was the focus of numerous delta cycles. Major episodes of deposition and erosion on the shelf have been primarily in response to oscillations in sea level. As sea level fell during the last ice age, deltas moved across the shelf to the shelf edge, incising river valleys across the middle shelf and creating stacked delta sequences on the slope. The delta complexes regressed during the last sea-level rise, infilling valleys while also providing sediments for erosion. Shoals were formed throughout these processes and are found along the shelf and modern shoreline. Data collected from the shelf, incorporated into this summary, include bathymetric, geophysical, and sediment cores. The purpose of the report is to integrate past studies with archived data to provide a comprehensive overview of the geology and geomorphology of the shelf. In addition, areas of further study are identified in the summary as a bulleted list of future needs and goals.

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Medium 9780253012098

10

S. A. An-sky Indiana University Press ePub

THE SYNAGOGUE SEEMED to Eizerman to be brighter, larger, and more dazzling than those in Miloslavka. When he and Uler walked in, evening prayers were already under way. Uler headed off somewhere and disappeared; Eizerman began to look around at the congregation and noticed several men among them wearing short jackets, dickeys, and trimmed side curls. No one paid them any special attention. . . . Turning around, Eizerman suddenly found himself looking right at Sheinburg. . . . He was standing by the east wall,1 next to an old Jew in a yarmulke2 wearing a long satin frock coat, and he was coldly, haughtily staring at Eizerman.

He was embarrassed and dropped his eyes, afraid to give away his terrible secret. But he couldn’t restrain himself from glancing again in Sheinburg’s direction. He was now engaged in conversation with his neighbor. He was talking rather loudly, with a note of indignation in his voice and with vigorous gestures. From the individual words that reached him, Eizerman concluded that Sheinburg was complaining about the head of the synagogue.

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Medium 9781780490861

10

Mackenzie, Roderick Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER TEN

Another seven days of spare rations are up. When my breakfast is brought to me I am suddenly overcome by emotion; the smell and taste of the oat porridge, buttered bread, and boiled eggs bring tears of gratitude welling up. I eat the eggshells with my bread. I was expecting the guards to take me for a shower, and then to a trial but many hours drag by and finally my lunch is brought to me. Chicken, beans, pumpkin, and mashed potato. I eat all the chicken bones and they give me heartburn. The afternoon slowly trickles by like cold bitumen, and still they do not fetch me. The next day I am surprised when after breakfast Steyn and Youngblood unlock the door. I assume that they have come to collect me for my shower, so I step forward towards the door but suddenly Youngblood punches me with a straight right to the chest which has me reeling backwards. They both rush into the cell and begin giving me a barrage of punches. All of a sudden Steyn exclaims, “Jesus Christ! Jesus fucking Christ!” and gagging, he runs from the cell. The runt rapidly follows him. The rotten stench of me and my putrid cell has taken them completely by surprise, and has totally defeated them. Steyn and Youngblood stand in the passage, gasping for breath; they are both a bit green in complexion and for a while they curse me with strangled voices. “You stink worse than a Kaffir! You filthy pig, you disgusting dirty fucking pig! We are not finished with you, prisoner! When you have been scrubbed we will come and deal with you, you arse wipe!” They lock me up with my appalling pain.

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Medium 9780946439768

1009-1914: Shirting Decisions

Muriel Gardiner Karnac Books ePub

Nw, having escaped from Dr. N.’s sanatorium and returned to Frankfurt with Dr. H., I left it to him to decide what should happen next. As there was no question of my going back to Professor Kraepelin, Dr. H. recommended that I consult Professor Ziehen in Berlin. So we remained only a few days in Frankfurt and then went to Berlin where, together with Dr. H., I visited Professor Ziehen. Professor Ziehen, like Professor Kraepelin, was of the opinion that the best thing for me would be a long period in a sanatorium for nervous disorders.

Following Professor Ziehen’s advice, we took up our winter quarters in the year 1908 in Schlachtensee, which one could reach from Berlin in half an hour by train. The medical director of the Sanatorium Schlachtensee was Dr. K., who made the impression of being a reasonable and rather balanced person. The patients of this sanatorium enjoyed more freedom than those of Dr. N.’s. When the prescribed daily treatment was completed, they could do whatever they wished the rest of the day. Naturally I lived in the institution, and my mother, my aunt, and P. were settled in a pension in a neighboring villa, I found this very pleasant, as I could make excursions and trips to Berlin with P., and I was also in regular contact with my mother.

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Medium 9780253019028

100,000 Men

IU Press Journals Indiana University Press ePub

“HUSH, HUSH,” HE said expectantly, jittery, running about the camp, the gaping hole in his brown shorts thoroughly visible, as was his entirely emaciated state. “Do you not hear them?” he turned around and around, looking about, pausing, staring intently at each face, as if to will them, to force them to apprehend what he was saying. “Do you hear them coming?” He breathed heavily. “They are coming! I saw them with my own eyes, my own two eyes! I swear they are coming.”

“Taidor, Taidor, Choul is having another of his fits again,” Alek said to her husband, stating the obvious.

Taidor looked on, unable to shake off the melancholy expression on his visage. Of course he knew there was no one coming. He was the sober one, calm, collected, resigned to fate without complaint. And he knew there was definitely no one coming. He hated the hopeless optimism of Choul. Even from their days at the university in Khartoum, Choul had entertained and nursed this ridiculously hopeless idealism. “They are coming where?” he scoffed. “Who? Who is coming?” He shook his head sarcastically and proceeded to scratch his unkempt hair.

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Medium 9781576750698

100. So, Do you Really Need a Speakerphone in the Bathroom?

Dinnocenzo, Debra Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

212

100

101 Tips for Telecommuters

So, Do You Really Need a

Speakerphone in the Bathroom?

There was a cartoon published a few years ago that depicted the typical “wired” businessperson on vacation at the beach, completely tethered to all the equipment we thought would free us: telephone, computer, fax machine, printer, etc. Now, of course, cellular phones,

PDAs, and computers are wireless, so you can still be technologically tethered on vacation, in your car, during time with your family, on airplanes, in your home, at social events, on the weekend, or just about anywhere (if you’re not careful). How do you determine when technology threatens your work/life balance? For all the advantages we gain from the gizmology that makes telecommuting possible, there are some downsides you should be aware of and manage proactively.

What are the warning signs that you may be overdoing the use of technology in your work and your life? The key indicator is you.

Here are some warning flags to look for:

2 You’re in a restaurant or other public place and a cell phone or pager starts signaling. It’s not unusual for several people to begin checking their pockets or briefcases to see whether the signal is coming from their equipment. If you’re scrambling to determine which of your multiple pieces of wireless technology it is, you’re probably packing too much technology for one person.

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Medium 9781576750698

101. Make Telecommuting Work Well for You

Dinnocenzo, Debra Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

214

101 Tips for Telecommuters

Are you using technology to its best advantage in your life? Are there new or upgraded tools you can acquire (e.g., integrated digital phone/pager, PDA) that will simplify your life, lighten your load when you’re away from the office, or save you precious time?

If you haven’t done so for a while, browse through some catalogs, magazines, Web sites, or retail outlets that cater to the technological needs of telecommuters, virtual offices, or road warriors. Assess your current technology needs and consider how new technology tools

(or new ways of using your existing tools) can help you.

T R A N S F E R

101

I T

P R O M P T L Y

T O

I M P R O V E

P E R F O R M A N C E

Make Telecommuting

Work Well for You

When I reflect on why telecommuting has been so valuable to me— to my happiness, sense of balance, emotional and psychological wellbeing—several thoughts come to mind. Initially, though, I’m struck by the reminiscent feeling of leaving my house early in the morning before the sun crested the horizon, knowing I wouldn’t return to my little sanctum of serenity until it was dark again. In those days BT

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Medium 9780253010766

10 1912: A German Tour

Galina Kopytova Indiana University Press ePub

UPON THEIR RETURN from the Latvian coast, the Heifetz family moved from their apartment on Voznesensky Prospekt to building 8-10 Bolshaya Masterskaya Street, a tall corner building facing Torgovaya Street. This was a familiar place for Jascha since it was just across the street from where he had lived with his father two years earlier. The building was new, and some final work on the inside continued for almost a year after the Heifetzes arrived. In one direction the building looked onto the dome of the synagogue, and in the other, beyond the Kryukov Canal, one could see the back of the Mariinsky Theater and also the conservatory, which was just a five-minute stroll along Torgovaya Street. That year, an amusement park with roller coasters, a Ferris wheel, swings, and other attractions opened in the nearby Demidov Gardens on Ofitserskaya Street, but Jascha had little free time for the many temptations. Leading up to important performances, Auer paid special attention to his students and made every effort to help them perfect their concert programs.

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Medium 9781912567423

10. (1918) The Wolf Man (the Primal Scene)

Meltzer, Donald Harris Meltzer Trust ePub

CHAPTER TEN

The Wolf Man (the primal scene)

The case of the ‘Wolf Man’ is to my mind the most important case history in the whole of psychoanalytic literature and in all of Freud's work; for the Wolf Man was what might be called an encyclopaedia of psychopathology. Moreover, I believe this particular case was Freud's premier clinical experience because all the work that follows seems to be deeply involved with it. It opened up the phenomenon of the primal scene to him. Now this was something which Freud had in fact conceptualized very early on, but which – probably owing to his diminished interest in the idea of specific aetiology – he later put aside. It was not until he was faced with the Wolf Man and his extraordinary dream and the evidence of the impact of the dream on the child's development, that Freud took it up again. In a way it is this theory that gives proper psychoanalytic form to all of Freud's theories about sexuality; for although they had been, as it were, announced in the Three Essays on Sexuality, they were not built upon a foundation of psychoanalytic data, but merely from psychoanalytical modes of thought applied to ordinary medical and psychiatric data.

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Medium 9781574414349

10. 1968 Tet Offensive

Lam Quang Thi University of North Texas Press ePub

10

1968 TET OFFENSIVE

On January 30, 1968, the second day of the new Year of the Monkey, at 2:00 AM., my aide awakened me and reported that the VC had simultaneously attacked the capital cities of Vinh Long, Vinh Binh, and Kien Giang. The situation was particularly critical in Vinh Long where the enemy occupied most of the city and part of the airport, which was defended by a U.S. Army aviation unit. The 1968 Tet Offensive in the Mekong Delta had begun. In the evening of January 29, General Manh, IV Corps Commander, had called to inform me that the VC had attacked a few cities in Military Region II, and that I should take necessary measures against a possible enemy attack in the Delta. Consequently, I ordered that all leaves for the traditional Tet festivities be suspended immediately and all units put in the highest alert status.

For the Vietnamese, Tet is Christmas, New Year, and Thanksgiving combined. Tet is the occasion for people to relax after one year of hard work, for the peasants to thank “Heaven and Earth” for a good harvest and to celebrate, for the members of the family to get together and to pay respect to the ancestors, and mostly for the children to put on new clothes and to receive “lucky money” in small red envelopes from their parents and friends of the family. Thus, it was customary for the government and the VC to declare unilaterally a three-day truce on this occasion so that soldiers could celebrate this important holiday with their families after one year of fighting. Normally, one-third of the soldiers in each ARVN unit would rotate to spend time with their loved ones on this important holiday.

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