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Medium 9781574414929

Potatoes, Grains and Pasta

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

And Then Potatoes, Grains, and Pasta

There is nothing that smells better than potatoes baking. Idaho potatoes are the popularized ones, but California and Maine produce a fine type for baking or any other style of cooking. For me, Idaho takes the lead for baking because of its shape—long, flat, quicker cooking than the round kind. Just scrubbed and placed in a 350° oven and baked until done, about 1 hour, but timed to come out when you are ready to sit down; or rubbed in vegetable oil and salt; or wrapped in brown paper or aluminum foil to keep them from cooling off. Just bake them, and the whole family will succumb—even the curvaceous ones. Serve with sweet butter or sour cream, chopped chives, grated cheese, crisped salt pork—or all of them.

POTATOES ON THE HALF SHELL

For 6

6 Idaho potatoes

1/4 cup milk or cream

1 egg

4 tablespoons butter

Salt and pepper

1 tablespoon chopped green onions [optional]

[Preheat oven to 350°.] Bake the potatoes, cut in half lengthwise and scoop out the potato. Mash, while hot, with the milk, beaten egg, and butter and beat until fluffy. Season with salt and pepper, and onion if you wish. Spread the shell with [additional] butter and pile lightly and high into it. Sprinkle with a smidgen of nutmeg or paprika or grated Parmesan cheese.* Bake until brown on top.

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Medium 9781574413076

Appendix D Articles

Stephen Gamble and William Lynch University of North Texas Press PDF

APPENDIX

D

Articles

French Horn Playing

By Dennis Brain

The Conductor 3, issue 10 (October 1954): 3, 8.

The Quarterly Journal of the National Association of Brass Band Conductors1

Dennis Brain, at the age of thirty-three, stands at the head of his profession. French horn playing and his name are almost synonymous. Son of Aubrey Brain, also a famous horn player,

Dennis has been the principal soloist of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra since 1946. He has played concertos in Switzerland, France, Germany, Holland, Italy and U.S.A. and has recorded most major works for the horn. A number of works has been specially written for him, notably those by Benjamin Britten, Hindemith and Gordon Jacob. He has also been awarded the coveted Cobbett medal of the Worshipful Company of Musicians.

Bandsmen will gratefully recall his wonderful playing at the concert following the “Daily

Herald” Contest at the Empress Hall in 1952 when he was accorded a tremendous ovation by the crowded audience.—Ed.

To write an article for a Brass Band Journal on an instrument which does not appear in a Brass

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Medium 9780253356888

9. Post-1945 and Conclusion

Anthony Clayton Indiana University Press ePub

SINCE THE END OF THE SECOND World War little combat in woods and forests has taken place in Europe and none in North America. Such combat was, however, often the subject of theory and exercise by cold war military commanders. Actual combat on a relatively small scale took place first in Greece from 1945 to 1948, in which communist partisans of the National People’s Liberation Army made use of woods in the mountain areas, and, forty-five years later, in the conflict following the collapse of Yugoslavia. In Croatia, Bosnia, and Kosovo ethnic guerrilla units or bands used forests as bases. In the long Northern Ireland campaign British Special Forces would track and hunt down Irish nationalist groups in the border woods. On a larger scale, in an area on the extreme edge of Europe, forest fighting followed the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Chechen insurgency. In Vietnam the U.S. Army engaged in some forest fighting similar to that in earlier European combat.

During the long cold war, confrontation between the land and air forces of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the Warsaw Pact forces on the inner German border between West and East Germany, led to much theoretical writing and study. Massive military forces would be stationed on each side of the border. The Soviet and Warsaw Pact forces, composed essentially of shock armored and mechanized infantry formations, were planning for fast-moving strategic breakthroughs in which forest areas were to be bypassed in a dash for the Rhine and the English Channel. Both sides saw forests as having subsidiary use in such a campaign. NATO planning for a Soviet attack appreciated that certain woods and forests, while providing concealment and thick cover, would also channel the Soviets’ advance along particular routes, slowing momentum which would perhaps lead to congestion and thus enable a hammer-and-anvil defense plan. The NATO plan also provided for parties to remain behind in woods after a Soviet Army advance, observing the movements of Soviet second-echelon formations and reporting to NATO headquarters by means of short-burst signal systems. Soviet planning, particularly in the last two decades of the cold war, was more ambitious, reflecting Soviet thinking on maneuver warfare, itself much influenced by Marxist concepts of the essential unity of front and rear. Special Forces units and subunits were to land behind NATO lines and, after assembling, move out from woods and forests to strike at NATO lines of communication, headquarters, ordinance parks, airfields and airstrips, and radar installations, thereby paralyzing NATO forward units. Helicopter developments in the 1970s and 1980s offered new opportunities for battlefield mobility; helicopters could provide not only for the safe bypassing of forests but also for rapid surprise lifts and troop insertions, thereby using forests and woods to a unit’s advantage in either attack or defense.1 Fortunately all these plans remained on paper.

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Medium 9781855750746

Chapter Twelve

Rhode, Eric Eric Rhode Ebook ePub

The rite of passage in psychoanalysis. Liminal phenomena, and the persecutory emergence of symbol from sign on the threshold of the depressive position. The need to hold on to a psychotic or primitive intuition that is concerned with an underlying and impersonal geometric order to experience. “A substrate to an inner world anterior to the reach of metaphor.”

From his reading of Schreber’s memoirs, Freud understands Schreber to have experienced (in a remarkable insight) the stage in remission of certain psychic cycles of destruction and regeneration as peopled by “improvised beings”.

[He) became convinced of the immanence of a great catastrophe, of the end of the world […] He himself was “the only man left alive”, and the few human shapes he saw [..] he explained as being “miracled-up, cursorily improvised men” [Freud, 1911c [1910), p. 68).

Lévi-Strauss has indicated how the need to improvise characterizes primitive life in general and in making this point he has referred to the concluding sentence of Boas’ (1940) essay on the Thompson Indians: “It would seem that mythological worlds have been built up, only to be shattered again and that new worlds were built from the fragments” (pp. 407-424). Lévi-Strauss proposes that thought of a scientific nature is thought capable of forming models that are unrestricted by the notion of function. Scientific thought, for instance, is able to use the concept of infinity. Primitive thought, on the other hand, depending on what Whitehead called the fallacy of misplaced concreteness, uses a sign system that is exigent, finite in scope and similar to the practice of a court etiquette. It re-cycles its exigent resources indefinitely; and it depends on the objet trouvé. It finds its model in magic, which Lévi-Strauss (following Mauss) sees as operating within a closed treasury of devices.

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Medium 9781576753415

4. Concepts for Diagnosing Performance

Richard Swanson Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

4

Concepts for Diagnosing Performance

Performance Diagnosis Concepts

Conclusion

“Y

ou know it when you see it!” can be said about a smooth-running organization—or an inefficient one. It is amazing how quickly an outsider, on entering an organization, can tell you that a place is or is not functioning well. Even so, the mere detection that the ship isn’t moving or that the crew is on the edge of mutiny doesn’t qualify a person as a performance diagnostician.

In a single day recently, I had the experience of being a consumer of services provided by an automobile repair organization and a health care organization. Within minutes of encountering each organization,

I was blasted with messages. The automobile repair station, along an interstate highway, was staged with personnel who treated me courteously, wore clean uniforms, had a professional manner, worked as a team, and relied on a sophisticated technological backup system. The health care organization I visited later that day could have learned a great deal from the repair station. The egotism of the staff, combined with their poor work systems and inept communication, hit me soon after entering the door. But analysis at this level does not represent performance diagnosis and will do little or nothing to improve the situation.

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Medium 9781576754931

Page_300

David Cooperrider Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub
Medium 9781855754034

18. Jung and neuroscience: the making of mind

Ann Casement Karnac Books ePub

Margaret Wilkinson

As I consider the question “Who owns Jung?” I find that, in contrast to Jung ("thank God I am Jung and not a Jungian"), I have an increasing sense of pleasure that I am a Jungian, that is a “contemporary Jungian”, living in this particular period when contemporary neuroscience offers analytical psychologists the opportunity to explore the mind-brain relationship anew in the hope of grounding both theory and clinical practice in the science of the 21st century. In the discussion after Jung's Second Tavistock Lecture Bion asked Jung whether he considered that there was a connection between mind and brain. Jung replied “The psychic fact and the physiological fact come together in a peculiar way … We see them as two on account of the utter incapacity of our mind to think them together ( Jung 1935, par. 135-136). As Solomon (2000, pp. 126-137) and Casement ( 2001, pp. 133-134) have predicted, the continuing relevance of Jung's insights are being confirmed by research into neuroscience just as so many aspects of his thought remain relevant in our modern world.

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Medium 9781855756038

TRANSFORMATIONS: CHANGE FROM LEARNING TO GROWTH (1965)

Bion, Wilfred R. Karnac Books PDF

TRANSFORMATIONS:

CHANGE FROM LEARNING

TO GROWTH

1965

Bion_05.indb 115

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Transformations: Change from Learning to Growth was first published in 1965 by William Heinemann Medical Books, London, and reprinted in 1984 as Transformations by Karnac Books, London. It was included in Seven Servants, published in 1977 by

Jason Aronson, New York.

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EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION

Completing the trilogy of the epistemologically based papers published in the 1960s, Transformations (1965) followed on from Learning from Experience (1962) and Elements of Psycho-Analysis (1963).

Although Bion had meant Transformations to stand alone, as it were, he expressed some regret in his introduction that his intention that the book could be read without reference to the previous two works had not been achieved.

Bion, a painter himself, begins this book with a description of a painter who sees a field of poppies and decides to paint it. The painting represents the field of poppies. Bion makes the point that for the painting to represent adequately the field of poppies something must effect the representation by remaining invariant between the two ‘fields’ – that of the poppies and that of the marks on the canvas perceived by the human eye. The unaltered group of elements that enables this to take place Bion calls invariants. Another way to put it is that the painter has rendered on the canvas elements that are abstracted from his perceptions of the field of poppies. In Chapter 5 Bion refers to principles of abstraction described by Bertrand Russell in the Principles of Mathematics. There is also a relevant passage by Russell (1992) in his Introduction to Wittgenstein’s Tractatus:

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Medium 9780253329110

IV. The Postwar Era

James Von Geldern Indiana University Press ePub

 

THE PROLIFIC POGODIN WROTE THIS SCRIPT FOR THE MOST FAMOUS STALINIST POSTWAR FILM, RELEASED AT A TIME OF SEVERE SHORTAGES AND THE RAVAGES OF RECOVERY, AND DIRECTED BY IVAN PYRIEV—MASTER OF THE GLOSSY RURAL MUSICAL COMEDY. IT IS A HORSE OPERETTA ABOUT COSSACK COLLECTIVE FARMERS COMPETING IN A “COUNTRY FAIR” VENUE (LIKE RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN’S STATE FAIR, 1945) AND A COUPLE OF STANDARD LOVE PLOTS (DASHA SHELEST-KOVYLEV, VORON-PERESVETOVA). ISAAK DUNAEVSKY’S BRIGHT SCORE MAKES THIS A LIGHT-HEARTED FROLIC. BUT FROM THE OPENING CHORUS AMID FIELDS OF GRAIN TO THE TRADE PAVILIONS AND BOOTHS BULGING WITH CONSUMER GOODS, COSSACKS GAVE A DISTORTED PICTURE OF THE ECONOMIC LIFE OF RURAL RUSSIA. As THESE EXCERPTS SUGGEST, THE SIMPLE PLOT TWISTS AROUND THREE TENSIONS: A CONTEST BETWEEN TWO COLLECTIVE FARMS, A DIFFICULT LOVE BETWEEN THE CHAIRMAN AND CHAIRWOMAN OF THOSE FARMS, AND THE LOVE OF DASHA FOR A MEMBER OF THE OPPOSING FARM.

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Medium 9781475819250

The Type of Teacher I Don’t Want to Be: Constructing Teacher Identity Through Converse Descriptions and Student Voice

Teacher Education and Practice R&L Education ePub

BETH A. WASSELL

ABSTRACT: This article illustrates how narratives provided by Ian, a beginning science and mathematics teacher, and by some of his urban high school students contribute to Ian’s process of identifying. Through the use of narrative inquiry, I demonstrate how the narratives use converse descriptions to portray Ian’s identity in terms of the type of teacher that he does not want to be. Analyzed with support from other forms of data, the narratives show congruence between Ian’s designated identity and his actual identity (Sfard & Prusak, 2005). Throughout the article, I emphasize the importance of beginning teachers’ process of identifying and its significance for teacher preparation and induction, especially for preparing preservice teachers to work with diverse student populations.

How do individuals begin to conceptualize who they will be and what they will do as classroom teachers? Once beginning teachers are able to elucidate who they think that they will be, what they will value, or what they will do in the classroom, how does this compare with what they actually do as in-service teachers? In this article, I use narratives provided by Ian, a beginning science and mathematics teacher, and by some of his students to analyze his process of identifying. Using the narratives, I illustrate the coherence between the Ian’s designated identity, or who he hopes to be as a teacher, and his actual identity as a beginning teacher.

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Medium 9781782200567

Chapter Three - The Analytic Attitude

Juan Tubert-Oklander Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER THREE

The analytic attitude

The analyst's contribution to the analytic situation

In the previous chapter, I have made a case in favour of considering the analytic situation as an instance of interaction—both conscious and unconscious—between analyst and patient. Now, “interaction” means “mutual or reciprocal action or influence”. This represents a serious questioning of the usual allegation that “there is no room for action in psychoanalysis”. It also implies that the analyst's participation in the analytic situation goes far beyond his or her conscious and purposeful technical interventions.

Such contentions are inevitably disquieting for analysts and patients alike, since they suggest that the former might not be in full control of the situation while conducting an analysis. But, if there is any chance that this might be true, we should confront it, try to understand it, and benefit from the ensuing knowledge.

From this point of view, the analyst contributes to the analytic situation in three different but interrelated ways. In the first place, there is the mutual interaction, which is mainly unconscious, that is set in motion whenever two people meet in any given situation. In this, psychoanalysis is no different from any other relationship.

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Medium 9781855754034

17. Who owns the unconscious? Or Why psychoanalysts need to “own” Jung

Ann Casement Karnac Books ePub

Jean Knox

The word “own” can mean two different things. It may imply possession, ownership or it may mean to acknowledge something as important and valuable. Jung himself did seem to fear that Freud wanted to own him, in the sense of possessing him. Much of the acrimony in the final letters between Freud and Jung arose partly from Jung's struggle to assert his intellectual independence; Freud responded with injured dignity, refuting the charge of intellectual tyranny (Freud & Jung, 1974, p. 492). However Jung's frustration with Freud finally erupted in the vitriolic letter of December 18th, 1912, in which he castigates Freud for “sniffing out all the symptomatic actions in your vicinity, thus reducing everyone to the level of sons and daughters who blushingly admit the existence of their faults” (ibid., p. 535). Their personal friendship and professional collaboration could not survive Jung's increasing resentment over Freud's resistance to “own”, in the sense of acknowledge, any of Jung's original contributions to psychoanalytic theory (Shamdasani, 2003, pp. 50-51).

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Medium 9781855754447

19: Void as a gender experience:

Paul W. Ashton Karnac Books ePub

The breath of life is in the sharp winds of change
mingled with the breath of destruction.
But if you want to breathe deep sumptuous life
Breathe it all alone, in silence, in the dark,
And see nothing.

(D.H. Lawrence)

Wilma, a woman in her mid-fifties, was not empty of herself because she was full of her mother, she was empty of herself because she was empty both of her mother and of any sense of being a loveable person in the world. She had, by this age, a tenuous sense of identity, which would disintegrate when she felt excluded, particularly by one of her children.

Her father had died when she was two months old, a maternal aunt when she was one, and her maternal grandfather when she was aged four. In addition to these catastrophes, which had plunged her mother into depression, Wilma had had to deal with a new stepfather when she was two and a new sibling when she was three. Her mother became an alcoholic and her stepfather was prone to aggressive, even violent, outbursts. Sustained to a certain extent by the house in which she had lived until the age of eleven, when the family moved to another town she expressed her worry that she might now die.

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Medium 9781910444054

CAPÍTULO 9 - El espacio de los sueños y el espacio analítico

Ogden, Thomas Ediciones Karnac ePub (DRM)

En este capítulo, se considerarán los aspectos de dos formas de espacio potencial: el espacio de los sueños y el espacio analítico. Soñar se entiende como una comunicación interna en la que una presentación de sueños es generada por un aspecto del yo y entendida por otro aspecto del yo. La presentación de los sueños como cosa en sí es traída a un proceso dialéctico por otro aspecto del yo a través de cuyo proceso se generan los significados simbólicos y la experiencia de los sueños. El esquizofrénico, cuando es incapaz de mantener un proceso psicológico dialéctico, transforma la presentación de los sueños en una alucinación.

El espacio analítico se considera un estado intersubjetivo, generado por el paciente y el terapeuta, en el que se puede jugar con los significados y también pueden ser considerados, comprendidos, etc. La identificación proyectiva del paciente es una forma “directa” de comunicación que socava la capacidad del terapeuta para mantener un proceso psicológico dialéctico. El terapeuta socava el espacio analítico cuando sus intervenciones constituyen “declaraciones de hechos”. Esto último contribuye a un embargo del dominio de los significados y la experiencia personales.

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Medium 9781574410358

Fort Concho

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor University of North Texas Press PDF

80•Fort ConchoTOURIST INFORMATION(When possible please call ahead to be sure these services are still available.)Fort Concho (915/481-2646/657-4444)Points of interest:Twenty-three original and restored fort structures(National Historic Landmark). Authentically refurbished exhibit buildings include a restored headquarters, soldiers barracks, officer's quarters, chapel/school, and post hospital. Exhibits tell the story of the fort, the Indian campaigns and of SanAngelo. Open Tuesday-Saturday, 10-5, Sunday 15. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years.Call the Chamber of Commerce for the dates ofChristmas at Fort Concho.Four living history units: Fort Concho Infantry, Sixteenth Regiment, Co. F, (ca. 1880); Fort ConchoCavalry, Fourth Regiment, Co. D, (ca. 1872); FortConcho Buffalo Soldiers, Tenth Regiment, Co. D,(ca. 1878), who also travel to perform in other communitiesMuseum and bookstoreSan Angelo (800-375-1206/915-653-1206) population:87,980Lakes and rivers:Lake Nasworthy and the Concho River Walk

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