43532 Chapters
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Medium 9781907099526

Burgundy Jura

Michelin Michelin ePub

BURGUNDY JURA

Burgundy’s unity is based more on history than on geography. Fortunately located on the trade route linking northern Europe to the Mediterranean, the territory was consolidated by its great Dukes in the 15C. It comprises a number of pays of varying character, though its heartland lies in the limestone plateaux stretching eastwards from the Auxerre area and terminating in escarpments, which drop down to the Saône Valley. To the east the Jura’s limestone uplands run in a great arc for some 240km/150mi from Rhine to Rhône, corresponding roughly to the old province of Franche-Comté.

Highlights

1 17C Ducal Palace at Dijon

2 6C BC grave goods at Trésor de Vix

3 The 1C Abbaye de Fontennay

4 Flemish-Burgundian Hospital, Hôtel Dieu, at Beaune

5 The Benedictine Abbaye de Cluny

Geography – Of the Burgundian escarpments La Côte is the most renowned, with its slopes producing some of the world’s finest wines. To the north is the Morvan, a granite massif of poor soils, with scattered hamlets and extensive forests. Further north and west the Nivernais stretches to the Loire and to the south the lower reaches of the Saône are bordered by the broad Bresse plain. The limestone uplands of the Jura were folded into long parallel ridges and valleys by the pressure exerted on them in the Alpine-building period. This is a verdant landscape with extensive forests and vast upland pastures.

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Medium 9781855757233

Chapter One: “I’m just wild about Harry!” A psychoanalyst reflects on his relationship with his dog

Marcus, Paul Karnac Books ePub

“It really explains why we can love an animal … with such extraordinary intensity; affection without ambivalence, the simplicity of a life free from the almost unbearable conflict of civilization, the beauty of an existence complete in itself … Often when stroking Jo-fi [Freud’s dog] I have caught myself humming a melody which, unmusical as I am, I can’t help recognizing as the aria from Don Giovanni: ‘a bond of friendship unites us both’”

Sigmund Freud

Like Freud, and, for that matter, like any devoted dog owner you happen to meet on the street or in the park, I love my dog. “He is my best friend,” I often say to people. Harry, a one-year-old Cocker Spaniel, was a “rescue” dog, a code word for a pup that was given up by his owner and either left on the street or given to a dogs’ home. In Harry’s case, he was abused and abandoned, a stray found on the Brooklyn side of the Belt Parkway, starving, filthy with fleas and tics, and very frightened. According to the foster lady, Shirley, a remarkable woman from whom I obtained Harry and whose life mission is to rescue Cocker Spaniels from certain death on the street and find them a good home, Harry was a sweet dog, though a traumatized one. When we first met Harry in her Queens, New York home, he was still very skinny and fearful, with long floppy ears and sad eyes. Nevertheless, within a few minutes it was clear that both my wife and I, a child and adult psychoanalyst, respectively, felt a summoning call from Harry: “Help me, love me, take good care of me.”

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Medium 9781936763252

Chapter 13 Plays Aloud

Patricia M. Cunningham Solution Tree Press ePub

CHAPTER 13

Plays Aloud

Students love plays, and you can capitalize on their affinity for them and provide repeated reading practice required to build reading fluency and self-confidence. Plays Aloud lessons also help students understand how to read drama and differentiate it from other genres. As you lead students to analyze characters’ emotions and read lines with appropriate expression, you are teaching them how to infer characters’ feelings and motivations. As with the Poetry Aloud lesson framework in chapter 12, Plays Aloud builds fluency with a focus on expressive reading. This lesson framework also begins with echo reading and then moves to choral reading.

Reading plays several times during the echo and choral reading parts of the lessons helps students learn to read with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. After the echo reading, students summarize what happens in each scene, and the teacher clarifies unfamiliar words and phrases. Summarizing what happens in each scene helps students pay attention to what is happening in each part of the play.

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Medium 9780253014221

3. The Masterpiece

Sofia Moshevich Indiana University Press ePub

The period from 1946 to 1953 (the year of Stalin’s death) saw a new terror, in which repression of the arts reached an apogee. Shostakovich was among the composers condemned in the Communist Party’s 1948 “antiformalism” decree. Following the publication of this decree, he was removed from his teaching positions, and a number of his works were banned. Through these years, Shostakovich had to write mostly “for the drawer” and published only his weaker but politically correct pieces. With one notable exception—the Twenty-Four Preludes and Fugues—his best compositions of the period, including the Violin Concerto No. 1, op. 77 (1947–48), the song cycle From Jewish Folk Poetry, op. 79 (1948), and the String Quartet No. 4, op. 83 (1949), were premiered only after Stalin’s death.

In July 1950, Shostakovich served as a juror for the piano competition at the Bach Bicentennial Festival in Leipzig. It was this festival, which included a performance of the complete Well-Tempered Clavier by Tatiana Nikolayeva (the eventual winner of the competition), that inspired Shostakovich to compose his own cycle of twenty-four preludes and fugues. Yet, in addition to this external inspiration and a desire to sharpen his compositional technique, Shostakovich may have had another deeply personal reason for embarking on the cycle. Lawrence Cosentino writes that against the “backdrop of an unremitting siege, the twenty-four preludes and fugues emerged as a highly improbable, extraordinarily bold, and shockingly profound act of self-healing.”1

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Medium 9781780643373

12: The Changing Fortunes of Woodland Birds in Temperate Europe

Kirby, K.J.; Watkins, C. CABI PDF

12 

The Changing Fortunes of Woodland

Birds in Temperate Europe

Shelley A. Hinsley,1* Robert J. Fuller2 and Peter N. Ferns3

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, UK; 2British Trust for Ornithology, Thetford, UK; 3School of Biosciences,

Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

1

12.1  Introduction

We explore what is known of the history of woodland birds in Europe and how they have responded to changes in woodland extent, composition and management. Beyond the simple availability of habitat, woodland structure is a critical factor in species survival and distribution. Despite the huge transformation of postglacial forests, no woodland bird species has actually become extinct, and with forest cover now increasing, as long as diverse habitat structures can be maintained across a range of scales, forest birds should not only survive, but also thrive.

12.2  The Birds of the Early

Holocene

Our knowledge of the bird fauna of postglacial woodlands (from about 13,000 years ago) is based mainly on bone fragments left by predators and found in cave deposits. Additional information can be inferred from the present bird fauna of sites where the climate is similar today, and from molecular evidence indicating if, and when, species divergence

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Medium 9782067181977

PUGLIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

PUGLIA

Continuous trading relationships with different civilisations, particularly from the Middle East, ensured that this region accumulated a substrate of different customs, cultures and traditions, resulting in a set of unique characteristics. And in its viticulture, too, Puglia was different, cultivating a huge range of grape varieties, many of which were clearly from the East, such as Aleatico, Malvasia, Uva di Troia and Moscato, but prevalently cultivars representative of the region itself, like Negroamaro, Primitivo, Notar Domenico, Susumaniello, Ottavianello, Bianco d’Alessano, Pampanuto and Impigno. Today, after years in which quantity was always considered more important than quality, things are seen differently and Puglian wine is undergoing consistent improvement.

The lovely town of Locorotondo has a DOC zone named after it

REGIONE PUGLIA ASSESSORATO TURISMO E INDUSTRIA ALBERGHIERA

The terroir

In terms of the quantity of wine Puglia produces, it is one of the top regions in Italy, but in terms of image it has to cope with the fact that for a long time its wines were considered second class, and indeed much of its must and wines has not been bottled in the region but sold to strengthen the structure and colour of wines of other regions or countries. However, efforts to upgrade Puglia’s winemaking have brought some very interesting results.

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Medium 9781574413786

Chapter 7. “back-shooting border scum and thieves”

David Johnson University Of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER

7

“back-shooting border scum and thieves”

NEWSPAPERS HERALDED IT as the Mason County War or the Mason County Disturbances. Locally it was called the Hoo Doo War, and the troubles were never confined to Mason County. It was an ethnically divisive, brutal affair that began with two factions seeking range domination in Mason and Llano counties. Best known for the violence in Mason County during 1875 and 1876, it began earlier and lasted longer than the period of Ringo’s involvement, nearly thirty years.1 One historian concerned with Ringo’s role in the fighting correctly attributes that phase of the war to the murder of Tim Williamson.2 Williamson’s death and the subsequent killing of Moses Baird mark distinct turning points in the conflict. The first brought in Scott Cooley, the latter John Ringo.

Simplistic reasons have been given for the feud’s outbreak. One ascribes the feud’s origins to the Civil War and the animosities that grew out of it. Others blame ethnic animosities between the recent immigrants from Germany and those from other parts of the United States. Concerning John Ringo, a writer incorrectly states that Ringo joined the Scott Cooley “gang which operated with the Americans when it suited their purpose.”3 Another, referring to the Cooley faction, states organized outlaw gangs took “advantage of the German-American feud.”4 Elsewhere the author states that Ringo joined the Cooley gang, “a gaggle of back-shooting border scum and thieves,” and maintains that Cooley’s gang “intruded” into a range war that “became a complex and bloody three-way struggle” with the Cooley group preying on both sides.5

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Medium 9781780491127

CHAPTER TWELVE Bion’s psychoanalytic work: from positivism and Kant to psychospirituality and beyond

Schermer, Victor L. Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER TWELVE

Bion’s psychoanalytic work: from positivism and Kant to psychospirituality and beyond

W

ilfred Bion (1897–1979) was one of the most original minds ever to grace the halls of psychoanalysis. Often, however, that originality meant “disturbing the universe” of his fellow psychoanalysts, leaving some of them confused and alienated. Much of what he said and wrote was in the form of puzzles and conundrums.

At times he wrote like a scientist, at times like a philosopher, at times like a storyteller, and at times in a stream of consciousness. Bion was an honored psychiatrist and psychoanalyst but rarely wrote or spoke like either. It was as if he were trying to learn what psychoanalysis really was about and had to strip it of its verbal trappings in order to discover its essential qualities. One of Bion’s earliest childhood memories

(1982, pp. 9, 13–14) was when he and his sister mistakenly heard the

“Our Father” as “arf arfer,” which became for them the voice of authority. When you read him, he sometimes reduces you to that child who cannot understand what the learned stranger is saying. But that is precisely where his wisdom—his hermeneutics of the “absence of memory, desire, and understanding”—is to be found. For Bion, understanding does not supply the answers to the questions he is trying to address.

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Medium 9781628871081

Victoria

Joanne Sasvari FrommerMedia ePub

6

VICTORIA

At first glance, Victoria is a pretty, quiet, well-behaved sort of place, all quaint and charming with historic houses, lush gardens, and a definite British accent. But Victoria is also so much more than that. For one thing, its setting at the rocky southern tip of Vancouver Island makes this not just a spectacularly beautiful landscape, but also one that lends itself to sailing, kayaking, whale-watching, hiking, biking, and rugged outdoor pursuits of all sorts. For another, this city has an exciting and distinctive culinary culture that goes well beyond the traditions of high tea and pub fare. Victoria, in short, is full of delicious surprises.

Victoria is not only the provincial capital, it is also one of the oldest cities in British Columbia, older than Vancouver by more than 20 years. And, unlike Vancouver, a city always eager to embrace the new and forget the past, Victoria has hung on to its lovely old buildings and its cherished traditions.

Back in the 19th century, Victoria was primarily a merchant city, supplying the crews of seafaring vessels roaming the Pacific Ocean as well as adventurers on their way to the Fraser Canyon and Klondike gold rushes. It was a very proper place, taking its role as an outpost of Queen Victoria’s empire seriously. Even so, it has always had its surprising, even scandalous side: It was, for instance, a major importer and manufacturer of opium, and back in the day had a Barbary Coast neighborhood of gambling dens and brothels that was as dangerous and decadent as any in the empire.

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Medium 9781904658337

Step One: Desire

Guiden, Alan Aeon Books ePub

STEP ONE: DESIRE

YOU WANT IT

Most early travels are ‘unintentional’. They are subconsciously motivated by desire and poof you’re out. As you’ve read, my tumble from bed followed the basic principle that drives both the ‘subconscious unintentional’ travel and the ‘conscious intentional’ travel. The principle is desire. I’m tired of the word ‘tumble’ now.

Desire is the first step, the real oomph pushing the ‘nonphysical travel’. For instance, if I ask you to go over and pick up that penny, you have a few choices. You can choose to pick up the penny; you can choose not to pick up the penny; or you can choose not to believe there is a penny. Regardless of your choice, I’ve tricked you into visualizing the penny, even if you think there is none, which is important and we’ll get to that soon. We’re not in a hurry. Well, at least I’m not. If you have things to do, stop back later. And bring me some nachos.

To continue, if you chose not to pick up the penny or chose not to believe it exists, then you’re no fun at all. But, nonphysically speaking, if you chose to pick up the penny, that becomes your ‘desire’ that triggers your ‘action’ that becomes your ‘destination’ and so you travel from your body to fulfill your desire. It’s a happy circle that brings you what you desire. Weeeeeeee.

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Medium 9781571206626

Divided Circle in a Square

Alex Anderson C&T Publishing PDF

Wall/Crib: 32˝ × 42˝

Twin: 64˝ × 84˝

Queen: 84˝ × 96˝

materials

Yardages are based on 42˝-wide fabric.

Fabric

Wall/Crib

Twin

Queen

Fabric #1

1¼ yards

3⅞ yards

5¼ yards

Fabric #2

⅜ yard

¾ yard

1 yard

Fabric #3

¾ yard

2¼ yards

3½ yards

Fabric #4

½ yard

1¼ yards

1⅝ yards

Fabric #5

½ yard

¾ yard

1 yard

Fabric #6

¾ yard

1½ yards

2¼ yards

Paper-backed fusible adhesive (based on 12˝ width)

2½ yards

9¾ yards

14 yards

Backing

36˝ × 46˝ (Use leftovers and supplement as necessary.)

68˝ × 88˝ (Use leftovers and supplement as necessary.)

88˝ × 100˝ (Use leftovers and supplement as necessary.)

Binding

Leftovers or ⅝ yard

Leftovers or 1 yard

Leftovers or 1⅛ yards

Batting

36˝ × 46˝

68˝ × 88˝

88˝ × 100˝

cutting

Fabric

Wall/Crib

Number of Pieces

Fusible Adhesive

4

Twin

Size of Pieces

Queen

Number of Pieces

8½˝ × 8½˝*

16

Size of Pieces

8½˝ × 8½˝*

24

Size of Pieces

8½˝ × 8½˝*

4

10½˝ × 10½˝

16

10½˝ × 10½˝

24

10½˝ × 10½˝

2

½˝ × 32˝ (top & bottom borders)

8

½˝ × 32˝ (top & bottom borders)

12

½˝ × 32˝

(side borders)

2

½˝ × 42˝

(side borders)

8

½˝ × 42˝

(side borders)

12

½˝ × 42˝ (top & bottom borders)

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Medium 9781609945367

Contents

Wheatley, Margaret J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub
Medium 9780253353801

11 What Condition the Postmodern Condition Is In: Collecting Culture in The Big Lebowski

Edward P Comentale Indiana University Press ePub

Allan Smithee

In the spring of 1998, moviegoers had the chance to purchase a ticket to a magic carpet ride called The Big Lebowski, a strange new Coen brothers project that may never have gotten off the ground had it not been for the assured wizardry of its creators and its colorful cast of likable actors. In the end, it sank like a bowling ball after just a few short weeks, having racked up a paltry domestic gross of $17,451,873, a largely unsympathetic reaction from critics and indifference from a mass audience that seemed interested only in keeping the good ship Titanic afloat at the local multiplex (boxofficemojo.com). At that point, Lebowski might very well have settled into its designated slot in the home video graveyard, fondly remembered, perhaps, by the same clutch of diehard Coen brothers fans who continue to defend disappointments like The Hudsucker Proxy. What happened instead was a massive revival, one that has by now easily transcended the esoteric confines of the “cult movie” and settled into a strata of public awareness somewhere just this side of the American pantheon of immortal favorites like Star Wars, The Wizard of Oz, and The Blues Brothers. Of course, the belated adoration of Lebowski is not unique in and of itself, for there are plenty of other recent comedies such as Half-Baked or Office Space that have also turned into breakout hits only after their release on home video, thanks in no small part to that peculiarly imitative ritual whereby people recite memorable dialogue or recount favorite scenes. Though such vernacular mimicry has also contributed heavily to the Lebowski phenomenon, I want to begin my discussion by suggesting that what truly distinguishes The Big Lebowski as a film—what compels us to watch it repeatedly, what makes it a phenomenon worthy of study, and what swells its continually growing ranks of admirers—is its almost unrivalled capacity to act as an occasion for the collecting of culture.

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Medium 9781523083534

19. Having Fun Every Day

Crenshaw, Dave Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

We began this book by talking about the journey through the desert. Now we’ve reached the end of this book’s journey. If you’ve been putting the principles I’ve shared into practice, odds are you’ve begun to experience greater control and productivity, all while having more fun.

At this point, it’s helpful to do a comparative assessment. Remember the Fun Scorecard you filled out in chapter 3? Time to take it again and compare your results.

You’ve got two options for retaking the quiz:

Flip back to chapter 3 and take the assessment again. Tally up your scores and compare your outcome with the first time you took the test. In which areas did you improve most? or

Take it online at PowerofHavingFun.com/quiz. This easy-to-use version does all the heavy lifting for you. It will tabulate your responses and email you the results.

I hope you’ve seen improved balance in your day and now have Personal, Family, and Work Oases all working in harmony to provide a continually refreshing experience. No matter where you are in the process, there’s always another step to take. Keep it light, be playful, and explore new ways to infuse your calendar with fun.

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Medium 9781907099786

ARCHITECTURE

Michelin Travel & Lifestyle ePub

Architecture

The palm-thatched wood dwellings Columbus saw in today’s Dominican Republic were similar to current vernacular Caribbean architecture. The Cuban bohío is a present-day example, though corrugated metal might have replaced the palm, and walls may be made of concrete block. Thatched structures known as malocas are still used in the indigenous Kogui village in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta near the Caribbean Sea.

Ancient Structures

At the thinnest point in Mexico, near the Gulf coast, what is known as Mesoamerica’s first civilization, the Olmeca (“men of rubber” in the Aztec language) established their earliest-known center. San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, where 10 of the 17 known colossal heads were found, rests on a branch of the Coatzacoalcos River that diverges then rejoins its source downstream, forming the island of Tacamichapan. Here, the architecture of the Olmeca dots a rolling, man-made mesa, not unlike the Acropolis featured in the cities of its Maya successors. It boasts more than 200 earthen mounds that have revealed elaborate stone sculptures. Despite the simplicity of flattening out plazas as one builds earth up into strategic heights, these structures have stood firm since 2500 BC. Farther south, in Mexico’s Chiapas and Yucatán, as well asin Guatemala and Belize, are stone remains of grand Maya cities. Palenque is an elegant, artistic token of Maya creativity. At Chichén Itzá’s Castillo, an architectural and astrological phenomenon sends the feathered serpent Kukulcán slithering down the north steps each year at the spring and autumn equinox.

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