JEBPS Vol 11-N1

Views: 623
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school-based professionals through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines. The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting.

List price: $15.99

Your Price: $12.79

You Save: 20%

Annual Subscriptions (2/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Introduction to Special Issue on Sustainability: Implementing Programs That Survive 100 Years

ePub

Mark D. Shriver
T. Steuart Watson

This issue of the Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools presents publications of the presentations from the Wing Institute’s Third Annual Summit on Evidence-Based Education, held on April 24, 2008. The topic of the summit was sustainability, and the authors clearly represent key figures in research and practice on the implementation of sustainable evidence-based programs. The bulk of writing on evidence-based practices and education focuses on identifying “what works” in schools and classrooms for students. Not nearly as much is written on how we sustain what works in schools and classrooms for students. Sustainability is clearly a topic in need of more attention in research and practice, and the four articles in this issue highlight key issues important to the topic of sustaining evidence-based practices.

The first article, by Detrich and colleagues, highlights the importance of treatment integrity for the sustainability of evidence-based practices. Sustainability and treatment integrity are inextricably linked, and the authors provide a comprehensive and coherent examination of the link between treatment integrity and sustainability that directly informs practice and research.

See All Chapters

Treatment Integrity: A Fundamental Unit of Sustainable Educational Programs

ePub

Ronnie Detrich
Randy Keyworth
Jack States

ABSTRACT: Educational reform has been a part of the American landscape for four decades. Research suggests that these reforms come and go quickly. Sustainability in education has proven to be elusive. In education, there are three related types of sustainability: student outcomes, interventions, and systems. In this article, we review what is known about sustainability, and we make the case that implementing interventions with high levels of treatment integrity is closely related to more sustainable student outcomes, interventions, and systems. For a comprehensive perspective on the issues, one must consider several dimensions of treatment integrity—including adherence, exposure, quality, participant responsiveness, and intervention differentiation. Each dimension has implications for sustainability. We review the literatures of treatment integrity, systems change, and sustainability to suggest a broad-spectrum approach to increasing treatment integrity and sustainability.

See All Chapters

Sustainability of Evidence-Based Programs in Education

ePub

Dean L. Fixsen
Karen A. Blase
Michelle Duda
Sandra F. Naoom
Melissa Van Dyke

ABSTRACT: As the evidence-based movement has gained momentum around the world and as more and more human service sectors have tried to make good use of science-based interventions, four significant issues have emerged within the educational context: first, how to select what to scale up and sustain; second, how to implement new education practices such that they produce the intended benefits to students (i.e., effective); third, how to scale up effective practices such that they are available to all students who could benefit from them (i.e., effective, accessible); and fourth, how to align system structures and functions to fully support scale-up efforts as part of “education as usual” (i.e., effective, accessible, sustainable). The purpose of this article is to resolve the four issues posed and to outline the best evidence and best practices related to processes that appear to be most closely associated with the sustainability of evidence-based programs and other innovations.

See All Chapters

Evidence-Based Practice in the Broader Context: How Can We Really Use Evidence to Inform Decisions?

ePub

Bruce F. Chorpita
Nicole K. Starace

ABSTRACT: In this article, we examine the evidence-based practice decision-making heuristic in the broader context of clinical decision making. We place emphasis on articulating a decision model that outlines a more complete set of decisions and considerations, beyond that of mere treatment selection, to include crisis monitoring, outcome measurement, service review, and fundamental practice integrity. We argue that the evidence base represented by the treatment outcome literature is ideal for some of these decisions (but not all), and we make recommendations for an information model—one that maps evidence and information sources to key decisions, draws on multiple objective and reliable sources of evidence, and prioritizes their use on the basis of their relevance to each decision being made.

Over the past two decades, a large number of advances have been made in the field of child and adolescent mental health, particularly in the realm of identifying and treating mental health disorders. Central to these innovations in clinical psychology has been the trend toward developing and evaluating psychosocial treatment protocols in experimental trials. Treatment testing and evaluation became greatly formalized partly as a result of the increased accountability demands of the managed health care environment in the late 1980s, particularly in light of early research that indicated that supportive evidence for psychosocial treatments was equivocal (Beutler, 1979; Eysenck, 1952; Levitt, 1957, 1963; Luborsky, Singer, & Luborsky, 1975). In the early 1990s, the American Psychological Association (APA) and its Clinical Division organized to identify psychosocial treatments with evidence for their efficacy. In 1993, the APA’s Task Force for Psychological Intervention Guidelines worked to develop a template by which treatments could be evaluated and ranked. The result was a framework that balanced considerations of efficacy (the evidence that a treatment worked in controlled trials) and effectiveness (the evidence that such a treatment would work in the real world).

See All Chapters

Schoolwide Positive Behavior Supports: Establishing a Continuum of Evidence-Based Practices

ePub

George Sugai
Robert Horner

ABSTRACT: The literature for school-based behavioral interventions spans more than 50 years and includes a full array of behavioral practices founded on principles of reinforcement and stimulus control. However, adoption and implementation of these practices are not often effective, efficient, relevant, or durable because of competing initiatives and limited resources. The purpose of this article is to describe how effective practices are incorporated into an approach termed schoolwide positive behavior supports (SWPBS), which addresses common implementation challenges. We provide a history of SWPBS, an overview of the defining features of SWPBS, a description of recent influences (i.e., responsiveness to intervention), and an example for developing a continuum of SWPBS interventions.

Educators are confronted by a seemingly never-ending barrage of new and renewed initiatives designed to address pressing educational needs and concerns, such as preventing early school leaving, closing the achievement gap, improving early literacy outcomes, creating safe and drug-free schools, improving character and socioemotional learning, enhancing math and science standings, educating students with disabilities, maximizing opportunities for talented and gifted students, and improving early childhood and preschool. Efforts to address these issues are given priority status and expected to be Schoolwide Positive Behavior Supports Continuum 63 simultaneously adopted, implemented with integrity, sustained, and extended across grade levels, schools, districts, and states.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
2370007253630
Isbn
9781475824452
File size
0 Bytes
Printing
Disabled
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
No
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata