Medium 9781475816525

IJER Vol 17-N1

Views: 1217
Ratings: (0)
The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

List price: $46.99

Your Price: $37.59

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

Editor’s Note

ePub

Charles Russo, University of Dayton

In assuming the position as the third editor in chief of the International Journal of Educational Reform, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the outgoing editor, Dr. Steve Permuth, for all of his efforts since taking over from the founding editor, Dr. Fenwick English, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. I would also like to thank the outgoing board members and welcome the new members of the editorial board, who are listed in the masthead. Insofar as we will also be setting up a board of reviewers to help in assessing publications for suitability, I invite interested readers to contact me at charles_j_russo@hotmail.com if they are willing to serve in this important capacity.

As this issue demonstrates, with articles addressing an array of educational issues in England, Israel, Turkey, and the United States, we are dedicated to providing readers with cutting-edge research and commentary on issues of educational reform that affect schooling throughout the world. We hope that readers will find these articles and future issues of IJER to be of interest.

See All Chapters

Gender Justice and the English Citizenship Curriculum: A Consideration of Post–September 11 National Imperatives and Issues of “Britishness”

ePub

Amanda Keddie

ABSTRACT: Although much contention has surrounded the introduction of the English citizenship curriculum, its political agenda clearly reflects a transformative approach to issues of justice and equity. In light of this agenda, this article supports feminist work in further problematizing the curriculum’s silence around relations of gender and citizenship. It extends this work by exploring the implications of such silence within the context of the contemporary post–September 11 climate, where discourses around security and militarism have amplified social/gender inequities worldwide while further reducing the spaces available for active social and political engagement toward the “common good.” In the U.K. context, these trends are considered in light of the recent high-profile political debate around the issue of Britishness. Here, concern is expressed about how superficial engagement with this debate may be mobilized in exclusionary ways that do little to militate against the masculinist framings of the citizenship curriculum. Conversely, critical engagement in debates around British national identity are also presented as being potentially generative in terms of their capacity to strengthen the discourse of ideal citizenship in the United Kingdom in ways that foster a more critical and gender-just approach to citizenship education.

See All Chapters

From Risk to Resilience: Promoting School–Health Partnerships for Children

ePub

Jeanita W. Richardson

ABSTRACT: Across the globe, educational and health practitioners wrestle daily with the paradoxes of risk and resilience. Though the causes of risk are generally outside the control of professionals, manifestations of disadvantage directly affect service delivery and the realizing of accountability benchmarks. This article proposes a shift in attention from risk to resilience as being empowering and proactive for students and those vested in maximizing their potential. Given that resilience has been deemed an ecological phenomenon, the ecology of human development framework posited by Uri Bronfenbrenner (1979) was applied to advance the rationale for resiliency partnerships between schools and school-based health clinics.

Poverty can create risk in every dimension of a child’s life. Impoverished youngsters around the world are more apt to be born underweight and to be malnourished, as well as susceptible to disease and environmental toxins. Furthermore, implications of these poverty markers do not disappear after birth or early childhood but rather persist into adulthood (Borman & Overman, 2004; Guo & Harris, 2000; Jenson, 2007; Richardson, 2006). Lest the focus on child poverty and the risk it creates target emerging nations alone, it is important to remember that citizen status in wealthy nations such as the United States does little to protect youngsters from economic disadvantage, particularly if they belong to racial and ethnic minorities. Whether residing in developed or emerging nations, babies and youth are subjected to a toxic risk cocktail if they are poor, by their nation’s definition. In and of itself, the term poor is relative and contextual. For purposes of this article, the word refers to family resources that are insufficient to ensure adequate housing, health, and educational opportunities undergirding optimal child development.

See All Chapters

Principal Leadership and Professional Learning Communities: What Beginning Teachers Value

ePub

Susan R. Wynn

Kathleen M. Brown

ABSTRACT: Beginning teachers in the United States continue to exit the classroom in alarming numbers, despite numerous recruitment and retention strategies. High turnover rates negatively affect instruction and, ultimately, student achievement. The purpose of this empirical inquiry of beginning-teacher retention issues is to better understand what new teachers value in a school leader within the context of professional learning communities. Twelve schools with low beginning-teacher attrition and transfer request rates were identified, and focus group interviews were conducted with four to six new teachers in each school (i.e., teachers with 1 to 3 years of experience, N = 61). Findings indicate that beginning teachers relate principal leadership, mentoring, and professional learning communities to their job satisfaction.

Teacher retention becomes an increasingly critical issue as schools address the competing demands of No Child Left Behind, state mandates, and the growing backlash to the accountability movement. The numbers are becoming well known but no less striking: 40% to 50% of beginning teachers leave the classroom within the first 5 years (Ingersoll & Smith, 2003). The issue is not recruitment—an adequate supply of teachers exists. Teaching, long viewed as a “female” career, now competes with more lucrative professions because opportunities for women have expanded (Guarino, Santibanez, & Daley, 2006). The issue is teacher attrition. Nine percent of new teachers do not complete their 1st year (Black, 2001), and 14% leave after their 1st year (Ingersoll, 2002).

See All Chapters

The Role of the Educational Leadership Program Coordinator: A Distributed Leadership Perspective

ePub

Donald G. Hackmann

Carolyn L. Wanat

ABSTRACT: This qualitative study examined the educational leadership program coordinator’s role in selected research universities, through interviews of 10 coordinators. These individuals were responsible for quasi-administrative curriculum development and outreach duties. Coordinators were committed to leading their programs despite extensive time commitments and few incentives. Two issues created barriers to distributing leadership responsibilities: faculty autonomy and program faculty size. Lacking formal authority, coordinators sometimes found it difficult to enlist the assistance of faculty colleagues. Individuals in tenure-line positions viewed their responsibilities as challenging their continued scholarly productivity, whereas those non-tenure-track positions noted that their work performance was evaluated using different criteria.

In many colleges and universities, educational leadership programs employ insufficient numbers of full-time faculty to justify status as stand-alone academic departments.1 Consequently, to promote organizational efficiency, educational leadership programs and pedagogically related disciplines, such as higher education administration and educational foundations, may be combined into one department within the college of education. Department chairs (or heads) serve as the administrative leaders of these multiple-program units and are expected “to represent all specializations within the department with equal enthusiasm” (Hecht, Higgerson, Gmelch, & Tucker, 1999, p. 25). This position is an official appointment with responsibilities delineated in institutional policy (Gmelch & Miskin, 1995): The chair is granted formal authority to lead and manage the efforts of the unit, represent the department within the university and with external constituent groups, enforce policies, and distribute institutional resources (Hecht et al., 1999; Lucas, 1994; Tucker, 1992). These responsibilities encompass not only the department in its entirety but also the individual specializations contained within the unit.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000047651
Isbn
9781475816525
File size
618 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata