Medium 9781475819083

Tep Vol 15-N1

Views: 1608
Ratings: (0)

Teacher Education and Practice, a peer-refereed journal, is dedicated to the encouragement and the dissemination of research and scholarship related to professional education. The journal is concerned, in the broadest sense, with teacher preparation, practice and policy issues related to the teaching profession, as well as being concerned with learning in the school setting. The journal also serves as a forum for the exchange of diverse ideas and points of view within these purposes. As a forum, the journal offers a public space in which to critically examine current discourse and practice as well as engage in generative dialogue. Alternative forms of inquiry and representation are invited, and authors from a variety of backgrounds and diverse perspectives are encouraged to contribute. Teacher Education & Practice is published by Rowman & Littlefield.

List price: $41.99

Your Price: $33.59

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

14 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

Overcoming the Indifference: The Political Nature of Teaching and Teacher Preparation

ePub

Patrick M. Jenlink, Editor

In order to learn to teach in a society that is increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse, prospective teachers, as well as experienced teachers and teacher educators, need opportunities to examine much of what is usually unexamined in the tightly braided relationships of language, culture, and power in schools and schooling. This kind of examination inevitably begins with our own histories as human beings and as educators; our own experiences as members of particular races, classes, and genders; and as children, parents, and teachers in the world. (Cochran-Smith, 1995, p. 500)

The nation’s schools are more racially, ethnically, and linguis tically diverse today than at any other point in history, and there are increasing tensions confronting teachers and teacher education faculty. Teaching and teacher education have become increasingly and unavoidably political activities, each made more problematic and political by the increasing complexity of cultural and linguistic diversity that is redefining what it means to learn to teach, especially in urban inner-city schools. At the same time, teaching and teacher education are subject to the debilitating effect of indifference; indifference that results from individuals who blame events on the “failure of ideas” or the “collapse of programmes” but at the same time fail to make their own voices heard and fail to lend their own moral and professional resources to promote social change and offset social injustices (Gramsci, 1977).

See All Chapters

Teaching as Moral Activity: How Public Policy Influences Urban Educational Practice

ePub

Carolyn S. Ridenour, University of Dayton

Thomas J. Lasley, II, University of Dayton

Abstract

Market strategies and competition as pathways to higher student achievement in urban settings threaten the moral purposes of teaching and schooling. In this article we argue that if policymakers continue in this direction, schooling as fundamental to the common good and a democratic society may suffer.

Every time a political or moral crisis engulfs the nation, sooner or later the ethical deficiencies of public life are related to the prevailing ethics of the community and to the education its citizens have received, or have failed to receive, in school and out. (Sidney Hook [1975] preface to an edition of Moral Principles in Education by John Dewey [1909]).

Introduction

Two emerging and conflicting value systems characterize American education. They capture the contemporary conflict that faces America’s schools: the one, a system solidly grounded on government responsibility and guarantees that are imbued with moral purpose; the other, a system driven by the invisible hand of the market that fosters personal choice and self-interest. Etzioni (1988) questioned whether human motivation operates in economic terms, maximizing benefits and reducing costs, or rather, do humans aspire toward the highest good? To Wolfe (2001), we are not able to recognize such conflict because America finds itself in an age of moral freedom, where individual and subjective interpretations of right and wrong replace the possibility of objective debate. The policy issues are not new in public education, but the proposed solutions challenge essential assumptions about what practices best serve the public good.

See All Chapters

Commitment, Community, and Passion: Dimensions of a Care-centered Approach to Teacher Education

ePub

Lisa S. Goldstein, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Abstract

In order to prepare teachers who will be able to draw upon caring to build a strong foundation for their professional practices we must design teacher education programs specifically focused toward those ends. In this article I build on Nel Noddings’s influential work on caring encounters to develop a care-centered approach to teacher education. This model emphasizes the important contributions to be made to the process of preparing caring teachers by (1) enhanced interpersonal commitment; (2) membership in a community of learners; and (3) passion for the creative, intellectual aspects of teaching. The central features of the model—commitment, community’, and passion—are also considered in relation to practical challenges in teacher education.

If we accept the commonly-held belief that caring is a fundamen tal, essential pat of teaching, then teacher education programs should be a primary site for the development and sustenance of care-centered pedagogical beliefs and practices (Goodlad, Soder & Sirotnik 1990; Rogers & Webb 1991). It has been argued, however, that teacher education is not presently meeting those expectations (Arnstine, 1990; Greene, 1990; Thayer-Bacon & Bacon, 1996a; 1996b). For example, Barbara Arnstine (1990) offers a scathing critique of existing teacher education practices, assetting that the fundamental values, assumptions, and goals of teacher education programs make it virtually impossible to develop caring teachers within them. She writes:

See All Chapters

Preparing to Teach in Urban Schools: Advice from Urban Teachers

ePub

Deborah Diffily, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University

Helen Perkins, Ed.D., Southern Methodist University

Abstract

As the percentage of teachers who are middle-class Caucasian women continues to rise, it is important that teachers are prepared to teach in racially, ethnically, and culturally-diverse urban schools. The original goal of this investigation was to listen to the voices of effective urban teachers as part of improving a teacher education program. During teacher interviews, the participants themselves expanded the focus of the study beyond preservice preparation into the first year of teaching in an urban school.

Introduction

Over the past thirty years, the number of minority teachers has been slowly decreasing, while the number of minority children - and children who live at or below the poverty line - continues to increase. Experts predict that the percentage of minority teachers will continue to decrease. By 2010, minority teachers will represent less than 5 percent of America’s educators. At the same time, authorities predict that more than 40 percent of American students will be minorities (Chase, 1988).

See All Chapters

School/University Partnerships: An Agenda That Works

ePub

Viola E. Florez, University of New Mexico

Abstract

The issue of teacher quality is the key to the larger debate about public schools and educational reform in the United States. This articlefocuses on the importance of high quality teachersfor urban settings and the best practices for high quality school/university partnerships. A thirt’-year histoiy continues to promote the work of the University of New Mexico and Albuquerque Public Schools (UNM/APS) Partnership programs. These programs support the collaboration and partnering efforts to be strong components of the teacher preparation programs at the University level. They have provided teacher candidates with the appropriate experiences and training to become high quality> teachers for urban and rural classroom settings. The type of experiences providedfor thesefitture teachers prepares them for the challenges that face the schools of today. These experiences begin at the recruiting, preparation, induction, and advanced professional development levels. There is a continued effort to meet the challenges facing society today, especially concerns with the low levels of academic achievement of students in general.

See All Chapters

Power through Partnership: The Urban Network for the Improvement of Teacher Education (UNITE)

ePub

Moreen Travis Carvan, Urban Network to Improve Teacher Education, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Amanda Nolen, The Holmes Partnership, Baylor University

Robert Yinger, The Holmes Partnership, Baylor University

Abstract

The Urban Network for the Improvement of Teacher Education (UNITE) was created to address the notion that teachers need to be specifically prepared to teach in urban settings based upon the understanding that teaching and learning in urban schools is qualitatively different than that experienced in other contexts. This network emergedfrom the work of The Holmes Partnership carrying forth the concept of partnership as a vehicle for education reform. UNITE identified four areas where transformation was needed: a) the culture of colleges, b) the quality of instruction, c) the programs for preparing teachers for urban contexts, and d) working relationships with urban elementaiy andsecondaiy schools (Howey, 1992). This article documents the evolution of this national network as a strategy to address the complex issues in urban education.

See All Chapters

The Challenges of Urban Education: A Conversation with Gerardo Gonzalez, University Dean of the School of Education at Indiana University

ePub

Gerardo Gonzalez, Indiana University

Patrick M. Jenlink, Stephen F. Austin State University

Abstract

This article presents a conversation between Gerardo Gonzalez, Dean of the School of Education at Indiana University, and Patrick Jenlink, Editor for Teacher Education and Practice. Indiana University is a large Research Extensive institution, with a traditional teacher preparation program on the Flagship campus in Bloomington in concert with a Professional Development School (PDS) based teacher preparation program on its Indianapolis campus. Dean Gonzalez shares his perspectives on the challenges of urban education and teacher preparation, as well as his vision of a framework for changes in teacher preparation over the next five years.

Jenlink: First, let me thank you forjoining me in this conversation. Perhaps I could begin by asking you to describe your role in the School of Education at Indiana University, in particular teacher preparation, in order to help set a context for our conversation.

See All Chapters

Leading (Negotiating) Teacher Education in a Rapidly Growing Urban Setting

ePub

Gene E. Hall, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Linda Qiiinn, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Martha Young, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Abstract

The College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas has played a central role in addressing teachereducation in an urban setting. Pressure to prepare hundreds of new teachers has inspired the creation of an array of innovative programs. In meeting the challenges of change we have developed greater understanding of the importance of effective leadership. Examples of initiatives and issues are described along with five themes that are key to leadership effectiveness.

When one thinks about urban areas in America, images of Detroit, Chicago, New York and Los Angeles come to mind. Each city’s name conjures up images of crowded streets, high and low socioeconomic areas juxtaposed in high-rise complexes and sprawling suburbs, and schools filled with many children from minority ethnic groups, who often are poor and commonly speaking a language other than English at home. These common characteristics serve to identify the American urban scene. In addition to the many factors that urban areas have in common, they also have unique differences. For example, places like Newark and Philadelphia are old inner cities with collapsing infrastructures and decreasing populations, while places like Phoenix and Atlanta are faced with creating new infrastructures to support rapid population growth

See All Chapters

Preparing Teachers for Urban Schools in California: A Conversation with Judith Ramirez, and L.Y. “Mickey” Hollis, College of Human Development and Community Service, California State University, Fullerton

ePub

Judith Ramirez, California State University, Fullerton L. Y. “Mickey” Hollis, California State University, Fullerton

Patrick M. Jenlink, Stephen F. Austin State University

Abstract

Teacherpreparation in California, like many states with large urban centers, is undergoing changes in response to public concerns and legislative actions focused on improving the quality of teachers entering the classroom. In this article, Judith Ramirez, Dean of the College of Human Development and Community Service and L. Y. “Mickey” Hollis, Associate Dean and Director of the School of Education, both at California State University, Fullerton, take part in a conversation with Patrick Jen/ink, Editorfor Teacher Education and Practice, which focuses on preparing teachers for the urban school. Ramirez and Hollis help to illuminate the complexity of teacher preparation in light of recent legislation and the phasing-in of new standards designed to change teacher preparation programmatically. The challenges of recent actions in California, like Proposition 227, combined with the reality of high minority population schools and large non-English speaking populations, are examined in relation to preparing teachers for the urban school setting.

See All Chapters

Facing the Urban Challenge in Teacher Education: The Penn State Experience

ePub

David H. Monk, The Penn State University

Abstract

The teacher education program at Penn State is based on the University Park campus which is geographically distant/mm urban areas in the Commonwealth. The author describes the University’s efforts to overcome the geographic and related barriers so that the effort to prepare teachers at Penn State is more programmatically connected to the needs of urban schooling systems. Seven initiatives are described and progress to date as well as future plans are reported.

Introduction

Penn State is a large multi-campus land grant university that pursues an ambitious mission built around efforts to integrate programs in the areas of teaching, research, and outreach. The University has a longstanding interest in the preparation of teachers, and the College of Education on the University Park campus is joined by three other University Park Colleges (Agricultural Sci-ences, Arts and Architecture, and Health and Human Development) to deliver teacher education programs.

See All Chapters

Dewey, Vygotsky and Teacher Preparation for Urban Schools

ePub

Phyllis Metcalf-Turner, University of Louisville

Douglas J. Simpson, Texas Tech University

Abstract

The authors address the question “What is it that teacher educators need to deeply understand and do if we are to be more effective in preparing new teachers for urban schools?” through the lenses provided by John Dewey, Lev Vygotsky, and multicultural theorists. They begin with the claim thatfiiture teachers need to be prepared by teacher educators who understandphilosophical and theoretical perspectives that are sufficiently comprehensive and powerful to interpret the complexities of teaching urban students, relevant research, and pertinent experience. Their interpretation and application of these theoretical perspectives offer insight into the preparation of future teacher educators and aspiring classroom teachers.

Introduction

One of the ongoing challenges in teacher education is exam ining what it means to be a teacher in most American urban public schools and developing programs that improve teachers’ expertise and effectiveness in providing differential and appropriate instruction to an increasingly diverse student population. Urban education, “ghetto schooling,” (Anyon, 1997) education for the “at-risk,” and schooling forthe “disadvantaged” are all euphemisms frequently used throughout education research concerning how to teach students of diverse ethnic, racial, linguistic, and low socioeconomic backgrounds (Spillane & Thompson, 1997). More recently, the use of different pedagogical teriinology—like “culturally responsive teaching,” “culturally relevant teaching,” and “teaching for social justice”—is in direct reference to this population of students (Cochran-Smith, 2000; Gay, 2000; Ladson-Billings, 1995). Despite the variance in descriptors, the troubling questions are the same: What type of an investment should be made in the preparation of new teachers for urban schools? What philosophical beliefs, theoretical underpinnings, and “funds of knowledge” should be used to guide programmatic development, course offerings, and the design of field-based learning activities? These questions are especially critical in light of the fact that tomorrow’s teachers are most likely to be young, EuropeanAmeiican, monolingual, middle class females whose own educational development has provided little to no exposure to many of the variables embedded in the social context and lives ofurban school children (Ladson-Billings, 2000; Nieto, 2000). Research literature indicates that in the 1990s urban teachers were less likely than in previous decades to be working with European Ameiican students and more likely to be teaching predominately African American and/or Hispanic students and newly amved immigrants (National Center for Educational Statistics, 1998, online document; Weiner, 2000). The twenty-first century, at least the foreseeable portions of it, promises the same kind of student and teacher populations. Thus, our basic question is a critical one: What is it that teacher educators need to deeply understand and do if we are to be more effective in preparing new teachers for urban schools?

See All Chapters

Drops in the Bucket: One Institution’s Efforts In Urban Education

ePub

Jerry Robbins, Eastern Michigan University

Abstract

Eastern Michigan University, especially through its College of Education, is deeply committed to providing well-prepared education professionals, quality services, and relevant scholarship as part of its metropolitan mission. Various special projects and activities, curriculum andfield experiences, and scholarly activities that are used by EMU to address the needs of the urban environment are described.

Eastern Michigan University (EMU) is located in Ypsilanti. Most of our students live within an hour’s drive and this rough circle defines much of our functional service area as well. If I leave my office in the EMU College ofEducation (COE) and drive south for an hour, I have passed through small towns and mral areas and am in Toledo, Ohio. If I drive west for an hour, I have passed through Ann Arbor-easily one of the cultural centers of not only Michigan but of the Mid-West-and am in relatively prosperous, mral countryside. If I go north for an hour, I have passed through a county that is experiencing very rapid, generally upscale population growth and am almost to Flint, a city whose fortunes tend to wax and wane with the automobile industry. If I go northeast, I am in the highly affluent suburbs of Detroit. If I go east, in an hour I can be in line to cross the bridge into Canada-or at almost any point in the city of Detroit-passing the booming Detroit Metro aiiport, older suburbs, and industrialized and economically depressed areas along the way.

See All Chapters

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for Urban Educators: An Annotated Bibliography

ePub

Johnetta Hudson, University of North Texas

Charisse Cowan, University of North Texas

Abstract

The authors introduce the reader to a collection of articles, books, ERIC documents, web sites and video tapes as resources as a resource base for educators and teacher educators that are responsible for urban schools and the teachers who work in these schools. Presented in annotatedfonn, the authors provide a synthesis of materials germane to teaching and teacher preparation in urban cities and population centers where being culturally responsive is a crucial part of pedagogy and practice.

Introduction

The works presented and annotated below serve as a resource for teacher educators, education students and in-service teach ers who are committed to expanding their knowledge base, skills and instructional strategies so as to better service the needs of an ever increasing diverse student population.

The articles, books, ERIC documents, web sites and videotapes presented offer numerous strategies for implementing culturally responsive pedagogy, lesson plans, and resource materials. Several works examine some of the major issues being debated among educators, such as celebrating diversity versus preparing students for mainstream society. Other works are research studies that have explored topics such as prospective teachers’ attitudes toward urban schools and why teachers are not using effective multicultural education practices.

See All Chapters

Contributors

ePub

Moreen Travis Carvan is currently the Associate Director for the Urban Network for the Improvement of Teacher Education. She is also a visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Education, Department of Curriculum and Instmction at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

Charisse Cowan is a Ph.D. candidate in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of North Texas. A Diversity Scholar Lecturer in the Department of Teacher Education and Administration, her research is in the area of instructional models and policy related to the academic achievement of students in high-risk environments. She is a teacher educator specializing in effective pedagogy for diverse student populations with emphasis on the academic achievement of students in poverty and those belonging to underrepresented groups.

Deborah Diffily is an Assistant Professor of Education in the Center for Teacher Education at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Diffily’s primary research interests include literacy and scientific development of young children, implementing project-based learning, and working with families. She is interested in developing courses and field-based experiences that better prepare students to become effective teachers in urban settings.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000047708
Isbn
9781475819083
File size
484 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata