Medium 9780874256093

The Manager's Pocket Guide to Career Skills for the New Economy

Views: 347
Ratings: (0)

This pocket guide provides all employees a game plan for succeeding in the modern, fast changing economy. Teaches how to learn and accumulate marketable skills that will transfer to different jobs and different companies. The underlying assumption of Career Skills for the New Economy is that, in the new economy, individuals will have to be extremely good at fending for themselves if they are to survive and succeed. The most successful people will position themselves as free agents and sell their skills and abilities on the open market. Even those who work for the same employer for years on end will have to take responsibility for their own success and security.

List price: $14.95

Your Price: $11.96

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
 

10 Slices

Format Buy Remix

WELCOME TO THE WORKPLACE OF THE FUTURE

PDF

CAREER S KILLS FOR THE N EW ECONOMY

As businesses reinvented work processes, they also eliminated layers of management, making way for today’s fluid cross-trained teams, which tackle whatever work needs to be done whenever it needs to be done. Downsizing and restructuring made organizations leaner and more elastic by expanding their repertoire of staffing options; instead of having to rely solely on full-time, long-term employees, companies could also draw on temps, independent contractors, part-timers, and the like, and so staff up or down on an as-needed basis. That’s why the fastest growing forms of work in the last ten years have been temporary work, leased work, outsourced work, consulting, and small to midsize business entrepreneurship (fueled largely by the booms in temping, leasing, outsourcing, and consulting).

Each of these forms of work lends flexibility to employment relationships.

In a relatively brief span of time, then, organizational response to economic change has virtually freed work from the confines of the old-fashioned job. It is no longer the norm for employees to go to work every day at the same company in the same building during the same hours to do the same tasks in the same position with the same responsibility in the same chain of command.

 

HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN SUCCESS

PDF

CAREER S KILLS FOR THE N EW ECONOMY

STRATEGY 1

LEARN STRATEGICALLY AND VORACIOUSLY

Right now, for nearly any subject, more information is produced in a single day than most of us could master in an entire lifetime. And the knowledge we do have becomes obsolete more rapidly than ever before. Meanwhile, work in the new economy is increasingly information- and knowledge-based, and so to succeed in that economy, a person must wield up-to-date marketable skills and knowledge.

There are two crucial dimensions to strategic learning in the new economy:

1. Building a wide repertoire of transferable skills

2. Becoming a knowledge-worker

1. Building Transferable Skills

Transferable skills are defined as skills that (a) are unlikely to become obsolete anytime soon, and (b) increase your value, no matter where you go or what you do. For example, skill in using a particular software package is not necessarily transferable because software becomes obsolete quickly and not all organizations rely on the same software. However, the ability to get up to speed easily on most new software packages (to learn them

 

THE ART OF MANAGING YOURSELF

PDF

C AREER S KILLS FOR THE NEW ECONOMY

2. Examine Your Priorities

What matters the most to you? The answer to this question is highly important because if your priorities are clear and you stay in touch with them, many decisions that would otherwise be tough will be quite easy for you.

For example, let’s suppose your family means the most to you. What happens when you must choose between working all weekend and attending your child’s birthday party? If your priorities are clear, that’s a no-brainer. It’s also a no-brainer if missing work would seriously threaten your job and thus your ability to support your family.

But what if missing work would be more a threat to your popularity at work than to your job? In such a case, you would have to be honest with yourself and get in touch with your priorities. What’s more important to you—being popular at work or being there for your children?

Again, a no-brainer.

Of course, you might try to figure out a way to get your work done and attend the party. What if you got up at

 

THE CRITICAL THINKING SQUAD

PDF

 

BECOME AN EXPERT IN HUMAN RELATIONS

PDF

5. BECOME AN EXPERT IN HUMAN RELATIONS

.

person is saying. When it’s your turn to speak, first ask open-ended questions such as “What do you mean?” or

“What would be a good example of that?” Listen carefully to the answers. Then, to ensure you understand what the person has said, ask specific, clarifying questions such as “Do you mean [clearly say what you think the person means]?” or “Are you saying [clearly say what you think the other person is saying]?” When you feel confident you understand, don’t change the subject; instead, respond directly to what has been said.

4

EMPATHIZE WITH PEOPLE

Try to imagine yourself in the other person’s position.

Ask yourself what thoughts and feelings you might have if you were in that position. Then behave in a way and say the kinds of things that you would appreciate under the same circumstances.

5

EXHIBIT RESPECT AND KINDNESS

Take courtesy the extra mile. If you think the person is pressed for time, be brief. If you think something might be wrong, ask if there is anything you can do to help (but don’t be pushy). Never share observations that might be insulting, and never hesitate to share a compliment.

 

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS WITH VALUABLE DECISION-MAKERS

PDF

6. B UILD R ELATIONSHIPS WITH V ALUABLE DECISION-M AKERS

.

STEP 1

CLARIFY EXACTLY WHAT YOU HAVE TO

OFFER

Even if your main concern is to get something out of the relationship, focus on what you bring to the table. This is possible, no matter what you might want or need. For instance, let’s say you want lessons from someone. Instead of thinking “I want someone to teach me,” reframe the situation: “I want to offer myself as a student.” If you wish to teach, don’t ask for students; rather, offer your skills and knowledge. Instead of asking to be introduced, offer someone the chance to introduce you. Instead of asking people to meet with each other, offer to bring people together. And so on.

STEP 2

MAKE SURE THE DECISION-MAKER IS

“RIGHT” FOR THE TRANSACTION

Every person is a decision-maker by virtue of free will.

But different people have decision-making authority in different spheres. You need to identify the decisionmakers who have the authority to act on what you are offering, who can engage in the transaction you propose.

 

LEARN TO MANAGE YOUR BOSS

PDF

C AREER S KILLS FOR THE NEW ECONOMY

creative freedom, and flexibility they want to provide for you.

The best managers are leaders, role models, teachers, coaches, and mentors—people who go to bat for anyone who works hard for them. You will never forget them, and they will never forget you. In fact, they may become some of the best friends you will ever have.

Bad managers, however, are a whole different story.

No matter how miserable they may be, you cannot let them stand in your way. Remember, your boss is only your boss for today—tomorrow, he or she could be your customer, your supplier, teammate, subordinate, friend, adversary, teacher, student, spouse, in-law, or somebody you never see again. The hierarchy of your relationship is temporary. If your manager is getting in your way, you must take control of the situation.

To help your manager help you succeed, follow these six guidelines:

1. Help your manager delegate effectively.

2. Get the feedback you need.

3. Set specific learning objectives, and get your manager’s support.

 

GET GOOD AT MANAGING OTHERS

PDF

8. GET G OOD AT MANAGING OTHERS

.

amounts and different types of feedback, and these factors are likely to vary over time. In order to “tune in” to each person’s unique frequency, think about each person you are managing and determine what kind of feedback he or she needs—how much, when, and in what form. Then try to provide the kind of feedback that works best for that person.

Accurate

The feedback you provide must be correct, balanced, and appropriate. Stop and check your facts before giving feedback. Overall, try to strike a good balance between praise and criticism. Most important, always choose your words carefully. You may even want to rehearse the feedback.

Specific

Feedback is not specific enough unless it points to concrete action steps. Every instance of feedback is also an opportunity to delegate—to assign concrete goals with specific deadlines and clear guidelines and parameters

(see Guideline 1 above).

Timely

Always give feedback in a timely manner. The sooner the feedback follows the performance in question, the more impact the feedback will have. Giving immediate

 

ADOPT A TOTAL CUSTOMER SERVICE MINDSET

PDF

C AREER S KILLS FOR THE NEW ECONOMY

1. Know in advance your own desired terms (what you will ask for) and your own bottom line (the least favorable terms you are willing to accept).

2. Make sure you are talking to the person with the power to make the decision involved or at least influence the decision; otherwise you will be wasting your time.

3. Move the conversation to specific terms—time, place, and money.

4. State your desired terms, and then shut up. Stop talking. Be patient. Sit through the uncomfortable silence. Somebody has to talk first. The person who does is very likely to try to move toward the other person’s negotiating position.

So wait for your customer to say something.

That something may be “Yes,” or “No way,” or

“Maybe.” You won’t know which unless you listen carefully.

5. Stop and think about your response. If the customer has said, “Yes,” then you just closed the deal. If customer has said, “Maybe,” or has equivocated in any way, simply repeat your desired terms and shut up again. Keep doing this until you get to “Yes” or “No way.” If the decision is “No way,” go straight to the next step.

 

SUCCESS HAPPENS ONE MOMENT AT A TIME

PDF

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000045796
Isbn
9781599967493
File size
577 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata