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Frontiers in Education: Computer Science and Computer Engineering: The 2013 WorldComp International Conference Proceedings

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Session - Accreditation + Assessment Strategies + Academic Reviews

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Assessing Student Learning in Computer Science – A Case Study

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

3

Assessing Student Learning in

Computer Science – A Case Study

K.B. Lakshmanan†, Sandeep R. Mitra†, and T.M. Rao†

Department of Computer Science

The College at Brockport, State University of New York

Brockport, NY 14420, USA

Abstract – Student learning outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. In order to assess the extent to which an outcome is met, it is necessary to define an outcome in terms of measurable performance indicators. Rubrics allow collection of relevant data and their consistent interpretation. Using just one outcome as an example, this paper presents the approach used by the

College at Brockport, State University of New York to define appropriate performance indicators, construct a curriculum map, develop holistic rubrics, collect data, evaluate, and use the findings for continuous program improvement.

Keywords: ABET, accreditation, assessment, outcomes, performance indicators, rubrics

 

Using A Learning Management System to Facilitate Program Accreditation

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

Using A Learning Management System to Facilitate

Program Accreditation

Harry N. Keeling, Ph.D.

Howard University

Department of Systems and Computer Science

College of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences

2300 6th Street NW, Washington, DC 20059

(202) 806-4830

ABSTRACT

In this paper we introduce AssessTrack, a web-based learning management system (LMS) that Assesses and

Tracks key elements of engineering education. It is designed to (1) facilitate student learning, (2) ease the rigors of course management and (3) address the daunting task of collecting assessment data for engineering program accreditation. AssessTrack provides an individualized, tailored study guide generated by AssessTrack’s intelligent tutor. For educators, the system provides a paperless environment where they can easily post all the key components of the instructional process (course material, lectures, assessments, tutorials, surveys and grades).

AssessTrack gives engineering program administrators and accreditation agencies (in our case, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, ABET) the ability to track the attainment of program objectives and course educational outcomes, both formatively and summatively.

 

A Bottom-Up Outcome-Based Learning Assessment Process for Accrediting Computing Programs

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

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A Bottom-Up Outcome-Based Learning Assessment

Process for Accrediting Computing Programs

Haidar M. Harmanani

Department of Computer Science and Mathematics

Lebanese American University

Byblos, 1401 2010, Lebanon

Abstract—The push for a culture of evidence that guides improvement in higher-education has made outcome-based assessment a necessity. Furthermore, the recent move by

ABET’s CAC into more rigorous assessment has caused anxiety among faculty and administrators. Assessment leaders face various challenges including process design and implementation, faculty buy-in, and resources availability.

This paper presents a bottom-up outcome-based assessment approach that facilitates faculty participation while simplifying the assessment and reporting processes. The proposed approach has been implemented and used for the successful accreditation of a computer science program, and can be easily adapted to any higher education program.

Keywords: Program Outcome Assessment, ABET Accreditation

 

Three First-Time Computer Engineering Program Accreditation Experiences

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

23

THREE FIRST-TIME COMPUTER ENGINEERING PROGRAM

ACCREDITATION EXPERIENCES

William A. Stapleton

Ingram School of Engineering, Texas State University – San Marcos

601 University Drive, 2240 RFM, San Marcos, TX 78666 USA wstapleton@txstate.edu, Voice: (512) 245-8746, FAX: (512) 245-7771

The 2013 International Conference on Frontiers in Education: Computer Science and Computer Engineering

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the successful first-time accreditation experiences under the ABET EC2000 criteria with three Computer Engineering programs at

The University of South Alabama in 1998, The University of Alabama in 2002, and Texas State University-San

Marcos in 2012. The author was directly involved with each of these successful accreditation efforts and offers observations on the common elements underpinning their success.

All three of the Computer Engineering programs described herein were structured from their inception with the consideration of the ABET criteria specific to

 

Improving Academic Quality in a Computer Science Graduate Program

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

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Improving Academic Quality in a Computer

Science Graduate Program

Meline Kevorkian#1, Gregory Simco#2

#

#

Office of Academic Affairs, Nova Southeastern University

3301 College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314, USA melinek@nova.edu

Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences, Nova Southeastern University

3301 College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314, USA greg@nova.edu

The 2013 World Congress in Computer Science,

Computer Engineering, and Applied Computing

Abstract—Building quality programs based on academic metrics are considered an effective means for recruitment and retention in higher education, especially in the areas of science, technology, and math. The aim of this paper is to share the academic review process of Nova Southeastern

University and the results of the collegial, peer, and external review to continually build the quality of the

Master of Science in Computer Science.

Keywords: Computer Science, Academic Review, and

 

Student Assessment of Student Work

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

Student Assessment of Student Work

Donald R. Schwartz

Department of Computer Science

School of Computer Science and Mathematics

Millsaps College

Marist College

Jackson, MS USA

Poughkeepsie, NY USA

Abstract - One of our goals is to graduate students who possess the skill sets necessary for success in both the workforce and in their graduate studies. Assessment plays a significant rolet in this – students who have learned how to assess not only the work of others, but their own work, have an advantage over those who must acquire this skill after graduation. This paper describes some of the ways we have incorporated assessment skills throughout our curriculum. It also includes samples of actual student self-assessment and student peer-assessment exercises.

Keywords: Assessment of Student Work, Student SelfAssessment, Collaborative Learning, Factors that lead to success in CS and CE

1

Introduction and Philosophy

There are a wide variety of studies that describe the benefits of student self-assessment.[1][2]

 

Using a Dashboard as a Visualization Tool for Assessment Data

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

Using a Dashboard as a

Visualization Tool for Assessment Data

Courtney Lamar1, Velma Latson1, Quincy Brown1, Lethia Jackson1, and Gail Fink2

1

Department of Computer Science, Bowie State University, Bowie, MD, USA

2

Office of Planning, Analysis and Accountability, Bowie State University, Bowie, MD, USA

Abstract – In this paper we describe the use of an instructional maturity model to develop a continuous improvement process for the Computer Science (COSC) and

Computer Technology (CTEC) programs of the Computer

Science Department of Bowie State University. This process was also used to meet ABET (Accreditation Board for

Engineering and Technology) accreditation standards. The process involves the participation of stakeholders including faculty, students, alumni, employers, and external advisory board members. Data collected during the process is represented visually in a dashboard that identifies strengths and weaknesses of the programs. Objective, data-driven decisions are made at both the course and program levels to improve the effectiveness of the Department’s curricula.

 

A Heuristic Approach for Student-Outcomes Assessment Using Bloom’s Taxonomy

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

A Heuristic Approach for Student-Outcomes

Assessment Using Bloom’s Taxonomy

Iraj Danesh

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

College of Science, Mathematics and Technology

Alabama State University, Montgomery, Alabama, USA

Abstract - Assessment techniques constitute parts of program accreditation processes and are of enduring interest to all educators, including computer science educators. A repeating Heuristic Student-OutcomeLevel Cycle (SOL- Cycle) that includes student outcome assessment according to Bloom’s

Taxonomy, coupled with an enriching Course-Level cycle is introduced. Graphical analysis of selected topics as well as excerpts of student outcomes mapped with their performance indicators and related courses are discussed.

Keywords: Assessment, ABET, indicators, rubric, outcomes, excerpt, taxonomy

General Terms: Student outcomes, performance indicators, technology in assessment, mapping and alignment

1.

Introduction

The ABET [1] and other accrediting agencies such as SACS, NCACS, WASC grant status of public recognition to the program that meets the agency’s standards, criteria, and requirements.

 

A General Course-Level Assessment Cycle for Computing Courses

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

A General Course-Level Assessment Cycle for

Computing Courses

Iraj Danesh

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

College of Science, Mathematics and Technology

Alabama State University, Montgomery, Alabama, USA

Abstract - Assessment techniques are of enduring interest to all educators, including computer science educators. They constitute parts of program accreditation processes.

Course assessment is a core program assessment subset that is addressed comprehensively in this paper. A repeating course-level cycle is presented. For each component of the cycle, a survey of related methodologies and strategies including means and tools of assessments is introduced. Selection of processes that best fits the course under assessment including the use of multisource/multi-method to maximize validity, reliability, and reduce bias of any approach is discussed.

Keywords: Assessment, ABET, stakeholders, indicators, rubrics, caveats

General Terms: Multi-mean and multi-tool assessment, student outcomes, item analysis, success targets

 

Session - Tools and Systems + Studies Including, Plagiarism, Attendance Tracking, Class Management Systems, Research Methods, Capstone Projects, and Others

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Online detection of source-code plagiarism in undergraduate programming courses

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

57

Online detection of source-code plagiarism in undergraduate programming courses

D. Pawelczak

Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

University of Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw M), Neubiberg, Germany

Abstract - Plagiarism in programming courses has increased in recent years. Therefore, courses need to be adapted in concept and organization. A relentless pursuit of plagiarizing or the ineffective attempt to completely suppress all communication in the classroom are certainly as inadequate approaches as the installation of an offline plagiarism detection tool without a proper feedback mechanism for the students.

Ideally, teamwork is allowed, but each student submits her/ his own solution. A “real-time” plagiarism detection tool gives immediate feedback on a submitted solution during class time.

Based on typical indicators, which course instructors use to manually detect plagiarism, a new software system is developed. This system allows submissions of programs, which are automatically tested for proper functionality and checked against other submissions. An evaluation of the system with data sets from an undergraduate C-programming course reveals a high rate of plagiarisms while false detection

 

Some useful components of an effective class management system

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

Some useful components of an effective class management system

Luby Liao

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

University of San Diego

San Diego, CA 92110 liao@sandiego.edu

Abstract—This paper describes a simple and effective class management system I developed over the years using the Google family of applications, and use in all my classes. The components of the system help gather students’ information in constant time, create class mailing lists for discussions and announcements, organize students’ work in a class portfolio that persists after class, enable collaboration among professor and teaching assistants in keeping students’ performance record, provide students timely feedback of their course work, and allow them to provide feedback anonymously. While simple, it serves all my classes well, and offers functionalities such as grade reporting that complex systems such as Blackboard do not. Some components, such as the class portfolio and the mailing list can continue to be useful after semester ends.

 

Portal of Research Methods and Methodologies for Research Projects and Degree Projects

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

67

Portal of Research Methods and Methodologies for

Research Projects and Degree Projects

Anne Håkansson

Department of Software and Computer Systems,

The Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Kista, Sweden

Abstract Research methods and methodologies are extremely important when conducting research and degree projects. The use and application of the methods and methodologies are considered to be “necessarily vicious” and, unfortunately, often applied after the research has been conducted. The need for applying methods before the actually research and the reasons for doing so are often stressed in the literature and courses for research and scientific writing. This includes the aspects of selecting, understanding and applying research methods for a selected project. Unfortunately, it is difficult to choose well-suited methods and too often the selected methods and methodologies do not match each other. Instead, methods are applied without knowing about the consequences the applied method have both on the other chosen methods and on the results of the work or research. This paper provides a portal of research methods and methodologies to help the students to choose and apply the most suitable methods by illustrating which methods belong together and the distinctions between the different methods.

 

Investigating Female Students’ Attitude towards Cheating and Plagiarism: A Study in King Saud University

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

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Attendance Tracking

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

79

Attendance Tracking

1

D. Deugo1

The School of Computer Science, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Abstract - We believe that a student’s attendance in their university courses is important for the successful completion of their courses and that student attendance is a marker one can use to identify students in need. The problem this paper addresses is how to track student attendance in university courses in a fast and efficient manner, given class sizes can be as small as 10 students and as large as 300. Our approach uses easily found, inexpensive hardware and makes use of students’ smartphones to help with the attendance tracking process. Our applications for the server and client portions of our system use open source software to minimize development and maintenance costs and do not require end users or system administrators to perform any installation.

Keywords: Attendance, Tracking, Smartphone, Web

1

Introduction

The Science Student Success Centre (SSSC) at Carleton

 

Breaking the Programming Obstacles using an Automatic Tool.

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

Breaking the Programming Obstacles using an

Automatic Tool.

Luis H. González Guerra and Armandina J. Leal Flores

Computer Science Department, Tecnológico de Monterrey

Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico

Abstract

There are some programming obstacles that the students have to deal when they are trying to solve a problem using a programming language, like the inexperience of the language, the unknoledge of some algorithms, and some cases the amateurishness of how to test a solution. The technological tools for developing programs and computer systems heavily explore the syntax and semantics of a program but do not provide support to determine its correctness and this is where students may failed by not exploring the correct scenarios and test cases. In this paper, we present the use of automatic evaluation tools as a way to help to remove these obstacles and improve learning experience, coding and testing skills in students.

Keywords: authomatic evaluation, programming skills, problem solving.

 

International Computer Science Capstone Project Exchange Program: A Case Study Report

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Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'13 |

International Computer Science Capstone Project Exchange Program: A Case Study Report

Dean Knudson

Computer Science Department, North Dakota State University

Fargo, North Dakota, United States

Abstract - Real-world capstone projects that are done for regional industry are very important for computer science students. However, once the students leave for jobs in industry they often find themselves working on internationally distributed teams. Thus, it would be of great benefit for students to have the opportunity to work remotely on a project that is being done for a company in another country and mentored by employees of that company. For the past two years North Dakota State University (NDSU) has included capstone projects from Germany and Sweden in its computer science program. A new unique project exchange pooling concept has been used to set up the projects, which has worked very well. This paper will describe the exchange pool methodology and discuss in some detail the projects that were completed. Lessons learned as well as potential improvements and long term goals will also be described.

 

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