The Birth of Experience

Views: 190
Ratings: (0)

The birth of experience goes on all life long. Giving birth to oneself involves many processes. The first chapter of this book expands on Eigen's final talk on "Psychoanalysis and Kabbalah" for the New York University Postdoctoral Contemplative Studies Project, and focuses in particular on an intertwining of beauty and destruction. Beauty is the heart of the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, intricately linked both to other capacities and to catastrophic devastation. Interestingly, Bion also links faith and catastrophe, and writes of psychoanalytic "beauty", thereby creating a rich dance of psychoanalysis with Kabbalah. Winnicott adds his own special touch, associating the fate of a vital spark with trauma as the personality begins to form, and with the work of spontaneous recovery that is a profound part both of living and of therapy sessions. The second part of the book is new and focuses on birth processes at different ages and situations, exploring in detail how psychoanalysis interweaves with themes from life, clinical work, and Kabbalah. Failed birth processes are part of living but so is the need to "midwife" existence. Eigen suggests that there may be some kind of "organ" that permeates, scans, and tastes shifting centers of experience, taking note of their fate and partnering their development - a kind of inner tuning sense in search of cultivation, spanning what we call conscious and unconscious life, mind and body, and testing the weather for favorable birth conditions. Often we do not know exactly what is happening or how, but sense something germinating. Domains open that are not confineable or restricted by the tools at hand - which is perhaps one reason why analysts are called toolmakers, as experience and the tools used to understand it become part of further birth processes. In this way, Eigen shows how the intimate fusion of psychological and spiritual currents generate new tastes of living.

List price: $21.99

Your Price: $17.59

You Save: 20%

 

4 Slices

Format Buy Remix

CHAPTER ONE Beauty and destruction

PDF

1

CHAPTER TITLE

CHAPTER ONE

Beauty and destruction

[A meditation bell sounds to call attention to the beginning of the meeting.]

t’s my pleasure to welcome you. I’m James Ogilvie and on behalf of the Contemplative Studies Project of the New York University

Postdoctoral Program I want to welcome you for the ongoing bell that rings and rings and rings from Mike Eigen. Some of you saw the announcement that Mike was promising an adventure today. Mine started on the way down, finding my way through the bike tour the city scheduled, and thinking about the caesura of Sixth Avenue that could not be crossed. So it has got me in a very receptive mood and

I’m sure we’re in for a real treat today. So without taking anymore time I just want to welcome you and thank Mike again for being here with us today.” [Applause]

I

*  *  *

I don’t know how many of you have played with meditation bells, but, you know, after it seems to stop, it is still going on. Before our

 

Chapter One - Beauty and Destruction

ePub

[A meditation bell sounds to call attention to the beginning of the meeting.]

“It's my pleasure to welcome you. I'm James Ogilvie and on behalf of the Contemplative Studies Project of the New York University Postdoctoral Program I want to welcome you for the ongoing bell that rings and rings and rings from Mike Eigen. Some of you saw the announcement that Mike was promising an adventure today. Mine started on the way down, finding my way through the bike tour the city scheduled, and thinking about the caesura of Sixth Avenue that could not be crossed. So it has got me in a very receptive mood and I'm sure we're in for a real treat today. So without taking anymore time I just want to welcome you and thank Mike again for being here with us today.” [Applause]

I don't know how many of you have played with meditation bells, but, you know, after it seems to stop, it is still going on. Before our Passover Seder, I sound a Korean gong and have the children put their ears close to it after it can no longer be heard. You should see their faces when they hear the quiet waves of sound continuing and continuing, fading that never seems to stop. More, more. The quieter it gets, it is still going. And then, special silence.

 

CHAPTER TWO On the birth of experience

PDF

CHAPTER TWO

On the birth of experience

he mystery of dreams is deeply connected with the birth of experience. We have an urge to know what dreams mean but often take for granted the field of perception that make dreams possible. Could dreams exist without the seamless perceptual world that seems effortlessly given to us? Dreams make use of the objects of daily life, sky, earth, water, mountains, people, dramas, and, above all, emotions that populate our objects, fear, dread, desire, care, reaching for fulfilment, loss. I say reaching for fulfilment for, I suspect, more dreams abort fulfilment than achieve it. Dreams often express fragmentary states, aborted states, states that break off before a successful end. As if dreams attempt to communicate something unsatisfactory about our fragmentary lives.

One can also posit the opposite, that the perception of our world we take for granted depends on unconscious dream-work. Freud writes that experience of the external world is made possible by projection of internal space. If what he calls “the it” (das Es) is the primary psychical reality and ego and superego develop from it, these structures require “space”. This view posits the first space as internal psychical space out of contact with external reality that plays a role in structuring growing experience of externality. If the “it” helps to

 

Chapter Two - On the Birth of Experience

ePub

The mystery of dreams is deeply connected with the birth of experience. We have an urge to know what dreams mean but often take for granted the field of perception that make dreams possible. Could dreams exist without the seamless perceptual world that seems effortlessly given to us? Dreams make use of the objects of daily life, sky, earth, water, mountains, people, dramas, and, above all, emotions that populate our objects, fear, dread, desire, care, reaching for fulfilment, loss. I say reaching for fulfilment for, I suspect, more dreams abort fulfilment than achieve it. Dreams often express fragmentary states, aborted states, states that break off before a successful end. As if dreams attempt to communicate something unsatisfactory about our fragmentary lives.

One can also posit the opposite, that the perception of our world we take for granted depends on unconscious dream-work. Freud writes that experience of the external world is made possible by projection of internal space. If what he calls “the it” (das Es) is the primary psychical reality and ego and superego develop from it, these structures require “space”. This view posits the first space as internal psychical space out of contact with external reality that plays a role in structuring growing experience of externality. If the “it” helps to pressure early dreaming processes into existence, partly as a medium dedicated to representing “it-reality”, we might say “it” dreams reality into existence as it seeks (creates) more space to extend and exercise itself.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
9781781813744
Isbn
9781781813744
File size
0 Bytes
Printing
Disabled
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
No
Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata