Lonely Planet Chicago

Views: 813
Ratings: (0)

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher

Lonely Planet Chicago is your passport to all the most relevant and up-to-date advice on what to see, what to skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Gaze out over the city from the heights of the Willis Tower, chow down on local specialities such as the famed deep-dish pizza, or join the locals at a baseball game; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Chicago and begin your journey now!

Inside Lonely Planet's Chicago Travel Guide:

  • Full-color maps and images throughout
  • Highlights and itineraries show you the simplest way to tailor your trip to your own personal needs and interests
  • Insider tips save you time and money, and help you get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots
  • Essential info at your fingertips - including hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, and prices
  • Honest reviews for all budgets - including eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, and hidden gems that most guidebooks miss
  • Cultural insights give you a richer and more rewarding travel experience - including architecture, cuisine, history, politics, music, sports, art, sculpture, dance, literature, theater and comedy.
  • Free, convenient pull-out Chicago city map (included in print version), plus over 37 color maps
  • Useful features - including Walking Tours, Travel with Children and Month by Month (annual festival calendar).
  • Coverage of the Loop, Near North & Navy Pier, Gold Coast, Lincoln Park & Old Town, Lake View & Wrigleyville, and more

eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices)

  • Zoom-in maps and images bring it all up close and in greater detail
  • Downloadable PDF and offline maps let you stay offline to avoid roaming and data charges
  • Seamlessly flip between pages
  • Easily navigate and jump effortlessly between maps and reviews
  • Speedy search capabilities get you to what you need and want to see
  • Use bookmarks to help you shoot back to key pages in a flash
  • Visit the websites of our recommendations by touching embedded links
  • Adding notes with the tap of a finger offers a way to personalize your guidebook experience
  • Inbuilt dictionary to translate unfamiliar languages and decode site-specific local terms

The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Chicago, our most comprehensive guide to Chicago, is perfect for those planning to both explore the top sights and take the road less traveled.

  • Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet's Eastern USA guide for a comprehensive look at all the region has to offer.

Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet, Karla Zimmerman and Sara Benson.

About Lonely Planet: Started in 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel guide publisher with guidebooks to every destination on the planet, as well as an award-winning website, a suite of mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveler community. Lonely Planet's mission is to enable curious travelers to experience the world and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves in.

List price: $21.99

Your Price: $15.39

You Save: 30%

 

13 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Chicago Maps

ePub

 

The Loop

ePub

The Loop

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Exploring arty Millennium Park, where freebies beckon all day long, from morning yoga classes to afternoon splashes in Crown Fountain and evening concerts at Frank Gehry’s swooping silver band shell.

Admiring color-swirled Monets, Renoirs and one very big Seurat at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Gaping at sky-high ingenuity on a Chicago Architecture Foundation tour.

Stepping onto the glass-floored ledge and peering 1454ft straight down from Willis Tower.

Chowing huge omelets and chatting with 80-year-old waitresses at Route 66 remnant Lou Mitchell’s.

The Loop is Chicago’s center of action – its financial and historic heart – and it pulses with energy. Tumultuous tides of pinstriped businessfolk rush the sidewalks, while clattering El trains roar overhead. Above the melee, a towering forest of steel and stone soaks in the sun (or snow, as the case may be).

But it’s not all work, work, work here. The Loop is also Chicago’s favorite playground. Grant Park unfurls as a sprawling green buffer between the skyscrapers and Lake Michigan. Millennium Park is Grant’s crown jewel, sparkling in the northwest corner. Both host bashes galore, especially in summer when everything from Blues Fest and Lollapalooza to the Grant Park Orchestra makes sweet music for the masses.

 

Near North & Navy Pier

ePub

Near North & Navy Pier

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Walking on boat-bedecked Navy Pier and taking in the views – especially from the stomach-churning 150ft Ferris wheel.

Hefting a gooey slice of deep-dish pizza at Giordano’s.

Shopping with the frenzied masses on the Magnificent Mile.

Gawping at glassy Michael Jordan in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows.

Submerging beneath Michigan Ave to knock back burgers and Schlitz beer at the Billy Goat Tavern.

The Loop may be where Chicago fortunes are made, but the Near North is where those fortunes are spent. Shops, restaurants and amusements abound. This is also where the majority of hotels roll out their welcome mats.

The epicenter is the upscale shopping haven of N Michigan Ave, aka the Magnificent Mile (Mag Mile). Stretching north from the Chicago River to Oak St, the road is silly with multistory malls, high-end department stores and outlets of big-name national chains. More than 450 shops ka-ching in the tidy span.

In the River North area, west of State St, art is the big business. What was formerly a grimy, noisy assortment of warehouses and factories has become Chicago’s most prestigious gallery district.

 

Gold Coast

ePub

Gold Coast

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Getting high at the John Hancock Center by taking the 20mph elevator to the 96th-floor lounge for a tall drink and sparkling views.

Perusing the avant-garde paintings, sculptures and videos at the Museum of Contemporary Art.

Ogling the genteel mansions on Astor St .

Examining the eerie gallstones and cadaver murals at the International Museum of Surgical Science.

Wandering along Rush St during the see-and-be-seen weekend nights.

The Gold Coast has been the address of Chicago’s crème de la crème for more than 125 years. When you stroll through the neighborhood, especially the Astor St area, you’ll take in some of the most beautiful old mansions in Chicago. One of them belonged to Hugh Hefner and was the original Playboy Mansion.

Beyond the sky-high John Hancock Center and the underappreciated Museum of Contemporoary Art, there aren’t many sights in the Gold Coast. The best way to get a feel for the neighborhood’s moneyed present is to spend an afternoon browsing luxuriant designer wares around Oak and Rush Sts, or an evening among the glittering high heels and good cheekbones of the neighborhood’s nightlife. On Friday evening, see-and-be-seen crowds glide through bars and restaurants at Rush and State Sts, where businessmen carve porterhouses while downing martinis and ogling the action – no wonder locals call the area the ‘Viagra Triangle.’ For window-shopping and people-watching, Chicago offers no finer spectacle.

 

Lincoln Park & Old Town

ePub

Lincoln Park & Old Town

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Meandering through Lincoln Park and hearing lions roar in the zoo, smelling exotic flowers in the conservatory and finding the calm of the hidden lily pool.

Laughing and drinking during an improv show at Second City.

Digging into space-age, Jetsonslike cuisine at Alinea.

Joining the fun in the sun at North Ave Beach.

Seeing a provocative play at Steppenwolf Theatre.

Lincoln Park – the green space – is the city’s premier playground. Almost 50% larger than Central Park in New York, Lincoln Park is where Chicagoans flock when the weather warms to savor the lakefront oasis of ponds, paths and exotic creatures in the free zoo.

Lincoln Park is also the name for the abutting neighborhood, which is home to the city’s yuppie population mixed with DePaul University’s large student body. The area is alive day and night with people walking dogs, riding bikes, pushing strollers and looking for a place to park so they can shop in the swanky boutiques and eat in the excellent restaurants. Add in several theaters (led by world-renowned Steppenwolf) and lively blues and rock clubs, and you’ve got a day’s worth of action here.

 

Lake View & Wrigleyville

ePub

Lake View & Wrigleyville

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Spending an afternoon in the bleachers, hot dog and Old Style beer in hand, hoping for a win at ivy-clad Wrigley Field.

Making a beer-and-bratwurst detour to the German enclave of Lincoln Square.

Hearing a soon-to-be- famous band at Metro.

Joining the thumping nightlife in Boystown.

Practicing your home-run swing in the batting cages at Sluggers.

Lake View is the overarching name of this good-time neighborhood, inhabited mostly by 20- and 30-somethings. Wrigleyville is the pocket that surrounds Wrigley Field. It’s usually well mannered by day, with an impish dose of carousing in the bars along Clark St by night.

Either the rainbow flags or the abundance of hot, well-dressed men will tip you off when you arrive in Boystown, just east of the ballpark. The well-heeled hub of Chicago’s gay community, Boystown bustles on Broadway St during the day and gets hedonistic on Halsted St at night. Head west and you’ll run into a wild shopping district centered on Belmont Ave and Clark St. The stores here cater to the lifestyle whims of local goths, punks and kitschy hipsters. Whether you need a nose ring, Fender Telecaster or vintage Morrissey T-shirt, you can count on the endearingly attitude-heavy emporiums to come through for you. The Southport Corridor, along Southport Ave between Belmont Ave and Irving Park Rd, is another rich shopping and entertainment district, but one for those who outgrew their goth lifestyle and now seek designer wares.

 

Andersonville & Uptown

ePub

Andersonville & Uptown

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Ambling along Clark Street , popping into funky shops by day and drinking and dining in gastronome taverns at night.

Listening to jazz and drinking martinis with Al Capone’s ghost at the Green Mill.

Slurping pho and bubble tea on Argyle Street.

Watching 30 plays in 60 minutes from the offbeat Neo-Futurists.

Exploring the dunes and magic hedge at Montrose Beach.

These northern neighborhoods are good for a delicious browse. Andersonville is an old Swedish enclave centered on Clark St, where timeworn European-tinged businesses and bakeries mix with new foodie restaurants, funky boutiques, vintage shops and gay and lesbian bars. Places like the butter-lovin’ Swedish Bakery carry on the legacy of the original inhabitants, but the residential streets are now home mostly to creative types, young professionals and folks who fly the rainbow flag.

Around the corner to the south, Uptown is a whole different scene. Argyle St runs through the heart of ‘Little Saigon,’ filled with pho-serving restaurants and clattering shops selling exotic goods from the homeland. Several historic theaters cluster at N Broadway and Lawrence Ave, including Al Capone’s favorite speakeasy, the Green Mill. It’s still a timeless venue to hear jazz and to tipple.

 

Wicker Park, Bucktown & Ukrainian Village

ePub

Wicker Park, Bucktown & Ukrainian Village

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Trawling for treasures – an old Devo record, a vintage pillbox hat, steel-toed boots, a mustache disguise kit – in the shops along Milwaukee Ave .

Hearing an alt-country band at the Hideout.

Squeezing into the Matchbox for a gimlet.

Digging into a flaky ‘flight’ at Hoosier Mama Pie Company.

Perusing the zines at Quimby’s.

For a taste of artsy young Chicago, wander up Milwaukee Ave near Damen Ave in Wicker Park on a Friday night. You’ll pass booming bars, packed restaurants and stages hosting indie rock on one side of the street and shushed underground author readings on the other. By Saturday morning the scene shifts to the dozens of vintage stores, record shops and brunch spots. Buttressed by the slightly fancier Bucktown and slightly scruffier Ukrainian Village, this neighborhood has a lot happening, so strap on some comfortable (hip) sneakers and take it block by block.

Working-class Central and Eastern European immigrants arrived in the late 1800s to work in the factories and breweries that used to be prevalent in the area. Although signs of the community’s past are fading fast, there are plenty of traces of the immigrants who founded it, especially in the western reaches of Ukrainian Village. A stroll here will take you past Ukrainian scrawl on shop windows, Orthodox churches and proud, if humble, corner taverns where immigrants have long quenched their thirst.

 

Logan Square & Humboldt Park

ePub

Logan Square & Humboldt Park

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Biting into a fig-and-goat-cheese-slathered elk sausage while admiring weenie-themed art after meeting the pope of encased meats at Hot Doug’s.

Flicking through sweet vinyl and playing vintage Donkey Kong at Logan Hardware.

Strolling around the lagoon and munching Puerto Rican snacks in Humboldt Park.

Hearing a fret-bending set by local bluesmen at Rosa’s Lounge.

Perusing thousands of oddball badges at the Busy Beaver Button Museum.

Sights are few and far between in Logan Square and Humboldt Park. No matter. You’re here to eat, drink and see a show. Many of Chicago’s best restaurants are tucked in along the neighborhood’s tree-shaded boulevards. These aren’t high-falutin’ places, but rather boisterous taverns and small storefronts dishing out inventive fare (Michelin-starred, in some cases) at reasonable prices. Add in retro dive bars, sudsy brewpubs and thrifty gin lounges for sipping, plus artsy music clubs for entertainment, and you’ve got a stellar Chicago night out.

 

Near West Side & Pilsen

ePub

Near West Side & Pilsen

NEAR WEST SIDE | PILSEN | WEST LOOP | GREEKTOWN | LITTLE ITALY

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Forking into a decadent meal by a celebrity chef at one of the mega-hot restaurants in the West Loop.

Wanding around forklifts and warehouses to find art hubs such as Mars Gallery.

Yelling ‘opa’ as the waiter sets your cheese aflame at a taverna in Greektown.

Admiring psychedelic paintings and colorful folk art at the National Museum of Mexican Art.

Slouching into a booth alongside Pilsen’s bohemian crowd at Skylark.

Just west of the Loop is, well, the West Loop. It’s akin to New York City’s Meatpacking District, with chic restaurants, clubs and galleries poking out between meat-processing plants. The area is booming, and it seems like a new hot chef opens a restaurant (or two) here weekly. By day it’s still a serious food-supply zone filled with forklifts and delivery trucks. At night it turns up the glamor. Stroll along the main veins of W Randolph St and W Fulton Market and you’ll get the drift.

 

South Loop & Near South Side

ePub

South Loop & Near South Side

SOUTH LOOP | CHINATOWN | NEAR SOUTH SIDE

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Sizing up Sue the T-rex, the towering totem poles and magnificent mummies at the Field Museum.

Seeing beluga whales and reef sharks swim by the glass windows at Shedd Aquarium.

Viewing the stars and Chicago skyline from Adler Planetarium.

Nibbling chestnut cakes and almond cookies at bakeries in Chinatown .

Hearing the best bluesmen in the biz bend frets at Buddy Guy’s Legends.

What you’ll see when you come to the South Loop – and come you will, since this is where the Field Museum, the Shedd Aquarium and Adler Planetarium sit on the lakeshore – is a whole lot of shiny newness. The neighborhood went development crazy in recent years with high-rise condos and Columbia College’s expansion, so it’s also home to loads of young urbanites. The Museum Campus itself is lovely, jutting out into the blue-green lake and providing skyline views. Tranquil 12th St Beach and Northerly Island offer escapes if the crowds get to be too much.

 

Hyde Park & South Side

ePub

Hyde Park & South Side

HYDE PARK | BRIDGEPORT | BRONZEVILLE

For more detail of this area see Neigbourhood Map»

Gawking at the eye-popping stained glass and horizontal design of Robie House, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie-style masterpiece.

Exploring the U-boat, doll house and mock tornado at the Museum of Science & Industry.

Strolling by Obama’s house and the other distinctive architecture in Kenwood.

Seeking out the stage where Louis Armstrong played at Meyers Ace Hardware Store.

Losing yourself in the labyrinth at 57th Street Books.

The South Side is huge, but most of the sights are concentrated in three areas: Hyde Park, home to the gargoyle-­cluttered University of Chicago; Bridgeport, a traditional Irish neighborhood that has become a pocket of cool, sprinkled with artists studios and hip restaurants; and Bronzeville, the historic heart of Chicago’s black arts and cultural scene.

In Hyde Park, the intersection of 57th St and S University Ave is a great place to start exploring the neighborhood. That’ll put you close to the brainy bookstores, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House and the site where the atomic age began. You could spend a day here easily. Architecture buffs and black-history enthusiasts should block out an afternoon for Bronzeville. Bridgeport’s bars and White Sox baseball games make it ideal for an evening visit.

 

Day Trips from Chicago

ePub

Day Trips from Chicago

Tour Frank Lloyd Wright’s studio and see a slew of homes he designed for his neighbors. Ernest Hemingway’s birthplace is here, too.

Sunny beaches, woodsy trails, ranger-guided walks and towering sand dunes feature at this national and state park combination.

Wisconsin’s biggest city has a stellar lineup of beer, motorcycles, world-class art and a ballpark of racing sausages.

These artsy towns boom in summer thanks to their golden beaches, piney breezes, fruit pies and their welcome one, welcome all mindset.

Quaint it is, with perfectly preserved, Civil War–era streets set amid rolling, cow-dotted hills by the Mississippi River.

Oak Park

This suburb spawned two famous sons: novelist Ernest Hemingway was born here, and architect Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked here from 1889 to 1909. The town’s main sights revolve around the men. For Hemingway, a low-key museum and his birthplace provide an intriguing peek at his formative years. For Wright, the studio where he developed the Prairie style is the big draw, as is a slew of surrounding houses he designed for his neighbors. Ten of them cluster within a mile along Forest and Chicago Aves (gawking must occur from the sidewalk since they’re privately owned). You could easily spend an afternoon here.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
9781743218266
Isbn
9781743218266
File size
4 KB
Printing
Disabled
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
No
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata