Medium 9781591200727

The Healing Bouquet

Views: 1092
Ratings: (0)

This book places the Bach remedies within the context of homepathic medicine and fully explores their history, as well as the philosophy behind their appropriate use.

List price: $9.99

Your Price: $7.99

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
 

14 Slices

Format Buy Remix

1. The History of the Flower Remedies: Healing, Hahnemann, and Bach

ePub

1

                          

The History of the Flower Remedies: Healing, Hahnemann, and Bach

Both the development of the Bach Flower Remedies as a system of therapeutic treatments and the subsequent shift in the goal of treatment from curing specific diseases to encouraging true healing were slow and painstaking processes. They culminated in the work of one physician, Edward Bach, but also involved the efforts of many others over a period of centuries.

Since the time of Hippocrates, medical practitioners realized that they could approach their patients’ symptoms in only one of two ways. With one approach, they would try to fight the patient’s symptoms by giving him a medicine that would artificially create a new set of symptoms that were in opposition to the symptoms he was experiencing naturally. An example would be giving a sleeping pill to a patient with insomnia—this treatment does not deal with the cause of the sleeplessness, but simply overwhelms the patient’s system and irresistibly puts him to sleep.

 

2. The Riddle of the Flower Remedies: Homeopathy, Allopathy, and Flower Essences

ePub

2

                          

The Riddle of the Flower Remedies: Homeopathy, Allopathy, and Flower Essences

As often as possible in this chapter, I want to present Bach’s ideas in his own words. To this end, I want to begin with what I think is an excellent presentation of his core philosophy as presented in his pamphlet Heal Thyself 1.

“The main reason for the failure of modern medical science is that it is dealing with results and not causes. For many centuries the real nature of disease has been masked by materialism, and thus disease itself has been given every opportunity of extending its ravages, since it has not been attacked at its origin. The situation is like to an enemy strongly fortified in the hills, continually waging guerilla warfare in the country around, while the people, ignoring the fortified garrison, content themselves with repairing the damaged houses and burying the dead, which are the result of the raids of the marauders. So, generally speaking, is the situation in medicine today; nothing more than the patching up of those attacked and the burying of those who are slain, without a thought being given to the real stronghold.

 

3. The Bach Flower Remedies: An Introduction

ePub

3

                          

The Bach Flower Remedies: An Introduction

As we look at Bach’s thirty-eight remedies one at a time, be aware that I have grouped the remedies by Bach’s seven “moods.”1 As he lists them, these moods are: Fear, Uncertainty, Insufficient Interest in Present Circumstances, Loneliness, Oversensitivity to Influences and Ideas, Despondency or Despair, and Over-Concern for the Welfare of Others. Note that some of the names for these conditions have been changed slightly in this book. I have also ordered the moods in a manner that, for me at least, makes their study more comprehensible.

Where applicable, I have also noted that a particular remedy is one of Bach’s original Twelve Healers, the remedies he saw as archetypes for the ills that plague all mankind. Also, where applicable, I have indicated that a particular remedy may be considered more of a long-term remedy or more often be used only in the short-term. This information can be of particular importance in the individualizing of combined remedies and in giving the Bach practitioner a guidepost for knowing which flower remedies act faster and which work more slowly. In the same way, when administering the remedies, it is helpful to know which are naturally more acute in their actions, and which may be considered to be more or less on the same footing as the polycrests2 or constitutional remedies in classical homeopathy. (Note that, while all Bach remedies may be used in both acute or chronic cases, some work better acutely, while others are more suited to what homeopaths would call “constitutional” treatments. Such treatments speak to long-term issues or emotional patterns and therefore are used for a longer period of time. Turn to Chapter 12 for more information about the combining of the remedies and their doses.)

 

4. Considering the First Mood: The Aspects of Fear

ePub

4

                          

Considering the First Mood: The Aspects of Fear

I start with fear because it is an animal emotion. It is perhaps our most basic negative emotional state; certainly it typifies the most basic negative experience of our inner lives and the lives we lead when inter playing with the world around us. Fear lurks around corners, under beds, in small spaces, and in front of large crowds. And we all, at some point in our lives, have clutched our chests in the middle of the night as we realized that we, too, are destined to someday die. We all experience fear many times in our lives, to one degree or another. For some of us, fear is a transitory condition. For others, it is chronic, and it defines and controls their life. It dictates how money is spent, what foods are eaten, even whether the children are allowed to go to a party or school dance.1 Therefore the remedies in this category—those for patients who fear—are always needed, in one way or another, at one time or another, by every patient. That is the reason that I list them here first.

 

5. Considering the Second Mood: The Degrees of Despair

ePub

5

                          

Considering the Second Mood: The Degrees of Despair

Henry David Thoreau wrote that most “men live lives of quiet desperation,” and, in writing it, revealed his knowledge of the human condition. How many of us have let go of joy in our day-to-day lives and replaced it with the dull sensation of depression or the ache of despair?

Simple depression may well control the lives and actions of more people than any other emotional state. The remedies in this group relate to the many millions who have lost touch with excitement and joy in life, whose lives are largely defined by a daily to-do list of responsibilities and chores that have long since ceased to challenge or interest them. In the same way, life’s relationships, which once caused the greatest excitement possible, now seem to involve only thoughtless gestures and evenings lit by the light of the television screen.

Therefore, the remedies listed in this section can be very helpful for a wide range of emotional states. They can help us rediscover who we are and our natural passions when we find ourselves in a rut. Or they can help us through times of deep despair, when the weight of the world is on our shoulders. As with the other Bach remedies, those gathered together around the range of emotions in Bach’s category of despair fall into two camps—acute and constitutional. Two remedies in this group—Sweet Chestnut and Star of Bethlehem—are often thought of as “mood” remedies, best used in acute situations and rather fleeting in their actions. The other six are typically considered to be “type” remedies, and are given for a longer period of time to help the patient change an ingrained emotional pattern. As always, however, it is best to remember that all Bach remedies can be used in acute situations. All are equally valuable in the short-term and even remedies, like Sweet Chestnut, that are most often only needed to help a patient cope with a moment of crisis, may be of value over a longer period of time. Therefore, it is best to understand the nature of a remedy and the issues to which it speaks without trying to lock in the specific uses of a given remedy. Once we come to understand the remedies to the point that we can see them acted out in actual human behavior, we can be free to use them as they are really needed.1

 

6. Considering the Third Mood: The Constraint of Doubt

ePub

6

                          

Considering the Third Mood: The Constraint of Doubt

The idea of discussing the concept of doubt in terms of constraint seems particularly apt to me, in that, in my experience, those of us who chronically feel the emotion of doubt and are motivated by it find our emotions tightened and our lives constricted as a result. This can be true whether the doubt is a small and nagging sensation or the chief feature in a given patient’s emotional landscape.

But what are we really experiencing when we say that we are “doubtful?” Like fear, doubt can be considered in two ways. Some of our most common human doubts are based in negative experiences. The woman who once was fooled into trusting a man who then deceived her will not be as willing to believe the next man. She will doubt his every word. And the patient who has already gone from doctor’s office to doctor’s office without good results will surely doubt the next doctor’s ability to bring about a cure, no matter how much that doctor insists that he and he alone has the skill necessary to put things right.

 

7. Considering the Fourth Mood: Self Versus Others: Oversensitivity to the World

ePub

7

                          

Considering the Fourth Mood: Self Versus Others: Oversensitivity to the World

Life is a process. It is a process of learning. It is a process of stimulus and response. Throughout our entire lives, from birth onward, we take in impressions, and those impressions shape our experiences on an emotional, mental, and physical level. These experiences—which are born from our individual and unique responses to the stimuli that constantly assault us—teach us the realities of the world around us. Further, they suggest to us the way we should live and instruct us about the rules of conduct and behavior by which life is governed.

Whether we live in a big city and are constantly assaulted by traffic, noise, bright lights, and the crush of the crowd or in a rural environment, our minds and bodies are confronted each day with new sensory stimuli. Each day we have new thoughts and new moods, and undergo a wide range of fleeting emotional states. Our responses are broadly based upon our experiences as well as on our environment and the stresses and challenges that it offers. No matter how beneficial or stressful our environment, we are in a constant state of action and reaction.

 

8. Considering the Fifth Mood: The Need to Control

ePub

8

                          

Considering the Fifth Mood: The Need to Control

Bach refers to this mood as “over concern for the welfare of others.” But I find that to be a bit overly polite. I think that the common bond among the remedies listed here is a need to control. That need may be borne within, and the remedy type will hold himself or herself up to powerful self judgment and high standards in life. More often than not, however, the need for control will spill out into the lives of others, with the remedy type issuing a series of lectures on how life should be led. At best, the remedy types listed here are nosy and annoying to those around them. At worst, they are as destructive in their way as any other remedy type, and can wreak havoc in the lives of others.

The types listed here, therefore, tend to be rather aggressive to some extent and in some manner. They are extroverts, at least in the way they carry their “good news” to the world or in the advice that they offer, whether it is wanted or not. All of these five distinct types share a tendency to reach out emotionally and/or intellectually to others. This places them in sharp contrast to the types gathered under the concept of doubt, which is a group of rather shy and introverted types.

 

9. Considering the Sixth Mood: The Curse of Indifference

ePub

9

                          

Considering the Sixth Mood: The Curse of Indifference

There is a denial of reality, or, at least, of present circumstances, implicit in the mood that Bach describes as the “lack of sufficient interest in present circumstances,” and that I simply call indifference. Those sharing this mood also share a certain unwillingness, either an unwillingness to deal with situations the patient feels were thrust upon him, or an unwillingness to exert the physical or emotional energy it would take to transform those situations for the better. Either way, those sharing this mood find themselves in a state of stasis, as if they were not wholly present within their bodies, and they seek to find a way to escape the present situation.

The survival strategies adapted by each of these remedy types involve indifference. Each is a variation of a theme in which the remedy type shows little interest in their surroundings and in the needs and wants of others. Some, like Wild Rose, have all but totally given up on the idea of change and transformation and have settled instead in a mindset that is resigned to fate as it is perceived and shows no interest in life as a result. To a lesser degree, Clematis and Honeysuckle share this sense of resignation. Clematis escapes into a dream state and Honeysuckle escapes into the past, which is seen as a better place and time. Mustard and Olive share a sense of weight and exhaustion. Mustard carries the weight of emotional exhaustion and clinical depression. Olive struggles with an actual physical state of depletion and exhaustion.

 

10. Considering the Seventh Mood: The Faces of Loneliness

ePub

10

                          

Considering the Seventh Mood: The Faces of Loneliness

Perhaps if we are truly secure and happy with our true self, we can never be lonely. But the fact that Bach has gathered together the three remedies in this small group for the sake of those who are lonely suggests that Bach himself felt that loneliness is universal, like despair and fear, and that none of us are truly secure within ourselves. The remedies gathered here are those that will allow us to soothe our complaints relating to the void within ourselves that we call loneliness, and allow us to be brought into a state of emotional balance in which we can be fully at peace with self.

Each of the three remedies in this group feels the hollow core of loneliness, and each displays a different pattern of emotion, thought, and behavior as a result.

The remedies gathered here are those that will allow us to soothe our complaints relating to the void within ourselves that we call loneliness, and allow us to be brought into a state of emotional balance in which we can be fully at peace with self.

 

11. Taking Cases

ePub

11

                          

Taking Cases

If I were writing strictly about homeopathy in these pages, I would just state the “three laws of cure” as Samuel Hahnemann developed them and, in doing so, give you a solid basis for the use of the remedies. All homeopathic treatments follow the same pattern: remedies are given singly, in the lowest possible effective potency, and with the fewest number of effective doses. And the remedy selected for use is chosen by virtue of the fact that it, in its full range of actions, most closely mirrors the physical, emotional, and mental symptoms that the patient is experiencing because of his disease.

In the same way, homeopathic philosophy teaches us that the goal of our treatment should be concurrent with the patient’s needs. Which is to say that a simple acute treatment carries with it the goal of restoring the patient to the same level of health that he enjoyed before the onset of his condition. Thus, the patient who is given a remedy because he is suffering from that cluster of symptoms we call as common cold will, at the end of the treatment, be left in the same condition that he was in before the cold. Any other more chronic conditions, such as sciatica, will be left untouched by the treatment.

 

12. Combining Remedies

ePub

12

                          

Combining Remedies

When we begin working with Bach’s remedies, it is best to remember that Bach felt that all of us need all thirty-eight remedies, some perhaps more generally in our individual lives, and others perhaps more strongly at any given moment. But we all need all of them. Therefore, we truly cannot make a mistake in giving or taking any of the remedies.

Remember, Bach also said that his remedies were benign. They cannot cause harm. The remedies can be mixed with any other form of treatment, from allopathic drugs to acupuncture and chiropractics.1

In fact, the only remedies I have found that do not work well when they are used concurrently with the flower remedies are Hahnemann’s homeopathic remedies. This is because they are too similar to each other in action, and because there is an issue with potency as well. Because homeopathic remedies are made in a wide range of potencies and the Bach remedies are always given in what is considered a “zero” potency or mother tincture, the potency of the homeopathically prepared remedies will overwhelm the weaker Bach remedies, while the Bach remedies will interfere with the potency of the homeopathics. Together they will disrupt when they should cure. In short, at best, they will cancel each other out, and at worst, they can create an unnecessary healing crisis. Note that, in some instances, Bach’s remedies can work well with Hahnemann’s, but only if the homeopathic remedies are given in a potency high enough to not cause interference. Therefore, if a person is on a homeopathic constitutional treatment and is given a remedy of 1M (1 part in 1,000 in the homeopathic millesimal scale) or above, one can wait a few days for that remedy to “set in” and then follow up with a Bach remedy or mixture of remedies. These will not interfere with each other and will, in fact, assist each other in their work. But given the potencies involved and the complexity of the treatment, such a combination should always be undertaken under the supervision of an experienced professional.

 

13. Rescue Remedies and Other Blends

ePub

13

                          

Rescue Remedies and Other Blends

In her loving biography, The Medical Discoveries of Edward Bach, Physician, author Nora Weeks dispels some of the myths surrounding the development of the Bach Flower Remedies. Among these myths is the story I had always heard about the discovery of Rescue Remedy.

As I understood it, Rescue Remedy was created on the fly, as a result of an emergency in which a group of Bach’s neighbors brought him a sailor who was near death from drowning. Bach ran his hand over his remedies and quickly selected five. He blended them and moistened the dying man’s lips with the mixture. Within minutes, the story goes, the man opened his eyes, fully conscious. Within days, he was well.

Nora Weeks, a close associate of Bach, tells a different story. According to Weeks Bach did not create his Rescue Remedy in a moment of need. Instead, since his remedies were a balance of herbal and homeopathic medicines, he began researching the use of remedies in combination early on. Over the years, he made a number of combinations, always closely verifying their impact. Among these different mixtures was his early version of Rescue, which only contained three remedies at first: Clematis, for fainting and unconsciousness; Impatiens, for pain; and Rock Rose, for panic. He found this Rescue to be very successful in treating a wide-range of patients in times of crisis. As he continued his research he added two more remedies: Cherry Plum, for hysteria and irrational behavior, and Star of Bethlehem, for emotional trauma. With the five remedies, Bach felt that he had his final, polished formula.

 

14. Using Bach Flower Remedies

ePub

14

                          

Using Bach Flower Remedies

Becoming truly skillful with the Bach remedies involves learning to manage your cases. It may also mean that you yourself may have to learn the lessons your patients internalize as they work with the remedies. And that you may have much to learn from the remedies themselves and from the emotional patterns—good and bad—that they mirror.

Case Management

Becoming truly skilled with any form of medical treatment, even one as benign as the Bach Flower Remedies, involves more than an understanding of the full pharmacy of medicines at your disposal. It also requires that you have some understanding of the patient who is in need of aid and of the nature of illness itself. Both Bach and Hahnemann wrote extensively about the nature of illness, the methods by which it can be safely treated, and how the patient’s natural healing system can be encouraged to return the patient to a state of balance we can equate with “good health.”

You must always ask yourself exactly what you are doing when you give any remedy or medicine. Ask yourself if there is a need to treat the patient and if you are skilled enough to treat him. You and the patient must agree on the nature of the treatment. And, finally, you and the patient must have shared expectations as to the outcome of the treatment.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000028076
Isbn
9781591200727
File size
1.98 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata