Quilt Remix: Spin Traditional Favorites into 10 Fresh Projects

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Here's music for your ears! New settings and colorways for all your favorites-Log Cabin, Nine-Patch, Irish Chain, Flying Geese, Pinwheel, and more. You'll love these quilt designs made with fresh, fun fabrics for any home.

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10 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Log Cabin

ePub

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

Crib: 40″ × 50″

Lap: 60″ × 60″

Twin: 68″ × 86″

Queen: 92″ × 88″

Log Cabin blocks are one of the indisputable classics of traditional quilting. If we take this simplicity and go big, we end up with this scrappy skyscraper of log cabins using a variety of strip widths and prints.

When choosing the fabrics, pick 8 unique prints that vary in color and design. You want to have as much contrast as possible among the large concentric loops of color that ring the quilt.

If the Sew First column is checked, then sew together the first cut strips end-to-end and press seams open before making the second cut. A 40″ width of fabric is assumed for calculations. Label your cut pieces with the loop number and size. Be sure to use the Quilt Size column to establish which strips to cut for the size quilt you are making.

∗C = crib, L = lap, T = twin, Q = queen ∗∗wof = width of fabric

Use a precise ¼″ seam allowance while sewing the strips together. Slight variations in the seam width can multiply quickly in this quilt. Press all seams to the outside.

 

Nine Patch

ePub

FINISHED BLOCK SIZE

7½″ × 7½″

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

Crib: 37½″ × 52½″

Lap: 52½″ × 60″

Twin: 75″ × 90″

Queen: 90″ × 90″

The traditional Nine-Patch block’s strict simplicity can be a pleasant showcase for fabrics. This version injects some whimsy and texture by scattering a second block with stacked circles randomly across the quilt. The print fabric pieces can be cut from yardage or 10″ × 10″ layer cake squares. Requirements for both options are listed in the yardage and cutting charts (page 10).

A 40″ width of fabric is assumed for yardage. You can randomly choose which prints to use in each of the two block types, but make sure to have a variety of prints and colors in both types. Be sure to label the sets of your fabric squares with their size.

∗Use either yardage or layer cakes for print fabric pieces. ∗∗wof = width of fabric

1. Sort the 9″ × 9″ print blocks into sets of about 8 blocks each. When sorting, make sure to evenly distribute the patterns, colors, and design styles. You want each set to be as diverse as possible.

 

Irish Chain

ePub

FINISHED BLOCK SIZE

7½″ × 7½″

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

Crib: 37½″ × 52½″

Lap: 52½″ × 67½″

Twin: 82½″ × 97½″

Queen: 97½″ × 97½″

At first glance, this Irish Chain quilt looks traditional, but then you realize there’s something that’s just not right. Easy stackand-cut assembly creates two block styles, which randomly alternate with solid blocks. The print fabric pieces can be cut from yardage or 10″ × 10″ layer cake squares. Requirements for both options are listed in the yardage and cutting charts (page 15).

∗Use either yardage or layer cakes for print fabric pieces. ∗∗wof = width of fabric

1. Stack the 9″ × 10″ solid and print blocks right sides up into sets of about 8 or 10 pieces each, alternating color and solid pieces. Each set should have an equal number of prints and solids. Line up the edges of the blocks in each set.

Tips

1. It’s easiest to work with one set at a time, cutting and sewing the entire set of blocks before moving on to the next.

2. Rotary cut through all the layers at once. It works!

 

Storm at Sea

ePub

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

Crib: 48″ × 48″

Lap: 62″ × 62″

Twin/Queen: 96″ × 96″

The traditional Storm at Sea blocks are spread over a grid, creating a wavelike optical illusion that almost seems to be moving. This version is a bit of a twister, nesting the blocks inside one another for an entirely different tunnel-like illusion.

For the crib-size quilt, the diamond and corner units in Loops 2–4 form concentric rings around the center square unit (Loop 1). Then, Outer Borders 5B and 6B are added for the lap-size quilt or Loop 5TQ is added for the twin/queen-size quilts.

∗wof = width of fabric

Refer to the quilt assembly diagrams on pages 23–24 for piece placement. Use the following directions to assemble the center square unit for Loop 1 and the corner square units for Loops 2, 3, 4, and 5TQ.

Align a small solid square in the corner of the larger print square with right sides together. Draw a line from corner to corner on the back of the solid square as shown. Sew on the line and trim, leaving a ¼″ seam allowance. Press the seam to the outside. Repeat for the remaining 3 corners.

 

Pinwheel

ePub

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

Crib: 40″ × 50″

Lap: 50″ × 60″

Twin: 70″ × 90″

Queen: 96″ × 96″

Pinwheels, already a bit of a whimsical pattern, have in this version finally come unstuck entirely and flown away under their own power.

Fabrics from 3 different colorways are used in the pinwheels. Each colorway has 3–5 different prints using similar colors while still contrasting with each other. (They should contrast with the other colorways but not too much within the colorway.)

The neutral fabric used in the pinwheels can be a solid or a subtle print. It should contrast with all colorways and the background.

The background fabric can be a solid or a subtle tone-on-tone print. It should contrast with all colorways and the neutral in the pinwheels. If you are making the lap-, twin-, or queen-size, avoid large, bold, or other prints that will make the seams obvious when pieced.

Tip

An Olfa Rotary Circle Cutter makes cutting circles easy (see Resources, page 63).

∗Minimum 40½″ wof (width of fabric) required.

∗wof = width of fabric ∗∗Background assembly instructions follow.

 

Ohio Star

ePub

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

58½″ × 73″

Every quilter knows the feeling: stare at a quilt block for too long, and you start seeing things that aren’t there. This zoomed-in Ohio Star block, for instance, features strip piecing and multiple fabrics that we’re pretty sure aren’t part of most Ohio Stars, no matter how closely you look. They do add a lot of texture though, don’t they?

Three fabric colorways make up this supersize macro Ohio Star block quilt. Each colorway is divided into 2 sets, A and B (see cutting charts on pages 34, 35, and 36), with Set A fabrics cut into 1½″ and 2½″ strips and Set B fabrics cut into 1½″ and 3½″ strips. About half of the fabrics in each colorway make up a set.

Each colorway has a variety of tones (light, medium, and dark) and print styles (floral, dots, stripes, abstract, and geometric).

Note: It’s best for all of the fat quarters within a colorway to be unique, but sometimes that’s just not possible. If you do end up with duplicates, put the matching prints in the same set. Have at least 2 unique prints per set when you divide the fat quarters into the sets.

 

Trip Around the World

ePub

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

72″ × 84″

The traditional Trip Around the World is striking but a touch too straightforward. Add in a few more worlds, though, and things start to get interesting.

Pick 3 contrasting colorways. Within each colorway, select 4 prints that vary slightly for texture. Solids or very small prints work best for this quilt.

Cut each fabric into the specified number of 2½″-wide strips. Subcut the 2½″ strips into second-cut pieces, cutting the longest pieces first, then the next longest, and so on until all the pieces have been cut.

∗wof = width of fabric

1. Working with the pieces of the first section shown in the quilt assembly diagram (below), sew each row together. When all 7 rows of the first section are complete, sew the rows together. Press the seams open as you go along. Be careful to line up the ends of the rows so the section stays rectangular.

Note: It’s important to have an accurate ¼″ seam when sewing the rows so the quilt doesn’t end up skewed. Make sure you don’t pull the fabric when pressing.

 

Dresden Plate

ePub

FINISHED BLOCK SIZE

15″ × 15″

FINISHED QUILT SIZE

Crib: 45″ × 60″

Lap: 60″ × 60″

Twin: 75″ × 90″

Queen: 90″ × 90″

This hard-edged Dresden Plate uses contrast and angles to bring an entirely new look without changing the structure of the classic pattern.

There should be a stark contrast between the solids and prints and between the prints themselves. The chart lists the minimum number of prints needed, but additional prints may be used for more variety. Precut 10″ × 10″ layer cake squares may be used instead and will give an even wider variety.

No additional cutting is needed for the layer cake squares.

∗wof = width of fabric

1. Sort the 10″ print squares into roughly equal stacks of at least 5 squares each. When sorting, make sure to evenly distribute the patterns, colors, and design styles. You want each stack to be as diverse as possible.

2. Take the first stack and spread the squares into a row. Arrange the squares, making sure no 2 matching colors or prints are next to each other and that the first and last squares are different. Stack the squares, aligning the edges for cutting. Repeat for the other stacks.

 

Lone Star

ePub

FINISHED BLOCK SIZE

Crib: 38″ × 55½″

Lap: 53½″ × 55½″

Twin: 68½″ × 92½″

Queen: 91½″ × 92½″

This version of the Lone Star has been deconstructed down to its basic elements and built back up into a lattice pattern, in the process avoiding the original’s difficult seams.

The quilt is made from 3 colorways, using several prints from each colorway. Fabrics with little contrast in the print work best.

∗cw = color way

Keep the fabric folded on the manufacturer’s fold so Piece B and its reverse (Br) and Piece C and its reverse (Cr) can be cut at the same time.

Note: The fast2cut Half- & Quarter-Diamond Rulers (see Resources, page 63) make cutting the half- and quarter-diamonds easy.

∗wof = width of fabric ∗∗cw = color way ∗∗∗A summary of the method used to make the second cuts follows this chart.

Using the fast2cut Half- & Quarter-Diamond Ruler Set, or the measurements shown in the illustration (below), cut Pieces A, B, and Br from the 8¾″ strips. Start at the selvage edge and cut the B and Br quarter-diamonds. Then cut the A half-diamonds. Make sure to cut A, B, and Br pieces from each print. Remember to allow for the ¼″ top edge of Pieces B and Br as you cut them.

 

Flying Geese

ePub

FINISHED BLOCK SIZE

81″ × 81″

Flying Geese quilts are traditionally very geometric, with orderly designs. This quilt takes the order to another level entirely by arranging square versions of a Flying Geese block in mathematical precision.

Note: If you are curious, this pattern follows the Sierpinski carpet fractal. Those aren’t typos in the cutting chart! This quilt is made of 3,803 pieces, almost all of which are easily foundation pieced.

Notes:

1. Quilter’s Freezer Paper Sheets or Carol Doak’s Foundation Paper (see Resources, page 63) make paper piecing easy.

2. These foundation pieces are cut with a ″ seam allowance all around, for ease of paper piecing.

3. Use your favorite method to foundation piece these blocks.

Photocopy or trace the foundation pattern on page 55 and make 512 of Block A, using Solid 1 (dark and light) and background fabrics placed as shown in the following illustration. Trim blocks, leaving a ¼″ seam allowance all around (3½″ × 3½″). Remove the foundation paper.

Tip

After trimming the blocks, remove the foundation paper to reduce bulk when continuing with the next step. Some quilters prefer to leave the paper on to keep the block square. It comes down to a personal preference.

 

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