Medium 9781782200864

On Freud's "Observations On Transference-Love"

Views: 956
Ratings: (0)

This is the third volume in the series Contemporary Freud: Turning Points and Critical Issues, published for the InternationalPsychoanalytical Association. Each volume presents a classic essay by Freud with commentaries by prominent psychoanalytic teachersand analysts from different theoretical backgrounds and geographical locations."Observations on Transference-Love" may have been inspired, say the contributors, by the unfortunate emotional involvements of two of Freud's colleagues with female patients. In his paper, Freud speaks of the inevitability of "transference-love" in every well-conducted analysis, its important therapeutic functions, and its potential hazards.The contributors to this volume - Ethel Spector Person, Friedrich-Wilhelm Eickhoff, Robert S. Wallerstein, Roy Schafer, Max Hernandez, Betty Joseph, Merton Max Gill, Fidias Cesio, Jorge Canestri, Takeo Doi, and Daniel N. Stern - place in the context of his evolving thinking; focus on what it tells us about love, female sexuality, and conventional morality; discuss the role of the therapist in the genesis of the patient's transference love; explore the differences between remembering, reliving, and enacting; and examine Freud's theory in light of current developments in psychoanalytic thought. Transference love is discussed in the larger context of transference in general. The essays illuminate a persistent problem in all modalities of psychotherapy: unfortunate, often tragic, enactments of erotic transference and countertransference.This volume also includes the original essay by Freud.

List price: $24.99

Your Price: $19.99

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
 

2 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

Part One: Observations on Transference-Love (1915)

ePub

PART ONE

Observations on Transference-Love (1915)

SIGMUND FREUD

 

OBSERVATIONS ON TRANSFERENCE-LOVE

(FURTHER RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE TECHNIQUE OF PSYCHO-ANALYSIS III)

EVERY beginner in psycho-analysis probably feels alarmed at first at the difficulties in store for him when he comes to interpret the patient's associations and to deal with the reproduction of the repressed. When the time comes, however, he soon learns to look upon these difficulties as insignificant, and instead becomes convinced that the only really serious difficulties he has to meet lie in the management of the transference.

Among the situations which arise in this connection I shall select one which is very sharply circumscribed; and I shall select it, partly because it occurs so often and is so important in its real aspects and partly because of its theoretical interest. What I have in mind is the case in which a woman patient shows by unmistakable indications, or openly declares, that she has fallen in love, as any other mortal woman might, with the doctor who is analysing her. This situation has its distressing and comical aspects, as well as its serious ones. It is also determined by so many and such complicated factors, it is so unavoidable and so difficult to clear up, that a discussion of it to meet a vital need of analytic technique has long been overdue. But since we who laugh at other people's failings are not always free from them ourselves, we have not so far been precisely in a hurry to fulfil this task. We are constantly coming up against the obligation to professional discretion—a discretion which cannot be dispensed with in real life, but which is of no service in our science. In so far as psycho-analytic publications are a part of real life, too, we have here an insoluble contradiction. I have recently disregarded this matter of discretion at one point,1 and shown how this same transference situation held back the development of psycho-analytic therapy during its first decade.

 

Part Two: Discussion of “Observations on Transference-Love”

ePub

A Rereading of Freud's “Observations on Transference-Love”

FRIEDRICH-WILHELM EICKHOFF

Lead the way for Europe's kings!
Give freedom of thought!
—Friedrich Schiller,
Don Karlos

Freud's inspired paper of 1915, originally entitled “Further Recommendations on the Technique of Psychoanalysis,” is scarcely ten pages long, but to this day it occupies an outstanding place in the debate on the curative significance of the interpretation of psychical conflicts versus direct emotional experience. Freud, in this paper, methodically establishes—in the context of discussing a countertransference resistance in the face of the “socially untamed passion” of the “erotic transference” of a fictitious female patient—the “fundamental principle of the analytic treatment being carried out in abstinence,” tracing this “moral prescription back to its source, namely to expediency.” Freud sees this fundamental principle as closely linked with the “neutrality” acquired “by keeping the countertransference in check.” He formulates the aim of psychoanalysis as achieving “the extra piece of mental freedom which distinguishes conscious mental activity…from unconscious.” Finally, he attributes a special status to transference love. The desire for direct gratification in the transference points to a clinical category of borderline pathology not yet known on a nosological level in 1915. Freud's allusion at the end of “Observations on Transference-Love” to the quotation from Hippocrates which Schiller used as an epigraph for his drama Die Rauber (“Quae medicamenta non sanant, ferrum sanat, quae ferrum non sanat, ignis sanat”1) suggests that he was well aware of his own revolutionary impetus. He wrote to Karl Abraham on 29 July 1914, “I have become more honest, bolder and more reckless” (Freud and Abraham, 1965).

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000021184
Isbn
9781781813058
File size
337 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata