Facilities Management

Views: 2728
Ratings: (0)

This book is aimed at all those individuals with facilities management (FM) responsibilities who are trying to get to grips with the wide and demanding range of practical issues which they currently face. Contents include: the FM scene - an introduction (the range and complexity of the facilities portfolio and the core/non-core viewpoints are discussed); facilities strategy (the importance and benefit of facilities strategy; the facilities manager as a 'change driver'; organisational synergy; outsourcing); customer focus (who are the customers; specification - input vs. output; the changing workplace; virtual organisations; CAFM and helpdesks); facilities performance (service level agreements; monitoring; benchmarking; space management/cost of space; best value approach; quality and standards); risk management (statutory compliance; training and development; succession planning; core competencies); future directions and challenges.

List price: $95.00

Your Price: $76.00

You Save: 20%

 

40 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Core vs. non-core activity

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Service delivery

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Developing an FM strategy

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

The facilities manager as the change driver

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Organisational synergy

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Re-engineering

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Strategic outsourcing

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

The European procurement process for goods and services (public bodies)

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Partnering

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

The Private Finance Initiative (PFI)

ePub

CHAPTER 1

Facilities Strategy

CORE v NON-CORE ACTIVITY

The traditional view of facilities management (FM) has been that of a non-core or pure support function which is often seen to be at arm’s length to the main thrust or activities of the organisation. Certainly in the early days of FM much emphasis was placed upon facilities taking control of and managing all of the non-critical or non-core functions – which would then enable the organisation to focus on the main business agenda and the core issues that it might be facing. Clearly there are benefits relating to cost, staffing and management overheads associated with combining the management of support functions under one facilities umbrella. Additional benefit is achieved by breaking down traditional demarcation boundaries and combining service functions in an innovative manner – cutting out duplication and wasteful practice. Increasingly organisations are now beginning to realise the true potential of FM services and recognise that they are more than just pure support functions that are limited to operational service delivery. The evolving nature of FM and the maturity of its approach – which is grounded in the experience of a buoyant and growing profession, has begun to ensure that a strategic FM dimension is now a requirement for all successful and forward-thinking organisations. This has largely been driven by the realisation of the cost of FM services and the potential impact to the bottom line. The effective communication of the benefits that a facilities strategy can bring can only serve to move facilities and its profile up to another level within the organisation. For facilities to develop a truly comprehensive and successful strategy the facilities manager must develop an appreciation of the core activities of the host organisation so that facilities are able to influence directly and indirectly the organisational strategy (this strategic dimension is discussed in further detail later in this chapter). This suggests that facilities need to develop shared values and synergy in order to align themselves with the host organisation – in order, that is, to be considered a truly proactive management function.

 

Specification

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

Input vs. output specifications

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

Service level agreements

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

Service charters

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

Who are the ‘customers’ of FM services?

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

The intangible nature of services

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

Service recovery strategy

ePub

CHAPTER 2

Customer Focus

This chapter will concentrate on the principles of customer focus and the concept of providing a ‘seamless’ one-stop shop for facilities services which will ensure that facilities services are accessible and appropriate and can serve the requirements of both the host organisation and the customer. However, to do this is it is vital initially to identify:

Who the customer is.

The chapter will highlight the difficulties that can be encountered when applying established organisational and management theory into practice in a practical or work-based setting. Areas of conflict will be highlighted in relation to user needs vs. organisational needs (i.e. micro vs. macro issues). The importance of effective and relevant service specifications will be reinforced, demonstrating that the service specification forms the blueprint of effective service delivery and that specifications can be either input or output based. If the specification is the blueprint for service delivery then service level agreements are vital to underpin the construction of solid and reliable service delivery. Statistics show that there are real benefits in developing an effective service recovery strategy for the instances when service delivery goes wrong, that is effective corrective action applied ‘right time – first time’.

 

Monitoring

ePub

CHAPTER 3

Facilities Performance and Service Quality

This chapter will look at the benefits of performance monitoring and tools such as benchmarking. The value of space within the organisation will be discussed along with the methodology for conducting a space audit in order to assess if the space that an organisation occupies is efficiently utilised or if there is unlocked potential to ‘reshuffle the deck’ and use space in a different manner by adopting different work processes and patterns. The latter part of this chapter will concentrate on service quality and how to identify the gaps that may exist between customer perception and expectation.

Facilities services are fairly fluid and because of this a process of constant realignment and performance monitoring is required along with customer feedback to ensure that the service provision mirrors the service requirement. Intangibles are dominant in ‘pure service delivery’ and tangibles are dominant in ‘pure goods’. Goods or tangibles are by and large purchased remote from the provider, often in a retail setting or an environment away from the production area. The intangible nature of services (see Chapter 2), on the other hand, means that the majority of service encounters are conducted ‘in the factory’ with the provider and the purchaser face to face, that is the service is simultaneously produced and consumed during the ‘moment of truth’. This presents a unique set of problems with respect to the monitoring and managing of such ‘moments of truth’. The vast majority of service encounters are based upon performance which is largely dependent on the interpersonal skills and training of the service provider at the point of contact. Effective training and empowerment of front-line staff is therefore essential if they are to produce a steady state or constant level of service and feel confident enough to make what they consider to be the right decision when they are required to do so. The concept of the ‘servicescape’ will reinforce the links between physical and environmental influences and their effect on the outcome of the overall service provision. This concept links intangible elements with tangibles, enabling the service to be developed to take into account the effect of these external influencing factors, or to be tailored to suit a particular environment – to present a feel of the ‘total facilities experience’ (service wrapping).

 

Load more


Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
2370004682365
Isbn
9781909287242
File size
0 Bytes
Printing
Disabled
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
Yes
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata