Medium 9780982259269

Vocabulary Games for the Classroom

Views: 1899
Ratings: (0)

Make direct vocabulary instruction fun and successful with this simple, straightforward, and easy-to-use book. Hundreds of critical vocabulary terms handpicked by Dr. Marzano cover four content areas and all grade levels. Each game identifies the appropriate grade level and subject area, as well as whether or not the students should already be familiar with the vocabulary.

List price: $33.99

Your Price: $27.19

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
 

14 Slices

Format Buy Remix

1 - Word Harvest

ePub

For lower elementary language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

This game is modeled after the game Apple Picking in Susan L. Kasser's (1995) book Inclusive Games: Movement Fun for Everyone! However, where that game focuses only on movement, Word Harvest focuses on vocabulary as well. It is best for lower elementary students, and uses terms from language arts, math, science, and social studies. Teachers in a self-contained classroom can use a variety of terms from different content areas as well as general literacy terms. Because students will need a working understanding of the terms and phrases used in the game, select only those with which they will be familiar.

Materials

You will need construction paper and/or poster board (brown, green, and red), scissors, tape, two buckets or baskets, and note cards.

Set Up

To set up the game, begin by writing one “word category” on each note card. For example, you might write “colors” for a category that includes different words for colors (such as red or purple) or “time” for a category that includes words depicting increments of time (such as second and minute). You can use the word categories we have crafted in the vocabulary list on pages 9-11, or create your own. If you choose to create your own, be sure to consider the size of the categories you choose. Each category should include approximately the same number of terms or phrases. For example, if you choose ten terms that belong in a category called “clothing” (words like skirt or shoe), then the other categories you choose should also have roughly ten words each. We recommend each category have between five and ten words.

 

2 - Name It!

ePub

For lower elementary language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

This game is modeled after the game Peanut Butter and Jelly in Susan L. Kassers (1995) book Inclusive Games: Movement Fun for Everyone! However, the game in that book focuses only on movement while this game focuses on vocabulary as well. It is best played with lower elementary students, and can include general vocabulary terms as well as relevant terms from any of the four main content areas (language arts, math, science, and social studies). Students will need to have been introduced to the relevant terms and phrases and have a working understanding of them.

Materials

You will need a chalkboard or whiteboard, a large bucket or basket, and pictures or illustrations of the terms you will be using. For example, if you want to use the term bear, you will need a picture or illustration of a bear. Because this game involves the use of many images, you should feel free to include your students in the process of obtaining them. Students might create illustrations themselves, or they might find them in books at home or in the classroom or on the Internet. Once students find images, they should give them to you for approval and safe keeping until game day.

 

3 - Puzzle Stories

ePub

For upper elementary and middle school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

Puzzle Stories gets its name from the overall object of the game: to create a story based on the image on a puzzle. It is best played with upper elementary or middle school students, but can be modified for lower elementary or high school students as well. In addition to increasing vocabulary, this game can be used to practice writing skills and enhance creativity. It can be played using terms from any of the four main content areas (language arts, math, science, and social studies), but is probably the most easily adapted to language arts, social studies, and science classes. Students will need to have a working understanding of the terms and phrases used.

Materials

You will be splitting the class into small groups for this game and will need as many puzzles as you have groups. For example, if your class splits evenly into five groups, you will need five puzzles. The puzzles you select should be easy to put together. They should also depict a simple scene, such as a hummingbird sucking nectar or a sailboat on the sea. The idea is simply to give students a starting place and then let them apply vocabulary terms and phrases and make use of their creativity. You also need a chalkboard or whiteboard.

 

4 - Two of a Kind

ePub

For lower and upper elementary general vocabulary

Design

Two of a Kind is modeled after the game Memory and focuses on homonyms. It is best suited for building the general vocabulary of elementary students. Students must have familiarity with the words being used.

Materials

You will need blank note cards.

Set Up

In advance, write one word (a homonym) on each note card, leaving the other side of the card blank. For example, if you write steel on one card, write steal on another. Create a master set of cards constituted by pairs of homonyms (between five and fifteen pairs works best), then make enough copies of the set to distribute among your students. The class will be broken up into small groups or pairs, and each group will need an identical set of cards.

Before playing, set up a separate station for each group by laying the cards facedown in rows. The idea is that when they begin, none of the students know what or where any of the words in their set of cards are.

 

5 - Opposites Attract

ePub

For lower and upper elementary general vocabulary

Design

Opposites Attract gets its name from its focus on antonyms. It can be used for building the general vocabulary of lower and upper elementary students. Students should have a working understanding of the terms and phrases used.

Materials

You will need blank note cards and tape.

Set Up

In advance, write one word in big letters on one note card and its antonym on another card. For example, if you write inside on one card, write outside on the other. Each set of card should have complete pairs of antonyms, and there should be as many cards as there are students in the class.

Play

Each student is given a card with a word written on it. Once the student has read and understands the word, he tapes it to his shirt so that other students will be able to easily see and read it. On your cue, everyone walks around the room and reads the words on other students' cards. Each student is looking for his or her antonym. For example, if a student's word is giant, she would be looking for someone with a word like tiny.

 

6 - Magic Letter, Magic Word

ePub

For lower and upper elementary or middle school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

Magic Letter, Magic Word asks students to use clues they are given (including a “magic letter”) to find the “magic” vocabulary term or phrase. Students need to have a good understanding of the terms and phrases to play this game. It is best played with lower and upper elementary students but can be modified for middle school students as well.

Materials

The only material necessary is a chalkboard or white board.

Set Up

In advance, create a list of vocabulary terms and phrases and corresponding “clues.” The object of the game is for the students to use these clues to find the correct term or phrase. For example, assume you want students to understand the term astronomy. You might provide the following clue: “The study of objects in space is called_________________” Or, if you are looking for a term such as Wednesday that comes in a sequence (the sequence of the days of the week), you might provide the following clue: “Sunday, Monday, Tuesday,_________________” You can also provide a brief definition as a clue. For example, if you are looking for the phrase president of the United States, you might provide this clue: “He lives in the White House.” Finally, synonyms make good clues. For example, if the term you are looking for is proofread, you might provide the following clue: “Another word for edit”

 

7 - Definition Shmefinition

ePub

For upper elementary through high school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

This game, modeled after Balderdash, requires little or no knowledge of the relevant terms and phrases. In fact, the fun of the game is not knowing the definitions. It can be played in any content area (language arts, math, science, and social studies), and is best suited to upper elementary through high school students.

Materials

You will need a basket or bowl and a dictionary.

Set Up

Prepare a list of at least ten to twenty terms ahead of time (only you will see the list). Be sure the definitions for your terms are in a dictionary or similar reference book.

Play

First, break the class into teams of three, four, or five. Give one team the dictionary. You begin by writing the first term on the board and saying it aloud. On your signal, the team with the dictionary looks up the real definition of the term and writes it down while the other teams work together to come up with their best guess as to what the word means. They can use knowledge of prefixes, roots, and suffixes as well as any background knowledge. For example, if a fifth-grade class is analyzing the word autobiography, one student might pick up on the root auto- and suggest the word had something to do with performing an action without thought, like automatic. Another student might know that a biography is the story of someone's life because she sees her dad reading biographies at home. The group might put together these and other suggestions to write the definition, “Autobiography: the things in life we all know are boring but still have to do.” You might even ask students to write the word in a sentence. Their definition will probably not be correct, but the important thing is that students have seen and started thinking about the word.

 

8 - Which One Doesn't Belong?

ePub

For lower elementary through high school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

This game is modeled after the one played on the children's television show Sesame Street, though it is more versatile as described here. It can be played in elementary through high school classes in any of the four major subject areas (language arts, math, science, and social studies), and can be tailored to students who have very little knowledge of the content terms and phrases, students who are practicing and deepening their knowledge, or students who have a firm grasp of the vocabulary. The idea, as the name implies, is that students look at a group of terms or phrases and pick out the one that does not belong.

Materials

You will be splitting the class into pairs or teams, and each team will need a flag (or something to signify when they are ready to provide an answer). You will also need a chalkboard or whiteboard.

Set Up

Prepare the sets of terms or phrases beforehand, with each set consisting of three terms that share some common theme or link, and one term that “does not belong.” For example, if you choose the terms yellow, green, and blue, you would choose a fourth term that is not a color word, such as one or coin. You need between ten and thirty sets, depending on how familiar the students are with the terms and phrases you have chosen and how challenging you want the game to be.

 

9 - Who Am I?

ePub

For upper elementary through high school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

Who Am I? requires that the students have a relatively deep understanding of the terms and phrases being used. Usually, the game is played using the names of important people being studied, and the students must have an understanding of those people and the time in which they lived. This game is rooted in vocabulary, but it is unique in that it requires students to apply what they already know about the terms, therefore reinforcing their knowledge. It can be played in any of the main subjects (language arts, math, science, and social studies) with upper elementary through high school students.

Materials

You will need large note cards and a baseball or top hat.

Set Up

Prepare in advance by writing the name of someone your class has been studying on each card. For example, if you have been teaching a unit on the civil rights movement, you might write “Martin Luther King Jr.” on one card, “Medgar Evers” on another, and so on. You need at least as many terms as there are students in the class.

 

10 - Where Am I?

ePub

For lower elementary math and lower and upper elementary social studies

Design

This game is named Where Am I? because its object is for students to find a specific location using relevant directional coordinates and landmarks. It can be used as both review and application at the elementary level in math or the elementary and middle school levels in social studies. Students should be familiar enough with the terms and phrases to apply them independently.

Materials

You will need a map for every student, or pair of students, in your class. The map you use depends on the vocabulary terms and phrases you select. For example, an elementary math teacher using terms such as right, left, under, and above would want a map that allows students to use these terms. That map might depict a school or a house. Conversely, a middle school social studies teacher who wants to use state names and terms such as north, south, east, and west would want a very different map, perhaps one depicting the entire country and all of its major highways.

 

11 - Create a Category

ePub

For upper elementary through high school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

Create a Category gets its name from its focus on categorization. The object is for students to create as many different categories of words as possible based on a given list of terms and phrases. It can be used in upper elementary through high school classes in all four major content areas (language arts, math, science, and social studies). It requires a working understanding of the relevant terms and phrases.

Materials

You will need a chalkboard or whiteboard.

Set Up

In advance, prepare word lists. Four to eight lists of fifteen to twenty words work well. The terms you choose should be similar enough to allow students to categorize them in ways discussed in class, but disparate enough for students to use creativity in creating categories as well.

Play

The game can be played by breaking students into teams, or each student can work alone. After you write or display the first list of words on the board, the students' job is to categorize three or more terms in as many ways as they can think of. At the end of an allotted period of time, each group shares what categories they came up with and what terms are in those categories. Points may be assigned based on the number of categories generated.

 

12 - What Is the Question?

ePub

For upper elementary, middle, and high school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

What Is the Question? is modeled after Jeopardy! It can be played in any of the four main content areas (language arts, math, science, and social studies) and is best for upper elementary, middle, and high school students. A working knowledge of relevant terms and phrases is necessary.

Materials

The material needs for this game vary. If you are taking a pencil-and-paper approach, you will need to design a creative game board. You can also use a chalkboard or whiteboard and tape sheets of paper over the answers, or you can create something more sophisticated. If you want a more authentic feel, you can download the Classroom Jeopardy software and customize your game items (www.classroomjeopardy.com). Classroom Jeopardy does have some pre-programmed game cartridges, but none of them focus specifically on vocabulary. Whatever you use, you will need a game board like the one on Jeopardy! (see figs. 12.1 and 12.2, page 92, for examples). Finally, you will need something for each team to signal your attention. Flags or small bells work well. Note that figure 12.1 displays what the game board for a self-contained classroom might look like, and figure 12.2 displays a sample board for a language arts class.

 

13 - Classroom Feud

ePub

For lower and upper elementary, middle, and high school language arts, math, science, and social studies

Design

Classroom Feud, modeled after the game show Family Feud, can be used as review in any of the four major content areas (language arts, math, science, and social studies) at the lower and upper elementary, middle, and high school levels.

Materials

The material needs for this game vary. If you are using a pencil-and-paper approach, you will need note cards. If you want to display the game questions, you will need an overhead projector or something similar.

Set Up

As with What Is the Question?, prepare the game questions ahead of time. Make sure there are at least as many questions as there are students in the class. You can use multiple-choice, short-answer, or fill-in-the-blank formats for your questions, but make sure you have approximately an even number of questions using each format. For example, if you have five multiple-choice questions, it is best to have five fill-in-the-blank questions as well. Also keep in mind that fill-in-the-blank items are more difficult because they require the student to recall the answer, while multiple-choice and alternative-choice items require only that students recognize the correct answer. Students will have a very limited period of time to answer, so if you are using a short-answer format, make sure your questions allow for complete answers to be given quickly.

 

Appendix

ePub

Table of Contents

Language Arts Terms

Lower Elementary

Upper Elementary

Middle School

High School

Mathematics Terms

Lower Elementary

Upper Elementary

Middle School

High School

Science Terms

Lower Elementary

Upper Elementary

Middle School

High School

Social Studies Terms

Lower Elementary

General History

Civics

Economics

Geography

Upper Elementary

U.S. History

World History

Civics

Economics

Geography

Middle School

U.S. History

World History

Civics

Economics

Geography

High School

U.S. History

World History

Civics

Economics

Geography

The appendix contains academic terms only. It does not necessarily contain general vocabulary terms to be used for the games Word Harvest, Name It!, Two of a Kind, or Opposites Attract. For an extensive list of general vocabulary terms, consult Teaching Basic and Advanced Vocabulary: A Framework for Direct Instruction (Marzano, 2009). Each word is coded as a noun or noun phrase (n); a proper noun (pn); a verb (v); an adjective or adverb (adj/adv); or a preposition or prepositional phrase (p). Use these codes to help you choose terms for games. If a term or phrase can be used in more than one way, more than one code appears. Table A.1 is a reminder of the number of terms in each content area for lower elementary, upper elementary, middle school, and high school, and table A.2 is a reminder of the number of social studies terms in each category at the lower elementary, upper elementary, middle school, and high school levels.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000029500
Isbn
9781935543114
File size
1.7 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata