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Coaching in the Family Owned Business: A Path to Growth

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This book aims to showcase scholarly work from leading coaching psychologists and coaches from different parts of the world, with an expectation that each author will provide thoughtful analysis of group dynamics, family systems and psychotherapeutic approach to family business coaching. The book will thus provide both a theoretical groundwork and a practical application of group dynamic issues to family business coaching practices. The book is expected to provide a key reference book for family businesses, practitioners, business coaches, researchers, postgraduate students and coaching profession. It is believed to serve as an essential compendium for the coaching psychology, and a useful groundwork to understanding group dynamics of a family business. It is also expected to provide practitioner's input in family business coaching practices, with specific reference to knowledge enhancement, and developing innovative and reflective coaching practices appropriate to family businesses around the world. The book offers a new outlook of partnership between group dynamics and family businesses in diverse settings. The book has thus a far-reaching goal to benefit coaching profession at a global level.

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CHAPTER ONE: Key issues in family business coaching

ePub

Manfusa Shams

Introduction

Coaching as a practice is a vibrant area, developing continuously with the demands from different disciplines. One such new development is “coaching psychology”, and the gradual emergence of family business coaching embedded within coaching psychology. This area is still too immature to suggest any definite framework upon which family business coaching is built. However, we were able to gather together existing practices in order to present key issues based on these cumulative coaching practices for family businesses. One of the fundamental issues is whether the concept “coaching” can be applied universally to all coaching practices. To answer this question, we have to look into the meaning of coaching. The following sections will make an attempt to find the existing definitions of coaching, main features, and, finally, the definition of family business coaching.

What is coaching?

The best way to answer this is to get an overview of the existing definitions and then extrapolate key terms from the existing definitions of coaching. The focus of this book is coaching psychology, hence only a few recent simple and complex definitions of coaching will be presented, followed by an evaluation of each definition to suggest common key features and the underlying meaning of the definition provided for coaching.

 

CHAPTER TWO: Recent developments in family business coaching psychology

ePub

Manfusa Shams

Introduction

There has been steady progress in the development of coaching psychology in the UK, but systematic discussion of different types of coaching has not yet been fully undertaken. This chapter aims to present an overview of the recent developments in family business coaching with particular attention to recent innovative coaching practices for family businesses. Examples will be drawn from authors’ own personal experiences, and from existing research to suggest future directions for family business coaching.

Research initiatives, institutional movement, and groundwork
for coaching—where does family business coaching stand?

There has been an upsurge of initiatives to move coaching psychology to the forefront of practitioners’ agendas in order to popularize coaching in the domain of psychology. For example, the special coaching psychology group within the British Psychological Society was set up in 2005 with the aim of developing a distinct area of psychology with an immense practical value, of benefit to both individuals and organizations. Following this project, several other initiatives were developed, such as the “Association of Coaching Psychology” or the “Coaching Psychology Network”, together with the development of coaching psychology courses in various universities and private training institutions. Further work to publicize coaching psychology is being carried out through conferences, workshops, forums, and media exposure. These academic and commercial activities are providing the groundwork for the development of coaching psychology in the UK. The movement is in its early stage: family business coaching is yet to take its place in its own right as a distinct coaching practice, encompassing family dynamics and coaching models, with an eagerness to include family psychotherapy and counselling models in practice. However, the challenges between business coaching and family business coaching from a psychological viewpoint need to be addressed so that a complimentary approach, rather than a competitive one, can be considered for the benefit of coaching practices, for businesses in general, and for family businesses specifically. What is promising is the growing interest in establishing family business coaching as a very useful practical tool to benefit both families and businesses. This interest will have a far-reaching goal to the development of coaching practices for the family by the family members.

 

CHAPTER THREE: An integrative coaching approach for family businesses

ePub

Helen Williams, Stephen Palmer, and Emma Wallace

Introduction

The solution-focused, problem-solving approach provides tangible, goal-focused models for effective coaching within family businesses. Models such as PRACTICE (Palmer, 2002, 2007, 2008) offer a clear, practical structure for discussion and a sequential process for the coach and coachee to follow in order to achieve measurable outcomes. There may be times, however, when the coachee is confronted with psychological blocks or obstacles. In these instances an “intrinsically brief integrated approach” (Palmer, 1997a,b) may be appropriate, whereby Stress Mapping and cognitive–behavioural approaches, such as the ABCDEF model (Ellis, 1994; Ellis, Gordon, Neenan, &Palmer, 1997; Palmer, 2002), are effectively integrated into the solution-focused process in order to increase the likelihood of coaching success (Palmer, 1997a,b).

This chapter provides an overview of the PRACTICE model, Stress Mapping, and ABCDEF model in turn, followed by practical guidelines and an illustrative example to demonstrate how these models may be integrated effectively. A personal account from a coaching client further illustrates the potential power of cognitive behavioural coaching in the family business context.

 

CHAPTER FOUR: Intercultural coaching approach for Asian family businesses

ePub

Ho Law

Introduction

This chapter aims to show how coaching psychology can be applied across cultures in assisting Asian family business owners to develop their business further in terms of succession and ethical governance. In particular, Law’s (2007) narrative coaching approach, within the Universal Integrative Framework (UIF), is singled out to illustrate its applicability within the business and cultural context. We shall first present the reasons for cross-cultural coaching being important for Asian family businesses. Some definitions of key terms on intercultural coaching are provided. This is followed by a description of models of family business evolution and UIF narrative coaching respectively. A case study is provided to show how UIF narrative coaching was applied to help an Asian business owner to further develop his business. Major developmental gaps are highlighted and six ethical principles are provided for consideration to be used for business owners and coaches. Finally, we conclude with some suggestions for future research and developments.

 

CHAPTER FIVE: Dealing with relationship issues in a family business from a coaching context Elspeth May

ePub

Elspeth May

Introduction

Families are something all of us know something about, even if we know nothing of business. There are moral and social obligations that bind us closely to our family. There is something tribal about being part of a family: it affects our sense of identity. We think of a tribe as being a group of people who have a feeling of association with each other; perhaps an association of ideas as in a political party, or of feelings when we see football supporters dismissing the claims of rival “tribes”. Feeling part of a tribe brings us together and, with its association of shared history and genetic material, the family “tribe” is arguably the one to which we are always bound physically and emotionally.

In a family business, it is not just about the business. It is also about the family.

All employees and directors are part of the same business tribe, but only some are part of the family tribe. Whether you are a member of only one of those tribes or both makes a lot of difference. As a coach working with clients in family businesses, you are likely to find that much of your work is related to how the client deals with those differing “tribal” relationships.

 

CHAPTER SIX: Family first or business first: issues in family business

ePub

Hande Yasargil and Lloyd Denton

Introduction

In every family business, there are the people at the centre, people at the margins, and others in between. Working as coaches to the leaders of family businesses throughout Turkey and the Middle East over the past decade, we have enjoyed many remarkable relationships and learned some useful perspectives, tools, and processes. This chapter is about sharing what we have learnt so far, opening it to discussion and debate, and, therefore, learning more from the experience of other families and consultants. Of course, the details of any cases and examples provided here are altered to protect the privacy of our clients.

Seen from the edges: a family and a business

Coaches working with the complexities of a family business may have good reason to ask the question: what comes first in a family business, family or business ?

One of the most valuable lessons for us has been the importance of knowing our place at the periphery. Equipped with professional knowledge of business and coaching, and of family systems, we tend to spend our time looking in from the edges, choosing carefully when and how we might intervene to create a positive impact at the centre. In fact, it seems to us that some of the most serious mistakes to be made with family businesses arise from coaches mistakenly believing they are at the centre. In this highly complex environment, distance and humility go a long way towards success. Pity those who believe they have joined the inner circle, who are sure they understand everything that is going on, or who become inflexible and doctrinaire in the methods they use or the solutions they apply.

 

CHAPTER SEVEN: Exploring a coaching approach for expatriate family businesses in an international context Elisabeth Legrain-Frémaux

ePub

Elisabeth Legrain-Frémaux

Introduction

Couples and families living in an expatriate situation have a unique opportunity to explore the potential to start a family business. Creating change in individuals or groups normally requires the creation of a sense of urgency to shift people from compliancy and/or fear. Expatriates referred to in this chapter are executives in a leadership position on international work postings, working across countries and cultures. These personnel are posted overseas, most of the time on a voluntary basis, motivated by job advancement potential, opportunity to travel, and a higher income. Most expatriates only stay in the foreign country for a certain period of time, and plan to return to their home country eventually, although there will be some who choose to stay on and never return to their country of citizenship.

Their world has been turned upside down and inside out, and they have to start building a new family life in a new country, often with a different language and a very different culture.

 

CHAPTER EIGHT: Understanding the impact of family dynamics on the family business coaching approach V. Ramakrishnan

ePub

V. Ramakrishnan

Introduction

Family businesses are one of the major economy sectors in many countries. The sense of ownership drives a natural commitment, an element most “professional” businesses struggle to achieve. The problem with family business is growth. Either “the firm grows faster than the family or the family grows faster than the firm …”—a well-known saying.

Family businesses struggle to differentiate between the business, management, and ownership; the demands of each are different, often conflicting, and difficult to develop a package to deal with. These differences tend to diverge as successive generations move into the business, and often when one member marries into an equally affluent business family, bringing into the business portfolio a possibly different mindset and beliefs.

As with other businesses, family businesses tend to run down over time. Families prefer to play their internal politicking close to their chest as a rule, and there are numerous internal undercurrents that make free and public sharing difficult. Coaching is a powerful technique to help these businesses renew and grow.

 

CHAPTER NINE: Conclusions and future directions

ePub

Manfusa Shams

With increasing competition in the global economy market, a business set up within a family context appears to be the most desirable option for getting optimum levels of achievement in the economic sector around the world. The statistical evidence of 65–80% of all businesses in the world being family business (Nation, 2004), with 80% of family businesses from the USA and Europe (Flintoff, 2002) is in support of this accessible option for economy growth. The present estimate of 75% of all businesses in the UK (Jackson &Shams, 2006) being family businesses is supporting this trend.

Family business has been characterized as a unique economic organization for the pattern of ownership, governance, management, and succession, influencing the organization’s goals, strategies, structure, and the functional strategies designed to transfer succession to the next generation (Chua, Chrisman, &Sharma, 1999).

Family businesses function around families; families, in turn, determine the nature and extent of business. With diverse family systems in different cultures, we must discuss the implications of diverse coaching approaches for family businesses within and beyond a particular cultural context.

 

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