Whistle While You Work: Heeding Your Life's Calling

Views: 891
Ratings: (0)

Everyone wants to live a life that enables them to make the most of their unique gifts, interests, and passions-to find their true calling, the work they were born to do. Whistle While You Work is a liberating guide that uses powerful stories and exercises to help readers find truly satisfying, fulfilling work consistent with their deepest values. The authors combine a thoughtful and practical discussion about calling with examples showing how to apply these ideas to one's life. They mix in dozens of inspiring stories featuring individuals who have found, or are in the process of finding, their calling with straightforward advice and suggestions on how to discover one's calling. Most importantly, they provide readers with a solid path for embracing calling, a subject usually addressed abstractly in a useful, fun, and systematic way. Through a unique Calling Card exercise that features a guided exploration of 52 "natural preferences" -- such as Advancing Ideas, Doing the Numbers, Building Relationships, Performing Events -- the book gives readers a new way to detect and reflect on the core of their life's work. By using this and other tools in the book, readers develop their own answers to three critical questions: What gift do I naturally give to others? What gift do I most enjoy giving to others? What gift have I most often given to others? In answering those questions, they will reveal to themselves their calling-and ultimately move toward new realms of success and fulfillment. Whistle While You Work is an inspiring, effective, and entertaining approach to discovering one's calling. It will equip all of us with the mind-set, stories, coaching, and, perhaps most importantly, the hope we need to find our way ahead-and see a clear picture of what our right work is and what to do with our limited time here on Earth.

List price: $19.95

Your Price: $14.96

You Save: 25%

 

7 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Chapter 1 what do I want to be when I grow up?

ePub

I’m already late for my plane. The alarm in my hotel room didn’t go off—or maybe I slept right through it. I’m stressing hard; if I miss this flight, I’ll be two hours late for my meeting, not to mention deeply embarrassed in front of my clients when I finally do show my face.

Traffic is awful. My taxi driver coughs and shifts in his seat as he faces the long line of cars ahead of him. I see his reflection in the rear-view mirror. He looks like he’s straight from Central Casting’s cab driver department: the big, red, Karl Malden nose, the watery bloodshot eyes, the few greasy strands of hair sticking out from under the flattened wool cap.

“What time’s your flight?” he asks, glancing up at the mirror to meet my gaze.

I tell him—the hopeful, pleading tone of my voice all too apparent.

The driver shakes his head. “You ain’t gonna make it. Sorry. This traffic’s outta control.”

I sigh involuntarily and mumble something about the meeting I’m going to miss.

My driver waxes philosophical. “Everything happens for a reason,” he says. “You wanna know why I’m a cab driver?”

 

Chapter 2 what is my calling card?

ePub

I settle into the taxi, hoping to get a bit of work done before my upcoming meeting. As the driver pulls away from the curb, I open my briefcase and take out a folder. Even as I try to focus on my papers, I can see from the cabbie’s face in the rear-view mirror that he wants to talk.

“So, whattayou in town for?” he asks.

“I’m giving a speech. A presentation to some businesspeople,” I say, hoping to make it sound uninteresting so the driver will leave me alone.

He doesn’t take the hint. “Oh yeah? What’s it about?”

I’m not interested in giving the speech twice, so I offer the Reader’s Digest abridged version. “Hearing and heeding your life’s calling—doing the work you were born to do.”

My cabbie scoffs. “That’s a good one. You gotta section on how to make a million bucks while you sleep, too?”

Now he’s hooked me. “You sound skeptical.”

“Hey look, what am I supposed to say? Your life’s ‘calling?’ C’mon, I drive a cab here. What’s that got to do with a calling?”

I close my folder and catch the driver’s eye in the rear-view. “You weren’t born to drive a taxi?”

 

Chapter 3 gifts—is my job my calling?

ePub

I’m coming back from my longtime friend’s fiftieth birthday party, so I’m feeling no pain as my taxi snakes through the streets back to my hotel. My driver, though, isn’t doing so well. He’s describing to me the difficulties he faces, as a first-generation American, in raising his second-generation teenage son.

“Yesterday, I come back home at 2:00 in the morning and his mother tells me that he hasn’t said his prayers before bed. So what do I do? I have to wake him up and stand over him while he says them.” He looks up and catches my eyes in the rear-view mirror. “And this is not the first time, you know?”

I murmur something about the difficulties of child-rearing, no matter what one’s situation is.

“He is a good boy,” continues my driver. “But he has no appreciation for our traditions.”

“I’m sure all parents, in all ages and places, have had that same complaint,” I say, trying to keep the discussion less personal.

But my driver wants to get into it. “It is not the same as now, though. Now it is more important than ever that the young do not stray.”

 

Chapter 4 passions—what keeps calling me?

ePub

I’ve just finished a delicious African feast at a favorite hole-in-the-wall hideaway in Nairobi, Kenya. My taxi driver, a laughing grandmother, is driving me slowly back to my hotel. Sitting in the cab, my belly full, watching the lights of the city pass by, I listen to her deep, mellifluous voice rising above the sound of the old car’s engine.

She’s telling me about her three grandchildren. They’ve been living with her since her daughter’s husband was killed in an accident. That tragedy is mentioned almost as if in passing; her story focuses instead on the liveliness and energy of the three kids and what a pleasure—and a challenge—it is for her to keep up with them.

I express my condolences at her son-in-law’s death and she nods sagely. Life is full of the unexpected, she says. Every day, she sees it, right here in her cab. To her, the opportunity to meet new people all the time is a source of great wonder; making connections with people, she says, is her undying passion. “What else matters in this world,” she asks, “than people? I never tire of laughing with the happy ones and consoling the sad ones.”

 

Chapter 5 values—where do I get connected?

ePub

My taxi driver looks exhausted. I have to tap on the window three times to get his attention before he opens the door for me. Coming around to take my bags, he shakes his head and squints, clearing cobwebs from his brain. When he slides back into the driver’s seat, I can see in the rear-view mirror how red and watery his eyes are.

“Where to?” he mumbles in a heavy accent made heavier by a thick sleepy tongue.

“Home,” I say, leaning back into the seat, but—somewhat concerned about my driver—not quite relaxing. For one thing, it makes me nervous to see his eyelids droop as I give him directions to my house.

“Ah, home,” says the driver wistfully, as he merges into traffic. “Very nice. I haven’t been to my home in five years.”

Figuring that he’ll be more likely to stay awake if he’s talking, I take the opportunity to engage him in conversation.

“Really? Where’s home?”

“Far away,” he tells me. “Far, far away.”

A few moments pass. I can’t tell if my driver is remembering his country or nodding off. I try to keep the conversational ball rolling.

 

Chapter 6 how do heed the call?

ePub

I’m experiencing the most harrowing taxi ride of my life. My driver has already cut off half a dozen cars on his way out of the airport; now he’s driving down the shoulder of the highway to get around the traffic jam.

“Hey, I’m not really in a hurry,” I say, trying to drop a hint. My driver doesn’t take it. He swings wildly from the shoulder back onto the road and then the passing lane, narrowly missing the back of a pick-up truck.

“Hey. Listen. Please.” I knock on the plastic divider between the our seats. “Could you slow down? This is making me nervous.”

The driver doesn’t even acknowledge me. “Asshole!” he growls at a minivan blocking our way. Then, leaning on the horn, he cuts back across the right lane and onto the shoulder, the car’s wheels spitting gravel behind us.

I fumble for the seatbelt but there isn’t one, so I grab hold of the strap hanging down by the window. My arm is practically wrenched off as my driver swerves onto the exit ramp and into city traffic.

Here, it’s no better. My driver is constantly leaning on his horn and swearing. He punches the gas and jams on the brake; I’m getting whiplash every half a block.

 

Chapter 7 legacy—did I answer the call?

ePub

My taxi driver snakes through traffic effortlessly. He cuts down sidestreets and through alleyways, missing one tie-up after another. At this rate, I’ll be in my hotel room half an hour early and snug in bed that much sooner than I expected. I marvel at my driver’s ability to avoid delays and keep moving forward.

“How long have you been driving?” I ask, appreciating his expertise.

“‘Bout nine hours,” he cracks. “Still got three more hours before I cash out.”

“No, seriously. You’re quite a driver. I was wondering how long it’s taken you to learn all these shortcuts.”

He chuckles and makes a sharp right to avoid a truck unloading down the street. “Ten years. Right after I got laid off from my teaching job.”

“You were a teacher? What grade?”

“Hmmm… 13th through 20th, I guess you’d say. Mostly undergrad, some graduates.” He taps his ID card rubber-banded to the sun visor. “See this? I don’t put the Ph.D. after my name here. But I’m a doctor; professor of sociology for 25 years.”

“No kidding. So how come you’re driving a taxi?”

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
9781609944063
Isbn
9781609944063
File size
0 Bytes
Printing
10 times
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
Yes
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata