Medium 9780874252255

50 Activities for Sales Training

Views: 586
Ratings: (0)

Part of our best-selling 50 Activities series! Comes complete with learning objectives, facilitator guidance, and reproducible materials. Novice and experienced salespeople alike will benefit from these activities that focus on strengthening essential selling skills. The ready-to-use activities offer practice in closing a sale, developing new business, resolving customer objections, managing sales relationships, and more. All of the necessary materials are provided for you to effortlessly implement the activities; they come complete with trainer's notes, feedback instruments, exercises, and simulations.

List price: $149.95

Your Price: $119.96

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
 

50 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

Activity 1: The Listening Test

PDF

 

The Listening Test 

 

 

Objectives 

• To identify factors that help and hinder effective listening 

• To practice listening skills 

 

Method 

1. Explain the rules for the test: 

• No note taking. 

• Don’t yell out answers—write them down. 

• Write the numbers 1 through 12 on a piece of paper. 

• Listen carefully—each question will be read only once. 

2. Read each question slowly and clearly (see test on following pages). 

3. Have participants score their own tests. Read each question again and allow  members of the group to volunteer the answers. If their response is wrong,  give the correct answer. 

4. Ask for a show of hands to determine how the group performed. 

5. Discuss the exercise by asking the following questions: 

• What hindered your ability to listen? 

• What helped your ability to listen? 

• How can we apply on the job what we learned today? 

 

Notes and Variations 

1. This activity can be used as part of a larger workshop on listening either as a  pre‐test or post‐test. 

2. Be sure to link the learning points from the discussion to specific sales  situations. 

 

Activity 2: Give it to me. . .I want it!

PDF

 

Give it to me. . .I want it! 

 

 

Objectives 

Selling is a dynamic process between a buyer and a seller. This exercise is  designed to help participants understand the process from both the seller’s  perspective and the buyer’s perspective. Specifically, the exercise will help  participants: 

• Recognize the basic elements of the selling/buying process 

• Identify how salespeople influence the buying decision 

• Identify how buyers influence the selling process 

 

Method 

1. Distribute Handout 2.1 and review the rules of the exercise. 

2. Explain the seller’s role by stating that his/her goal is to get business (“it”)  from the buyer. However, the only way a seller can get the business is to ask, 

“Give it to me. . .I want it!” The seller can make this demand as often as he/she  likes and with any inflection desired, but those are the only words the seller can  use. 

3. Explain the buyer’s role by stating that his/her goal is to buy what the seller is  selling. If the buyer really feels the seller wants the business (“it”), the buyer  can give it by saying, “Yes, you can have it.” However, if the buyer doesn’t  really feel the seller wants the business, he/she must say, “No, you can’t have  it.” These are the only two statements the buyer is allowed to use. 

 

Activity 3: How good a detective are you?

PDF

 

How good a detective are you? 

 

Objectives 

• To identify the factors that hinder our ability to apply established skills to a 

new task 

• To demonstrate the limitations of observations 

 

Method 

1. Distribute Handout 3.1 face down and tell participants not to look at it until 

they are instructed to do so. 

2. Explain to the group that the handout contains a paragraph and that their 

goal is to count the number of f’s included in the paragraph. Furthermore, the  group may not use pencils or pens to mark the f’s. They have two minutes to  complete the exercise. 

3. Conduct the exercise. 

4. At the end of the two minutes, ask participants to turn their papers over and 

write the number of f’s on the back. 

5. Go around the room and ask each participant how many f’s he/she counted. 

Post the scores on the flip chart. Note: The scores will vary greatly from 15 to  over 30. It is unlikely that more than one or two (if any) have the correct  number. 

6. Tell the group they will repeat the exercise since none (or only a few) got the 

 

Activity 4: The Nickel Auction

PDF

 

The Nickel Auction 

 

 

Objectives 

Win/win negotiations are based on trust and a common goal. This exercise is  specifically designed to: 

• Demonstrate the cost of win/lose negotiations. 

• Identify strategies for initiating win/win negotiations. 

 

Method 

1. You will need six nickels for this exercise. 

2. Tell the group you are going to auction off six nickels and want to see who 

can do the best job of “winning.” You will need three volunteers: two for the  bidding, and one to keep track of how much the two parties pay for each  nickel. 

3. Explain the auction rules as follows: 

• Each nickel will be auctioned off separately. 

• Each party will take turns starting the bidding. 

• The bidding will alternate back and forth until one of the participants 

declines to bid. 

• Minimum bid is a penny and all subsequent bids must be in full penny 

increments. There are no maximum bids. 

4. Conduct the auction:  a) Hold up the first nickel and ask for a bid from one of the bidders.  b) After the initial bid is given, turn to the other bidder and ask for his/her bid.  c) Continue the bidding process until the nickel is “sold.”  d) Then auction the second nickel in the same manner. However, allow the 

 

Activity 5: What does it take to be a world class salesperson?

PDF

 

What does it take to be a  world­class salesperson? 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help participants develop a practical model of a world‐class salesperson 

• To help participants assess themselves against the model and identify their 

strengths and improvement opportunities 

 

Method 

1. Distribute Handout 5.1 and ask participants to describe both the worst and 

best salesperson they have encountered as a consumer. Allow five minutes  for individuals to complete descriptions. 

2. Starting with the Worst Salesperson section, lead a discussion based on the 

group’s responses. You should help participants focus on what the  salesperson did that most influenced their assessment. Also, ask if  participants remember the salesperson’s name. Note: Most participants will  remember the name of the best salesperson, but not the worst. 

3. Lead a brief discussion of what a world‐class salesperson is (e.g., the best of 

the best). Salespeople should use this as a model for assessing their own  capabilities. 

4. Distribute Handout 5.2 and instruct participants to complete Part I 

 

Activity 6: Spot the Misspelled Words

PDF

 

Spot the Misspelled Words 

 

 

Objective 

Written communication sends a specific and powerful message to clients. 

Letters, memos, or proposals with misspelled words leave an unprofessional  impression. This exercise is designed to help participants recognize commonly  misspelled words. 

 

Method 

1. Distribute Handout 6.1 and explain that each of the 10 sentences contain at  least one or more misspelled words. 

2. Participants are given 10 minutes to identify the misspelled words without  consulting a dictionary. 

3. At the end of the time period, distribute the answer sheet, Handout 6.2, and  instruct participants to score themselves. One point is awarded for every  correctly identified misspelled word. One point is deducted for every  correctly spelled word identified as misspelled. 

4. When the group is finished scoring their test, post scores, and discuss the  exercise. 

Notes and Variations 

1. Develop a list of the group’s most commonly misspelled words. 

2. This activity can be used as part of a workshop on written communication. 

 

Activity 7: Punctuation Exercise

PDF

Handout 7.1

 

Punctuation Exercise 

 

Directions 

Punctuate the following sentences. Note: not all sentences require additional  punctuation. 

 

1. My briefcase included client files a calculator my appointment book business  cards pencils pens and a note pad. 

2. During the sales call the client was genial but reserved. 

3. Today more women are in decision‐making positions than ever before. 

4. The salesperson waited for the opportunity to make his presentation, but the  opportunity never came. 

5. To prepare for the sales call the sales manager asked his people to do three  things: (1) have a call objective (2) develop a call plan and (3) have all the  necessary sales materials. 

6. The chance for advancement never materialized therefore he quit. 

7. We thought we had lost the account; consequently, we were happy when they  reordered. 

8. My boss copy of the report was in the office, so she borrowed her secretarys. 

9. Dennis proposal arrived today so Mary called for an appointment. 

10. We wanted to attend the sales managers meeting but were unable to book a  flight that would get us there in time. 

 

Activity 8: The Great American Shootout

PDF

 

The Great American Shootout 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help participants set challenging but realistic goals 

• To help participants develop a plan for achieving their goals by utilizing each 

team’s resources and talents 

 

Method 

1. This exercise is played with teams of four to six participants. Each team will  need a round wastepaper basket, 100 sheets of scrap paper, and a copy of 

Handout 8.1. 

2. Designate a shooting area for each team by putting the basket against a wall  and placing a 10‐inch piece of masking tape on the floor, 10 to 12 feet from  the basket. Make sure each team has an adequate shooting area and that the  tape is placed the same distance from the baskets. 

3. Divide participants into teams of four to six people. 

4. Distribute Handouts 8.1 and 8.2 and review the rules. 

5. Allow 10 minutes for the goal‐setting period. During this time, participants  may practice shooting and experiment with various shooting techniques. 

6. At the end of the goal‐setting period, each team must submit their goals in  writing. Team goals are to remain secret. 

 

Activity 9: Territory Management Style

PDF

 

Territory Management Style 

 

 

Objectives 

• To enable participants to examine their own approach to managing their 

territory 

• To provide feedback on the participant’s territory management style 

• To stimulate a general discussion about territory management style 

 

Method 

1. Ask participants to complete the Territory Management Questionnaire, 

Handout 9.1. 

2. Give a brief explanation of the three territory management styles (see 

Handout 9.2). 

3. Distribute Handout 9.2 and ask participants to predict their territory  management profile. 

4. Draw the profile graph in Handout 9.4 on a flip chart. Ask participants their  predicted score for each style and then record their scores on the flip chart. 

5. Distribute Handout 9.3 and instruct participants to score their territory  management profile. 

6. Distribute Handout 9.4 and have participants plot their actual scores on the 

Profile Graph. Then review the Style Analysis section in Handout 9.4. 

7. Ask participants their actual scores and then plot them on the flip chart next  to their predicted scores. 

 

Activity 10: Behavioral Styles

PDF

 

10 

Behavioral Styles 

 

 

Objectives 

• To enable participants to recognize the behavioral style of others 

• To provide feedback on their behavioral style 

• To stimulate a general discussion about behavioral style 

 

Method 

1. Ask participants to complete the Behavioral Styles Questionnaire, Handout 10.1. 

2. Distribute Handout 10.2 and give a brief explanation of behavioral styles. 

3. Distribute Handout 10.3 and ask participants to predict their behavioral style. 

4. Distribute Handouts 10.4 and 10.5, and explain how participants are to score 

their questionnaire and develop their profile. 

5. When participants have completed scoring and profiling their questionnaires, 

distribute Handout 10.6 and explain how participants can interpret their  scores. 

6. Have participants work in subgroups of two or three to validate their profiles 

by sharing it with others and asking others for feedback. 

7. Lead a discussion based on the Discussion Questions sheet, Handout 10.7. 

 

Notes and Variations 

1. This activity can be used in conjunction with Activity 11—Behavioral Styles 

 

Activity 11: Behavioral Styles Game

PDF

 

11 

Behavioral Styles Game 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help participants recognize characteristics that differentiate the behavioral 

styles 

• To help participants become more comfortable with the behavioral styles 

 

Method 

1. Conduct a brief discussion on the behavioral styles, including: 

• Definitions for openness and directness, Handout 10.2, Activity 10 

• The Behavioral Style Grid, Handout 10.2, Activity 10 

(Note: Do not provide description of specific behavior.) 

2. Divide the group into teams of four to six. 

3. Give each team an envelope containing the 40 Behavioral Clues made from 

Handout 11.1. (Note: Each set of clues should be shuffled before they are  placed in an envelope.) 

4. Give each team a flip chart with the following four headings across the top of  the page:  SOCIALIZER, RELATER, DIRECTOR, THINKER. Also give each  team a roll of masking tape. 

5. Explain that the objective of the activity is to place (using the masking tape)  the behavioral clues under the correct behavioral style. The winning team will  be the one with the most accurate placement of the clues. However, in the  event of a tie, the first team to finish wins. When a team is finished, it must  notify you and you will indicate the order of its finish (e.g., first, second, third,  etc.). Point out that once a team says it is finished, it cannot change any clues. 

 

Activity 12: Adapting Your Behavioral Style

PDF

 

12 

Adapting Your Behavioral Style 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help participants recognize when they are not effective in adapting to a 

customer’s behavioral style 

• To help participants develop sales strategies for improving their relationships 

with difficult customers 

 

Method 

1. Review the four behavioral styles and lead a discussion on how to sell most  effectively to each behavioral style. Distribute Selling People the Way They 

Like To Be Sold, Handout 12.1, to each participant. 

2. Distribute the Difficult Customer Worksheet, Handout 12.2, and instruct  participants to complete it individually. 

3. Have participants work in subgroups of three to discuss Handout 12.2. 

4. After the small‐group discussions, lead a whole‐group discussion based on the 

Discussion Questions, Handout 12.3. 

 

Notes and Variations 

1. Make sure each group has at least two different styles represented. This  provides participants with a good reality test for their discussions. 

2. Assign each group a specific style and have them present their  recommendations for selling to people who have that style. Then compare  their recommendations to those mentioned in Handout 12.1. 

 

Activity 13: Breaking the Code

PDF

 

13 

Breaking the Code 

 

 

 

Objectives 

• To demonstrate how group dynamics impact group problem solving 

• To provide participants with feedback on their style of influencing others 

• To demonstrate how risk, reward, and competition influence group 

performance 

 

Method 

1. Divide participants into teams of five to eight. 

2. Distribute Handout 13.1 to each team. 

3. Explain the rules of the activity: 

• Teams are to discover what letters are behind the two circled squares. 

• Teams can find out what letter is behind any square (except the two 

circled) for $1,000 per square. 

Each team has a budget of $20,000. 

If a team guesses correctly, they receive a $10,000 bonus. 

If a team guesses incorrectly, team members all lose their jobs. 

Each team must select a person to be the designated buyer. This person is  the only person who can purchase squares from the facilitator. 

There is no limit to the number of squares a team may purchase or the  number of times teams may purchase squares. 

When a team feels it has the answer to the code, the team must present its  solution to the facilitator. The facilitator will inform the team if the solution  is correct. 

 

Activity 14: The Sales Presentation Role Play

PDF

 

14 

The Sales Presentation Role Play 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help participants try new sales skills without risk of failure 

• To give participants feedback on the effect of their behavior on others 

• To improve participants’ effectiveness in delivering an effective sales 

presentation 

• To improve participants’ ability to recognize effective and ineffective 

behaviors in themselves and in others 

• To share and refine successful skills techniques 

 

Method 

1. Have participants break into teams of three. 

2. Distribute Handouts 14.1 and 14.2, and review the objectives, guidelines, and  time frame for the activity. Properly position the activity by explaining each  person’s role and by clarifying the group’s expectations for the activity. 

3. Have the teams conduct their role plays. 

4. When the role‐playing period is over, lead a group discussion based on the 

Discussion Questions, Handout 14.5. 

 

Notes and Variations 

1. To assist the participants in giving effective feedback, suggest that they use  the following procedure: 

 

Activity 15: Selling Skills Inventory

PDF

 

15 

Selling Skills Inventory 

 

 

Objectives 

• To provide a structure for assessing selling skills 

• To help salespeople identify their selling skills strengths and improvement 

opportunities 

 

Method 

1. Distribute the Selling Knowledge and Skills Inventory, Handout 15.1, and the 

Selling Skills Inventory Analysis, Handout 15.2. 

2. Have participants individually complete the inventory and Strengths and 

Improvement Opportunities sections of the analysis. Allow about 15 minutes. 

3. Pairs or triads meet to discuss the results. Each participant takes a turn in the 

“hot seat” and describes the results of his/her inventory and analysis. Others  in the group ask questions to clarify the analysis and give feedback. Allow 45  minutes for this process. 

4. The Building on My Strengths and Actions for Improving sections in Handout 

15.2 are completed individually. Allow about 10 minutes. 

 

Notes and Variations 

1. Sales managers may want to complete a copy of the inventory for each  salesperson and use it as a basis for a developmental review. 

 

Activity 16: Neutralizing Objections

PDF

 

16 

Neutralizing Objections 

 

 

Objectives 

• To identify the most common objections 

• To develop strategies for neutralizing (or pre‐answering) objections 

 

Method 

1. Conduct a brief discussion on objections, making the following points: 

• Objections are questions or concerns that must be resolved for people to 

make a buying decision. 

• Some objections are logical and require facts, figures, proof, etc. Other 

objections are emotional and require empathy, understanding, support,  etc. 

• Neutralizing or pre‐answering objections brings common questions and 

concerns to the surface and resolves them in the context of the sales  presentation. 

• Neutralizing requires salespeople to: 

− Identify their buyer’s major objections 

− Understand why buyers have the objections 

− Develop responses that satisfy their customers’ concerns or that answer  their questions about the objection 

− Determine when, in the presentation, to address the objection 

2. Distribute Handout 16.1 and ask participants to identify their most common 

 

Activity 17: Peer Group Review

PDF

 

17 

Peer Group Review 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help salespeople give and receive performance‐based feedback 

• To help participants establish realistic goals and to develop plans for 

achieving them 

• To help salespeople identify the resources they need to achieve their goals 

 

Method 

1. Put participants in peer groups of three or six (e.g., salespeople with similar  experience, accounts, or needs). 

2. Distribute Peer Group Review Planning Guide, Handout 17.1, and Principles of 

Feedback, Handout 17.2. 

3. During the peer group review, have participants make presentations to the  group. The presentation should include the following: 

• Progress on your performance goals (this step is skipped on the initial 

meeting) 

• Establishing and committing to at least one goal for the next week 

• Outlining the actions that are planned to accomplish the goal(s) 

• Describing resources (including people) needed to help accomplish the goal(s) 

4. After each presentation, other group members offer feedback and suggestions  for helping their peers achieve their goals. 

 

Activity 18: Dressing for Success

PDF

 

18 

Dressing for Success 

 

 

Objectives 

• To help salespeople identify what tools are needed to be prepared for every 

sales call 

• To demonstrate the difference between physical sales tools and mental sales 

tools 

 

Method 

1. Divide participants into teams of four to six. 

2. Distribute Dressing for Success, Handout 18.1, and instruct participants to  complete Part I individually. Allow 5 minutes. 

3. When participants have completed Part I, give each team a pad of Post‐its™  and a flip chart sheet with the figure of a salesperson drawn on it. The team’s  task is to develop a comprehensive master list of tools that salespeople need  on every call. Once the list is developed and recorded in Part II of the handout,  team members are to make a Post‐it™ for each item and attach it on the flip  chart at the appropriate place on the figure. Allow 10 minutes. 

4. When all teams have “dressed” their figures, instruct participants to preview  the work done by other teams. Tell them they can borrow or build on any idea  used by other teams. (Participants are to use Part III of Handout 18.1 to list  additional items.) Allow 5 minutes. 

 

Load more


Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000046197
Isbn
9781599965178
File size
1.41 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata