Medium 9781786390455

Managing Quality of Life in Tourism and Hospitality

Views: 22
Ratings: (0)

Quality-of-life research in tourism and hospitality has gained much momentum in the past two decades. This line of research covers three main areas of focus: (i) the impacts of specific tourism and hospitality programmes on the overall quality of life of tourists/guests; (ii) the providers of goods and services; (iii) tourist communities, including the impact of different programmes and events on the quality of life of residents in these communities.ÊFocusing on these key subjects,ÊManaging Quality of Life in Tourism and HospitalityÊprovides a portfolio of selected cases showing best practice and delivering them to the forefront of knowledge application, with examples in tourism and hospitality settings. Best practice case studies are included throughout, providing practical implications and lessons learned. These lessons can be applied by tourism and hospitality practitioners and community leaders, and be used to further research by academics working within tourism and hospitality. The book offers an exciting and refreshing approach to quality-of-life research in tourism and hospitality.

List price: $140.00

Your Price: $112.00

You Save: 20%

Remix
Remove
 

11 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

1 Quality-of-life Research in Tourism and Hospitalit y

PDF

1

Quality-­of-­life Research in

Tourism and Hospitality

Muzaffer Uysal,1* M. Joseph Sirgy2 and Stefan Kruger3

1Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA;

2­ Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA; 3North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Introduction

The enterprise of tourism and hospitality has become a major global force because of its socio-­economic and development implications. The nature of tourism research for both practical and theoretical reasons embodies the interplay of such constructs as sustainability, destination competitiveness and attractiveness, and the quality of life

(QoL) of stakeholders as they are impacted by tourism (Uysal and Modica, 2017).

Both the explicit and implicit assumptions of tourism have always been that tourism, as an industry, provides significant benefits to its stakeholders. The nature of these benefits, tangible and intangible, vary depending on the level of destination life cycle and its infrastructure development. Tourism activities also provide benefits for those who are not necessarily part of the production and consumption system of the tourism and hospitality enterprise in the form of economic benefits (e.g. tax, investment into improved infrastructure, education and health systems) to the host communities.

 

2 Flamenco, Tourists’ Experiences and the Meaningful Lif e

PDF

2

Flamenco, Tourists’ Experiences and the Meaningful Life

Xavier Matteucci*

MODUL University Vienna, Austria

Introduction

This chapter explores tourists’ experiences of flamenco in Spain and seeks to identify the psychological benefits of such experiences for the tourists who engage in them.

Culture and heritage have become a popular rationale for travel. Over the last decades, tourism has emerged as a regular phenomenon, and the demand for new places and distinctive forms of tourism has grown more complex. Places of cultural significance are, therefore, increasingly seeking to attract tourists on the basis of their unique heritage, and by so doing, some regions have become known for a particular type of cultural tourism. This is the case of Andalusia, a southern region of Spain, which is known for its rich and deeply rooted flamenco heritage. Flamenco involves cante (song), baile (dance) and toque (the guitar). The rhythmic punctuation by handclaps and other methods is also an intrinsic feature of the flamenco art. Contrary to popular belief, the song is at the core of flamenco, and from it germinated the dance and instrumental accompaniment. The flamenco song, in its different styles, encompasses the plaintive chant of the Moors, the Jews and reflects the gypsy struggle throughout Spanish history. While flamenco was long considered as the vulgar expression of mysterious outsiders, artists like composer Manuel de Falla (1876–

 

3 ‘To Mix with New People’: The Surprising Day Trips of Mature Germans

PDF

3

‘To Mix with New People’: The

Surprising Day Trips of Mature

Germans

Ondrej Mitas,* Astrid Hohn and Jeroen Nawijn

Breda University of Applied Sciences, Breda, Netherlands

Introduction

Many developed countries are currently witnessing unprecedented demographic ageing. With improvements in health care and urban planning, mature adults are living longer, healthier, and more independent lives, and have thus become a larger and more active proportion of national populations. Many mature adults see no reason why they should not be able to travel in their leisure as far, as often, and as independently as their younger compatriots. Furthermore, partial or full retirement from working makes mature adults important for the tourism industry. After retirement, mature adults have substantially more time to travel. In countries with adequate health and social systems, such as those in Western Europe, mature adults also often retain the health and wealth needed to travel well past retirement. These dimensions of ageing result in the long-­standing, well-­documented effect that mature adults undertake tourism experiences more often, travel further, and spend more while on holiday (Blazey, 1992), while their propensity to travel has been steadily growing for years (Boksberger and Laesser, 2009).

 

4 Creating Moments of Happiness on Day Trips

PDF

4

Creating Moments of Happiness on Day Trips

Esther Peperkamp,1* Ondrej Mitas,1 Hanny Kadijk,2 Jörg Wenzel,2

Enno van der Graaf3 and Diana Korteweg Maris3

1Breda University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands; 2Stenden University of Applied

Sciences, Leeuwarden, Netherlands; 3HZ University of Applied Sciences, Vlissingen,

Netherlands

Introduction

Tourism advertising suggests that tourists’ experiences should be rich with happiness.

While the term happiness has been interpreted in a variety of ways, research over the past 15 years defines happiness as subjective well-­being, a combination of thoughts and feelings that a person holds about their quality of life (e.g. Diener and Seligman,

2002). Tourism experiences are associated with feeling and thinking positively about one’s life. Feelings, especially, become more positive on a tourism experience (e.g.

Nawijn, 2011; Mitas et al., 2012a; Lin et al., 2014; Chen and Li, 2018). These positive feelings are usually defined as positive emotions, which are intense, short-­lived feelings that are experienced as pleasant and desirable.

 

5 Social Tourism as Correlates of Quality of Life: The Case of Disadvan- taged People

PDF

5

Social Tourism as Correlates of Quality of Life: The Case of

Disadvantaged People

Raija Komppula* and Riikka Ilves

Centre for Tourism Studies, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland

Introduction

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the factors that affect the formation of the  social holiday experience, and the meaning of the experience for the holiday taker. Social holiday is defined as a manifestation of social tourism, which in most countries refers to ‘Tourism for all’, referring to activities of governments, local authorities, charities and/or other organizations aiming to support financially the opportunities for disadvantaged people to have a holiday away from home (see e.g.

Minnaert et  al., 2011). Tourism for all is a priority for the International Social

­Tourism Organization (ISTO) and for the social tourism sector generally (ISTO,

2016).

According to Richards (1999), vacations play a triple role in contributing to

 

6 How to Make Someone Feel Welcome Somewhere, and Mean It. L’accueil Might Be the Answer

PDF

6

How to Make Someone Feel

Welcome Somewhere, and Mean

It. L’accueil Might Be the Answer

François de Grandpré,1* Marc LeBlanc2 and Chantal Royer1

1Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), Canada; 2Université de Moncton,

Canada

Introduction

What is the meaning of Accueil? L’accueil in tourism is a voluntary interpersonal act in a particular setting which introduces a stranger into a business, community or territory and makes it easier to access benefits from various utilitarian, recreational and cultural assets in that place during the stay. Even though l’accueil is primarily experienced during the visit, some of its components can be felt before and after.

We will address this definition inspired by Gouirand (2009) later, as it holds the key to understanding accueil, but it seems important to first provide a bit of background.

Accueil is a French word which is difficult to render in English. The words hospitality, hospitableness and welcome fall short in translating the deeper meaning of accueil.

 

7 Sightseeing Tours’ Impact on Well-being and Eudaimo nia

PDF

7

Sightseeing Tours’ Impact on

Well-­being and Eudaimonia

Anita Zátori1* and Meghan Beardsley2

1Radford University, Radford, USA; 2Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA

Introduction

Tourism, as a discipline, has encountered fluid reinterpretation and analysis throughout its existence. Initially, academicians and practitioners assessed tourism’s value from solely an economic perspective. Now, there has been a steady shift of focus to the intrinsic impacts of tourism such as that of the well-­being, or quality of life

(QoL) of tourists and destination hosts (Sirgy and Uysal, 2016). Long-­term satisfaction, happiness and eudaimonia (human flourishment) are attributes that can be used to further explore tourism’s potential impacts on well-­being (Filep and Deery, 2010).

Value is not just how much tourism sells, but how it actually impacts the very person participating in the activity, whether they are the tour provider or the individual participating in said tour.

 

8 Thermal Spas, Well-being and Tourism in Budapest

PDF

8

Thermal Spas, Well-­being and

Tourism in Budapest

Melanie Kay Smith1* and László Puczkó2

1Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Sociology; Budapest Metropolitan

University; 2Resources for Leisure Assets, Budapest, Hungary

Introduction

This chapter examines the role that thermal spas play in the well-­being or quality of life (QoL) of both local residents and tourists. Thermal spas can be defined as those facilities based around hot springs, some of which have healing properties. In many countries and cultures, thermal spas are an integral part of the healthcare system (for example, in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, many Balkan countries and the

Baltic States). Research supports the use of thermal and mineral waters for healing

(balneotherapy), often in combination with physiotherapy and water-­based exercises.

Although not all medical systems accept balneotherapy as a form of medicine, thermal spas are nonetheless popular with many visitors to tourism destinations. This is especially true of some of the historic bath or spa towns of Europe, where a combination of heritage buildings and thermal waters provide unique selling propositions.

 

9 Rural Well-being Tourism in Northern Europe – Providing Opportunities to Enhance Quality of Lif e

PDF

9

Rural Well-­being Tourism in

Northern Europe – Providing

Opportunities to Enhance Quality of Life

Henna Konu* and Juho Pesonen

Centre for Tourism Studies, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland

Introduction

Quality of Life (QoL) is often connected with well-­being (Mathew and Sreejesh,

2017) and well-­being is seen as a subjective element of QoL (Puczkó and Smith,

2012). It is noted that tourism can have an effect on the level of satisfaction with life and tourist experiences may cause changes in QoL at home (Smith and Puczkó,

2009). According to Puczkó and Smith (2012) tourism can contribute to most quality-­of-­life domains, but especially to health, emotional and spiritual well-­being, relationship with family and friends, and work and productivity (see also Eusébio and

Carneiro, 2011). It is stated that vacations contribute to QoL by providing relaxation and mental and physical rest, giving possibility for personal development and the pursuit of social and personal interests, and enhancing status (Richards, 1999). These listed benefits are closely connected to the internal motivations of tourists. Some studies discuss the linkages between travel motivations and QoL domains (Puczkó and Smith, 2012) and examine the influence of travel motivations to the tourists’ perceptions of tourism impacts on QoL domains (Eusébio and Carneiro, 2011).

 

10 The Bet Is On: A Case Study of the Naudé-Potgieter Model of Casino Employees’ Happiness in the Workpla ce

PDF

10

The Bet Is On: A Case Study of the

Naudé-Potgieter Model of Casino

Employees’ Happiness in the

Workplace

Rosa-Anne Naudé-Potgieter* and Stefan Kruger

North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Introduction

When one thinks of casinos, you see lights, camera, action . . . glitz and glamour, winning customers and smiling employees assisting with payouts, dealing cards and ever ready to assist on the gaming floor. Economic times in South Africa are challenging, directly impacting casino revenues and for a casino to remain competitive in these conditions, Roan and Diamond (2003) propose that the key will be a quality of work life (QWL) offered to casino employees. It is a clichéd saying by now that happy employees result in happy customers, but this statement is true, especially in the hospitality industry. Casino employees have a direct impact on casino revenues by way of ensuring customer satisfaction by the service rendered to them (Gu and Siu, 2009;

 

11 Quality-of-life Research in Tourism and Hospitality: Implications and Future Researc h

PDF

11

Quality-­of-­life Research in

Tourism and Hospitality:

Implications and Future Research

Muzaffer Uysal,1* M. Joseph Sirgy2 and Stefan Kruger3

1Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA;

2­Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA; 3North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Introduction

As we argue in our introduction, Chapter 1, there are ample opportunities to generate information on how quality-­of-­life (QoL) research is applied in different tourism and hospitality settings. The scope of such opportunities is huge, as one can imagine

– tourism and hospitality is a multifaceted sector with complex offerings and experience settings. These opportunities translate to best practices and case studies encouraging emulation and replication. The current book attempts to do just that, namely, provide a vehicle to publish best practices and case studies for others to emulate and replicate. The book is inspired by an earlier edited volume Handbook of Tourism and

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Sku
BPP0000295416
Isbn
9781786390462
File size
1.74 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
PDF
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata