Medium 9781626565609

Work Reimagined

Views: 109
Ratings: (0)
DISCOVER WHAT YOU'RE HERE TO DO

It's the end of work as we know it. Career paths look nothing like they did in the days before phones got smart. We work more hours at more jobs for more years than ever before. So it's vital that we know how to find work that allows us to remain true to who we are in the deepest sense, work that connects us to something larger than ourselves—in short, our “calling.” We all have one, and bestselling authors Richard Leider and David Shapiro can help you uncover yours.

Through a unique Calling Card exercise that features a guided exploration of fifty-two “natural preferences” (such as Advancing Ideas, Doing the Numbers, Building Relationships, and Performing Events), Leider and Shapiro give us a new way to uncover our gifts, passions, and values and find work that expresses them. Along the way, they mix in dozens of inspiring true stories about people who have found, or are in the process of finding, their own callings.

Uncovering your calling enables you to experience fulfillment in all aspects and phases of your life. And here's the even better news: you'll never have to work again. When you choose to do what you are called to do, you're always doing what you want to do. Work Reimagined offers an enlightening, effective, and entertaining approach to discovering what you were born to do, no matter your age or stage of life.

List price: $16.95

Your Price: $12.71

You Save: 25%

Remix
Remove

6 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

Chapter 1: Reimagining Work—What Do You Do?

ePub

How soon after you first meet someone do you ask the question? How quickly do others ask you when you first meet: What do you do?

It may be the most common question we ask of others and which others ask of us.

It is certainly one of the most important questions we can ask of ourselves: What do I do? What do I really do? What is my real work?

Recently, Richard was on a plane trip where he sat next to a businessperson who annoyed passengers as they settled in by talking loudly enough on his mobile phone for everyone to hear. As soon as the plane hit cruising altitude, he asked Richard the standard question: “What do you do?”

Hoping to keep the conversation relatively short, Richard answered quickly, “I’m an author,” and turned his attention to his laptop by way of illustration.

“I knew it!” exclaimed the man, “I knew you were somebody! Someday I’d like to write a book myself! That is what I’d like to do!”

At a fundamental level, we all need to feel like “somebody,” to do something that gives our life meaning and purpose, some reason to get up in the morning. Work is central to our well-being; what we spend our time doing each day ultimately determines how fulfilled we are. It is not surprising, therefore, that the quest to find fulfilling work is one of the dominant aspirations of people everywhere, at all ages and phases of life.

 

Chapter 2: Reimagining Calling—Should You Quit Your Day Job?

ePub

When people are introduced to the idea of reimagining work, it is not uncommon for them to respond in something like the following way: “It sounds great in theory, but I think I should be grateful just to have a job. I’m just trying to get by, doing what it takes to make ends meet. I know there is more to life than this, but I can’t see what it is or how to get it. I’m working harder than ever, but somehow, I’m accomplishing less. I’m stressed out and the problem is that all the alternatives—changing my career, starting over, finding something different—seem overwhelming. How can I trade the security of my job for the uncertainty of a fresh start? I feel guilty even thinking about the luxury of meaningful work. My parents would never have complained in this way.”

Does this sound familiar at all?

Few of us really have the “luxury” of having the perfect job—the one that really engages our gifts, where we are only focused on projects we are passionate about, and where the culture is consistent with our deepest values. But even if we do not experience that ideal, we do have the “luxury” of choosing how we experience our work. We have some control—not complete freedom perhaps, but some choice over what parts of our job we focus on and thus, some degree of control over what our work is like.

 

Chapter 3: Reimagining Gifts—How Do You Do It?

ePub

When people meet Richard and find out that he is a life coach, they invariably ask him, “Say, do you have a minute? Could you tell me what to do for the rest of my life?” In response to this inquiry, he has them do what we call “The Napkin Test.” You can try it right now, yourself.

Grab your typical cocktail napkin (or similarly-sized piece of paper.) On it, write down the following simple formula: G + P + V = C, where “G” stands for Gifts, “P” stands for “Passion,” “V” stands for “Values,” and “C” stands for Calling.

Gifts + Passions + Values = Calling. It is really that simple. Uncovering our calling means identifying our gifts, applying them in support of something we are passionate about, in an environment that is consistent with our values. That, in essence, is what reimagining work is all about.

Very few people have always known what they wanted to be. Sure, you hear stories about artists or writers who, upon first picking up paintbrush or pen, never looked back. Picasso, for instance, began drawing seriously at age ten and was already exhibiting in galleries by the time he was thirteen. For most of us, though, the realization of what we were meant to do is quite elusive. Few young people stop to think about what their life’s work is—and even among those who do, rare is the belief that they can make a living at it.

 

Chapter 4: Reimagining Passions—Why Do You Do It?

ePub

To explore the nature of meaningful work, we must confront the big philosophical question: “What is the meaning of life?” In The Meaning of Life, philosopher Hugh S. Moorhead collected statements on life’s meaning from 250 writers and scholars. Novelist James Michener wrote: “The main purpose of life is: 1) to have a job in whose purpose you can believe; 2) to have friends whose immediate purposes you can trust; 3) to have some spot on earth which you can return to as home; and 4) to be at the same time a citizen of the world.”

It is no surprise that Michener lists work first. “We put our love where we have put our labor,” wrote Emerson. “To work is to pray,” said St. Benedict. “Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing,” said Theodore Roosevelt. Love, prayer, a prize—is this how you see work? And if you do not, is it not a shame? Is there not something missing when we spend most of our lives, and certainly the greater part of our waking hours, engaged in something that is not a gesture of love, a prayer, or a prize? Faulkner wrote that one of the saddest things is that the only thing people can do for eight hours a day, day after, day, is work. He observed that we cannot eat or drink or make love for eight hours—and literally, he is right. But when our work sustains us, when it becomes an act of love, then perhaps it is not so sad at all. Perhaps it is something to celebrate. Perhaps eight hours a day is not even long enough to really sustain things.

 

Chapter 5: Reimagining Values—Where Do You Do It?

ePub

My taxi driver looks exhausted. I have to tap on the window three times to get his attention before he opens the door for me. Coming around to take my bags, he shakes his head and squints, clearing cobwebs from his brain. When he slides back into the driver’s seat, I can see in the rearview mirror how red and watery his eyes are.

“Where to?” he mumbles in a heavy accent made heavier by a thick sleepy tongue.

“Home,” I say, leaning back into the seat, but—somewhat concerned about my driver—not quite relaxing. For one thing, it makes me nervous to see his eyelids droop as I give him directions to my house.

“Ah, home,” says the driver, wistfully as he merges into traffic. “Very nice. I haven’t been to my home in five years.”

Figuring that he’ll be more likely to stay awake if he’s talking, I take the opportunity to engage him in conversation.

“Really? Where’s home?”

“Far away,” he tells me, “Far, far away.”

 

Chapter 6: Reimagining Legacy—Have You Played Your Music?

ePub

“Did I live a good life?” “Did my life matter?” “Did I play my music?”

The answers to questions like these reveal our legacy—our “leave behind,”—our footprint, the music that plays after we are gone. When we explore our legacy we ask “what do we want our lives to have been about?”

When older adults look back upon their lives, they consistently express a hope that their existence has made a difference. Most do not fear dying nearly as much they do the prospect of having lived a meaningless life. We want to have made some “small dent” in the world. The prospect that no one will remember us after we are gone or worse, that no one will even notice, is deeply unsettling.

Our legacy emerges from a life that is lived in a manner consistent with our calling. When we have given our gifts away in service to something we are passionate about in an environment that supports our values, we leave a legacy that is meaningful and makes a positive difference to our loved ones and us.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000057320
Isbn
9781626565609
File size
2.54 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata