Medium 9781626567429

Mobilized

Views: 22
Ratings: (0)
Mobile has now become such an integral part of how we live that, for many people, losing a cell phone is like losing a limb. Everybody knows mobile is the future, and every business wants in, but what are the elements of mobile success?

SC Moatti, a Silicon Valley veteran who was an executive with Facebook, Trulia, and Nokia, gives businesses and professionals simple ways to thrive in this modern day “gold rush.” More than a book on technology, this is a book about human nature and what matters most to us.

Moatti shows that because mobile products have become extensions of ourselves, we expect from them what we wish for ourselves: an attractive body, a meaningful life, and a growing repertoire of skills. She has created an all-encompassing formula that makes it easy for any business to develop a strategy for creating winning mobile products.

Her Body Rule dictates that mobile products must appeal to our sense of beauty—but beauty in a mobile world is both similar to and different from what it means offline. The Spirit Rule says mobile products must help us address our deepest personal needs. And the Mind Rule explains that businesses that want to succeed in mobile need to continually analyze the user experience so they can improve every iteration of their products.

Moatti includes case studies from mobile pioneers such as Facebook, Uber, Tinder, WhatsApp, and more. The market is full of how-to books for programming apps, but no works examine what is required for success in the mobile era. Until now.

List price: $24.95

Your Price: $18.71

You Save: 25%

Remix
Remove
 

5 Chapters

Format Buy Remix

One The New Gold Rush

ePub

TL;DR Too Long; Didn’t Read

People spend more time on their mobile products than on their computers, so businesses are adjusting their strategy to focus more on mobile.

In addition, entrepreneurs are creating new types of businesses: the sharing economy.

This shift is much bigger than technology or marketing; it’s about company culture.

What guides the success of all mobile products—past, present, and future—is the Mobile Formula. It has three rules: the Body Rule, the Spirit Rule, and the Mind Rule.

Imagine for a moment that your phone bill is as high as your rent or mortgage. Would you be able to afford it? Would you cancel your smartphone plan? Would you move to a smaller and cheaper home so you could continue to pay for your phone?

In 2015, the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) published the results of a global survey showing that an average person puts an implied value of up to $6,000 on their smartphone, or more accurately on the apps that run on smartphones.8 In developing countries like China and India, this represents 40 percent of average income.

 

Two The Body Rule: The Best Mobile Products Operate by Beauty

ePub

TL;DR

To be successful, mobile products must be beautiful. Beauty in mobile comes from efficiency and “wow.”

Efficiency: Nothing on mobile is wasted. Mobile designers make sure their products pass the thumb test.

Wow: Beautiful mobile products trigger strong emotions. Mobile designers make sure their products pass the mom test.

Mobile products need to work anywhere, so mobile designers need to carefully consider all the environments in which they’ll be used. The products need to work like extensions of our bodies.

Mobile designers rely on two types of design elements to build beautiful products: focusing and expanding.

Case studies discussed in this chapter: Airbnb, Amazon Echo, Clara, Flipboard, Instagram, iPhone, KnockKnock, Pandora, Slack, and TrafficAlert.

Centuries ago, in medieval China, an emperor decided he wanted the most beautiful painting of a dragon ever made, so he commissioned it to be painted by a famed artist. The artist retired to a cave in a forest and started sketching.

 

Three The Spirit Rule: The Best Mobile Products Give Us Meaning

ePub

TL;DR

Mobile products are the ultimate personal products. They are with us always and understand what matters to us. Meaning from mobile comes through personalization and community.

Personalization: Mobile products make us feel taken care of. They personalize everything to our mood and context.

Community: Mobile products establish social norms and rituals that make us feel like we belong.

Mobile products are companions that need to be aware of our context—what’s happening outside and how we feel inside. They work like an extension of our spirit.

Mobile companies use two types of filters to build products for meaning: internal and external.

Case studies discussed in this chapter: Facebook, Google Glass, Siri, Tinder, Trulia, and Yelp.

Theo, a depressed writer living alone in Los Angeles, is going through a painful divorce. 48 As a way of coping with his feelings of isolation, he buys an AI assistant, similar to the iPhone’s talking app, Siri. The artificial assistant’s name: Samantha.

 

Four The Mind Rule: The Best Mobile Products Learn as We Use Them

ePub

TL;DR

To be successful, mobile products must adapt constantly. They do it fast, and slow.

Fast: Mobile companies relentlessly learn from their users and adapt to their rapidly evolving needs. Adapting is a matter of survival.

Slow: Mobile companies must reinvent themselves as they break new ground. They have no choice.

By constantly analyzing and optimizing information, mobile products work like an extension of our mind.

Mobile companies use two types of tools to learn from their users and get better at what they do: scientific and artistic.

Case studies discussed in this chapter: Facebook, Lyft, Nokia, WhatsApp, Viber, and Yelp.

On my first day working at Facebook, I got a booklet titled, “Facebook was not originally created to be a company.”

That sounded almost like a question. What, then, was it created to be? The answer was on the overleaf: “It was built to accomplish a social mission—to make the world more open and connected.”

 

Five The Mobile Formula In the Past, Present, and Future

ePub

TL;DR

The mobile revolution started over 140 years ago, but it only really took off with Facebook.

While mobile devices look cool, what people really value are the apps.

Millennials are the architects behind the mobile revolution.

Case studies discussed in this chapter: City of Montreal, Geminoids, Ginger.io, Nokia, Periscope, and Oculus Rift.

When Steve Jobs announced the iPhone on stage in 2007, no one at Nokia really paid attention. It didn’t feel like a threat to the company. According to Nokia engineers, the technology used to create the iPhone touch screen wasn’t viable.

To understand why Nokia dismissed that technology, you need to remember that the company is based in Scandinavia. Winters are very harsh and people are bundled up. They wear thick gloves and don’t want to take them off to use their phones. So Nokia’s resistive touch screens relied on pressure being applied to the screen, so they could be operated with gloves on.76 In contrast, the iPhone capacitive touch screens relied on contact with the skin on users’ fingertips, so they could only be touched with a bare finger.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Chapters

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000077716
Isbn
9781626567429
File size
2.66 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata