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Tourism Management in Warm-water Island Destinations. CABI Series in Tourism Management Research

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Warm-water islands are a cohesive group of islands distinguished by their geography and remoteness, history as former colonial territories, and dependence on external stakeholders for their economic and social development. Warm-water island destinations also have a year-round tourism industry. These island tourism destinations are facing unprecedented adjustment challenges in the wake of increasing globalization and susceptibility to external shocks, and are in search of appropriate policy responses to that globalization. It is critical for small islands to understand how these challenges affect tourism performance and how they impact their residents.Ì_Tourism Management in Warm-water Island DestinationsÌ_unearths the critical aspects that contribute to tourism development and growth in islands. Particular emphasis is placed on destinations such as the Caribbean, with lessons learned that are applicable to other island tourism contexts in the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and the Pacific.Ì_This book provides a platform for emerging systemic perspectives of the various aspects of island tourism, with the view that strategies for the management and development of tourism in island environments can be improved and will be of interest to those studying and researching within destination management.

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1 Overview of Tourism in Warm-water Island Destinations

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1

Overview of Tourism in

Warm-water Island Destinations

Michelle McLeod1* and Robertico Croes2

The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica; 2University of Central Florida,

Florida, United States of America

1

1.1  Background and Rationale

Island tourism is a unique form of tourism that requires exemplification. An island is a piece of land surrounded by a body of water. The physical dimensions are varied and these landforms may occur as archipelagos with several islands, atolls, islets and general masses occurring within close range and islands being included based on their appearance during high and low tides. Island formations originate from tectonic activities involving the Earth’s crust and these activities provide islands with certain geographical features, such as the Pitons or volcanic plugs in St. Lucia. Island tourism denotes tourism activities within these island environments.

As tourism continues to be a dominant global activity for economic gain and employment, there is a need to understand how the business of tourism affects island environments. Principally, islands are physically resource-constrained with small physical spaces and population sizes. If one was to categorize islands, this would mainly be based on size, with small islands being identified not just by the physical landscape, but more so by having a population of less than 1.5 million (Croes,

 

PART I: Island Tourism Transport and Hospitality

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PART I: I� sland Tourism Transport and

Hospitality

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Island Travel Transportation

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace*

Bedford Baker Group, The Bahamas

‘We are like islands in the sea, separate on the surface but connected in the deep.’

William James

2.1 Background

Every island is surrounded by a moat. In times of war, it is a wonderful natural

­defensive barrier. For islands dependent on tourism for economic development the corollary is also true. Islands are difficult to supply with goods, services and visitors, and with the increasing width of the moat comes increasing difficulties with supply.

The width of the moat matters because if every island were close to another, or to a large mainland, bridges would be built across the divide to facilitate access. With the increasing width of the moat, ferry vessels, then larger ships and aircraft, are soon required for passenger transportation and supplies. It is self-evident that bridges facilitate commerce. It is self-evident that moated castles need drawbridges in order to receive supplies. It is self-evident that inexpensive meals and shows facilitate the attraction of patrons to casino floors. It is becoming increasingly self-evident that for tourism-dependent islands, airlines are merely air bridges to facilitate the commerce of tourism. All of these difficulties are solvable but they all make managing island tourism a special case requiring special considerations.

 

PART II: Island Tourism Policy, Planning and Development

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PART II: �Island Tourism Policy, Planning and Development

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� Comparative Analysis

A of Tourism Policy Networks

Michelle McLeod,1* Donna Chambers2 and David Airey3

The University of the West Indies, Jamaica; 2University of Sunderland, United

Kingdom; 3University of Surrey, United Kingdom

1

6.1 Introduction

Policy making in tourism is the process of formulating tourism policies that will guide tourism growth and development. The policy making process is often viewed as a consultative one that engages a number of stakeholders and can thus be perceived as a policy network (Dredge, 2006; Pforr, 2006). An output of the policy making process is tourism policy content that forms part of public policy that Hall and Jenkins

(2004) describe as involving government action as a political activity. Tourism policy content is defined as regulations, guidelines, directives, objectives and strategies to affect tourism development (Ritchie and Crouch, 2003). Based on policy guidelines derived from consultative processes with stakeholders, mandates are given to certain implementation agencies to fulfil the intentions of tourism policy.

 

PART III: Island Tourism Marketing and Management

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PART III: �Island Tourism Marketing and Management

9

� ourism in the Seychelles: Trends

T and Experiences

Neelu Seetaram1* and Brigitte Joubert2

Bournemouth University, United Kingdom; 2Seychelles Tourism Academy, Seychelles

1

9.1 Introduction

Research suggests that the most successful destinations are the ones that can identify and adapt to changes in the tourism industry; particularly to the interests and perception of tourists across varying demographics (WEF, 2015). This is why markets research and studies on consumer behaviour in tourism are among the most prominent areas of tourism research. Such studies are facilitated by the recent development of the Web 2.0, which has enabled online communications among consumers and producers. It has led to increasing consumer reliance on travel reviews in the planning stage of their trips (Buhalis and Law, 2008) as personal recommendations from a wide number of travellers with first-hand experience of the product or destination is preferred in order to reap benefits and obtain the highest level of consumer satisfaction through a more rewarding experience (Filieri and McLeay, 2014).

 

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