Above the Ground and Beneath the Clouds: Schizophrenia in Lacanian Psychoanalysis

Views: 78
Ratings: (0)

Above the Ground and Beneath the Clouds examines the history, conceptualisation, and treatment of the psychotic sub-type of schizophrenia, as this is advocated by psychoanalysis of Lacanian orientation, which is contrasted to modern psychiatry. The book's main focus is the status of the schizophrenic body and language. The ways in which these concepts can be of theoretical and clinical use in contemporary clinical settings are examined throughout.The book consists of three parts. The first part comprises the theoretical investigation of schizophrenia in early 20th century psychiatry and in the theory and teaching of Freud, Lacan, and other influential psychoanalysts. The second part presents the fascinating case of the late 19th century Greek writer Georgios Vizyenos, who invented an extraordinary way to anchor the body before his admission to a psychiatric institution in 1896. The third part discusses the implications of those findings for the contemporary psychoanalytic diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia.Assisted by examples from the author's clinical experience and from literature and art, this book sheds invaluable light on probably the most obscure sub-type of psychosis. It will be of help to academics, clinicians, trainees, and anyone who is interested in the way contemporary psychoanalysis approaches the persistently challenging subject of madness.

List price: $28.99

Your Price: $23.19

You Save: 20%

 

3 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Part I - The “Poor Relation's” Story: Schizophrenia in Freud and Lacan

ePub

PART I

THE “POOR RELATION'S” STORY: SCHIZOPHRENIA IN FREUD AND LACAN

In 1908, a prominent Swiss psychiatrist named Eugen Bleuler gave a speech to an association of German psychiatrists. In that speech, he suggested the replacement of the designation “dementia praecox” with a term of his own invention: “schizophrenia”. Dementia praecox had been an earlier psychiatric term that described the same “mental disease”. Three years later, in 1911, Bleuler published an influential monograph that introduced the term formally to the psychiatric domain.

Psychoanalysis, a psychological theory and therapeutic technique that had already been developing for a few years, soon caught up with psychiatry. It was also in 1911 that its founder, Sigmund Freud, published one of his five famous case studies: “President Schreber”. Freud had been discussing schizophrenia with one of Bleuler's hospital subordinates, Carl Gustav Jung, since Bleuler first suggested it. In his study of 1911, Freud analysed the new-fangled concept in light of a dysfunction in the establishment of narcissism, which, in contrast, happens in paranoia, which was the paper's original focus. In another paper, published four years later, he would refer to a therapeutic orientation for schizophrenia different from the one he had suggested in his study of paranoia. Yet somehow both views relate to what Lacanian psychoanalysis places at the centre of the schizophrenic being: the challenge to relate to one's body and organs through language. Freud's thinking is examined below, following the history of the psychiatric configuration of schizophrenia.

 

Part II - The Beautifying Rise and the Disastrous Fall of the Child's Body in Georgios Vizyenos

ePub

PART II

THE BEAUTIFYING RISE AND THE DISASTROUS FALL OF THE CHILD'S BODY IN GEORGIOS VIZYENOS

In the evening of April 15th, 1896, citizens of Athens and international guests attended the closing ceremony of the first modern Olympic Games. In the following day's newspapers, next to euphoric articles on the revival of an ancient Greek tradition, there was a distressing announcement: the poet and professor Georgios Vizyenos, admitted to a psychiatric hospital four years earlier, had passed away the same night.

Not many were surprised by the writer's death. For the past four years, newspapers had been reporting on his deteriorating condition following a dramatic admission accompanied by psychotic symptomatology: megalomaniac and erotomaniac delusions, intense physical excitation channelled to incomprehensible speech and writing, and two suicide attempts. Those symptoms had appeared in the writer's early forties, following a dramatic vacillation of the consistency of the body image.

 

Part III - After a Hundred Years: The Contemporary Lacanian Clinic of Schizophrenia

ePub

PART III

AFTER A HUNDRED YEARS: THE CONTEMPORARY LACANIAN CLINIC OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

It has now been more than a century since Bleuler transformed Kraepelin's dementia praecox (1899) into schizophrenia (1911). The vocabulary of mental disorders has undergone many more changes ever since.

During the twentieth century, once-prevalent psychiatric terms were abandoned or replaced (e.g., conversion disorder in place of hysteria), whereas new clinical concepts appeared due to social, historical, and scientific changes (e.g., gender dysphoria, PTSD, and stimulant-related disorder) (APA, 2013). Yet it is not only names that have changed but the symptoms that we encounter too (Verhaeghe, 2015).

The concept of schizophrenia underwent significant changes in the past century as well and suffered severe criticism (Arieti, 1974; Laing, 1990; Szasz, 1976). However, this signifier is still widely used in the twentieth century by psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists who wish to treat people diagnosed as schizophrenics.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
9781781817254
Isbn
9781781817254
File size
0 Bytes
Printing
Disabled
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
No
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata