Lonely Planet Wales

Views: 5
Ratings: (0)

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher

Lonely Planet Wales is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Walk the Wales Coast Path, explore Conwy Castle, or take a trip on the Welsh Highland Railway; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Wales and begin your journey now!

Inside Lonely Planet's Wales Travel Guide:

  • Full-colour maps and images throughout
  • Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests
  • Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots
  • Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices
  • Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss
  • Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - cuisine, outdoor activities, landscapes.
  • Over 40 colour maps
  • Covers Cardiff, Brecon Beacons, Swansea, the Gower, Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire, Aberystwyth, Snowdonia, Angelsey and more

eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones)

  • Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges
  • Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews
  • Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience
  • Seamlessly flip between pages
  • Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash
  • Embedded links to recommendations' websites
  • Zoom-in maps and images
  • Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing

The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Wales, our most comprehensive guide to Wales, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled.

Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet's Great Britain guide.

About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.

List price: $24.99

Your Price: $17.49

You Save: 30%

 

8 Slices

Format Buy Remix

Cardiff

ePub

Pop 346,000

The capital of Wales since only 1955, Cardiff has embraced the role with vigour, emerging in the new millennium as one of Britain’s leading urban centres. Caught between an ancient fort and an ultramodern waterfront, compact Cardiff seems to have surprised even itself with how interesting it has become.

The city has entered the 21st century pumped up on steroids, flexing its recently acquired architectural muscles as if it’s still astonished to have them. This newfound confidence is infectious, and these days it's not just the rugby that draws crowds into the city. Come the weekend, a buzz reverberates through the streets as swarms of shoppers hit the Hayes, followed by waves of revellers descending on the capital's thriving pubs, bars and live-music venues.

Cardiff makes an excellent base for day trips to the surrounding valleys and coast, where you'll find castles, beaches, interesting industrial sites and ancient monuments.

AJanuary and February are the coldest months, although Wales’ home matches in the Six Nations Rugby Championship warm spirits in February and March.

 

Brecon Beacons & Southeast Wales

ePub

Wales' southeast corner, where the misty River Wye meanders along the border with England, is the birthplace of British tourism. For over 200 years travellers have visited this tranquil waterway and its winding, wooded vale, where the romantic ruins of Tintern Abbey have inspired poets and artists such as Wordsworth and Turner.

But there's more to the region than the market towns and rural byways of the Lower Wye. To the west, the dramatically serried South Wales valleys tell the story of the Industrial Revolution through heritage sites and still close-knit communities. Move north and the landscape opens out to the magnificent upland scenery of Brecon Beacons National Park, where high mountain roads dip down to remote hamlets and whitewashed ancient churches. The hiking and mountain-biking terrain here is superb.

AOutdoor types should consider heading to Brecon Beacons National Park in late spring, early summer or early autumn to take advantage of what should be reasonable weather (though there's no guarantee). The narrow country roads may be impassable in winter, and become congested during school summer holidays (mid-July to August). Many hostels and campgrounds don't open till after Easter.

 

Swansea, Gower & Carmarthenshire

ePub

A smorgasbord of experiences is on offer in this corner of Wales, with physical proximity being the only thing linking its three main dishes, each with its own distinct flavour. Try a taste of each or gorge yourself on whatever you think sounds yummiest.

Swansea delivers something approaching big-city sophistication, with a glorious stretch of sand arcing between a slowly regenerating city centre and its beach suburb, attractive little Mumbles. On its doorstep are the craggy coastline and epic sandy beaches of the Gower Peninsula, which offer surfing, watersports of all sorts and undulating hikes. Inland, the fecund heartland of rural Carmarthenshire is little touristed but a treat for the green-fingered traveller, with nationally significant parks and gardens scattered about.

If that's whetted your appetite, this area's regional specialities are some of the most famous in all of Wales: salt-marsh lamb, Penclawdd cockles, laver bread and Carmarthen ham. Tuck in.

ABeach lovers might want to brave July and August on the Gower to make the most of the best weather, though be aware that the narrow country roads – and the B&Bs and campgrounds – are likely to be crammed during this time.

 

St Davids & Pembrokeshire

ePub

The Pembrokeshire coast is what you imagine the world would look like if God were a geology teacher. There are knobbly hills of volcanic rock, long thin inlets scoured by glaciers, and stratified limestone pushed up vertically and then eroded into arches, blowholes and sea stacks. All along the shoreline towering red and grey cliffs play leapfrog with perfect sandy beaches.

This wild and incredibly beautiful landscape is the county's greatest asset and in summer people flock here from all over Britain to enjoy the spectacular walking, surfing, coasteering and sea kayaking, as well as the glorious beaches and abundant marine life.

On top of its natural assets, Pembrokeshire offers a wealth of Celtic and pre-Celtic sites, forbidding castles, fascinating islands and little St Davids – the magical mini-city with its chilled vibe, spectacular cathedral and abiding association with Wales' patron saint.

AA good time to be in St Davids is 1 March, when the whole country celebrates their patron saint.

 

Aberystwyth & Mid-Wales

ePub

Bordered by the dramatic landscapes of two national parks, Mid-Wales is often overlooked. Yet this region of plunging coastline, wooded river valleys and small market towns is something of a well-kept secret. As devotees of the bilingual detective series Hinterland (or Y Gwyll, filmed throughout the region) know, this is Wales at its most rural, a sweep of undulating hills that the Industrial Revolution bypassed. Criss-crossed with country lanes and dedicated cycling and walking routes, it's an excellent area to explore under your own steam.

Apart from exuberant, student-populated Aberystwyth, you won't find much excitement in the urban areas, but in any case, it's the places in between, and the people who live in them, that are far more interesting. From struggling farmers to pioneers of sustainable development and the weird and wacky minds of Britain's smallest town, the region reveals more about the Welsh than you may ever have imagined.

ALong days and the promise of fine weather make June to September the best time to tackle long-distance walking routes such as Offa's Dyke Path, while the wonderful foliage colours make autumn perfect for walking or cycling the wooded trails around the Elan Valley.

 

Snowdownia & the Llyn

ePub

This part of Wales really packs it in, from rugged mountain trails to coastal paths, old industrial sites and heritage train lines. The gem in this diadem is Snowdonia National Park, where the mightiest peaks south of Scotland scrape glowering skies. With such a formid­able mountain shield, it's little wonder that the northwestern county of Gwynedd has held tightly to Cymraeg language and culture. More than 65% speak the ancient mother tongue here – the highest proportion in the country.

Along with the mountains there's the sea – battering the rocks at Braich-y-Pwll, producing surfer-friendly swells at Porth Neigwl and cooling the bathers at Barmouth. And all those bracing sea breezes seem to have blown much of the stuffiness or British reserve from the local populace. In many ways, this slice of the country distils the very essence of Welshness – just don't mention that to the folks in Cardiff!

AApril to July are the driest months, while July and August are the warmest. The best months to hit the mountains are June and July for their combination of higher temperatures and lower wind and rain.

 

Anglesey & the North Coast

ePub

This compact region can be boiled down to two essential things: castles and coast. Yes, there are look-at-me castles all over Wales, but few attract more admiring stares than the glamorous trio of Caernarfon, Conwy and Beaumaris, which is why they're recognised as World Heritage Sites today. As for the coast, there's a reason that Llandudno has been crowned 'the Queen of Welsh Resorts'. Its genteel appeal stands in stark contrast to the altogether more wild edges of the Isle of Anglesey, where the echoes of the ancients can be heard in the waves that batter South Stack and the breezes that eddy around clifftop barrows.

Beyond the sands and stones, this part of Wales offers rich opportunity for surfing, sailing, windsurfing, kayaking, kitesurfing, powerboating, paddleboarding, walking and birdwatching. You certainly won't be bored.

AMay is both the sunniest and the driest month, and Llandudno celebrates the warming weather with much Victorian merriment. Walkers will find it a good time to hit the coastal paths.

 

Directory AZ

ePub

For more accommodation reviews by Lonely Planet authors, check out http://lonelyplanet.com/hotels/. You’ll find independent reviews, as well as recommendations on the best places to stay. Best of all, you can book online.

Wales has been attracting tourists in the modern sense for 350 years, so it's fair to say that the country is well prepared for visitors. Visit Wales (www.visitwales.com), the national tourist board, operates a grading system based on facilities and quality of service. Participating establishments usually display their star rating (from one to five), although some excellent places don't join the scheme as it costs to do so. Tourist offices rarely mention good nonparticipating places or may simply dismiss them as 'not approved'. In practice there's variability within each classification, and a one-star guesthouse might be better than the three-star hotel around the block.

Bed-and-breakfast (B&B) accommodation in private homes is plentiful and is often the only option in smaller towns and villages. Some of the finest and most family-friendly B&Bs are in rural farmhouses (used to the muddy boots and large appetites of walkers, cyclists and climbers). Guesthouses, which are often just large converted houses with half a dozen rooms, are an extension of the B&B idea. In general they're less personal and more like small hotels, but without the same level of service.

 

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Slices

Format name
ePub (DRM)
Encrypted
true
Sku
9781787010253
Isbn
9781787010253
File size
9 KB
Printing
Disabled
Copying
Disabled
Read aloud
No
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata