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Cruise Ship Tourism, 2nd Edition

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Completely updated and revised,Ì_Cruise Ship Tourism, 2nd EditionÌ_covers the economic, social and environmental impacts of cruising, combining the latest knowledge and research to provide a comprehensive account of the subject. Despite the industry growing rapidly, there is a substantial gap in the related literature, and this book addresses the key issues for researchers, students and industry professionals. A valuable 'one-stop-shop' for those interested in cruise ships and maritime tourism, this new edition from major names in the field is also an invaluable resource for anyone concerned more widely with tourism and business development.

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Part 1: Fundamental Principles

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Part 1  Fundamental Principles

Chapter 1 introduced the cruise tourism industry by covering a range of topics including its worldwide growth, challenges, people, destinations and impacts. It concluded with an overview of the planning and management required for sustainable cruising. This section of the book, Part 1, includes some of the fundamental principles of the cruise industry. It comprises eight chapters.

In Chapter 2, Michael Clancy (USA) examines the power and profits in the global cruise industry. In Chapter 3, Ross Klein (Canada) describes how the large cruise corporations pay relatively little tax in the USA, yet still manage to be a major lobby group. In Chapter 4 William Terry (USA) investigates the issues of ‘flags of convenience’ and the global cruise labour market. Chapter 5, written by Xavier Font (UK) with Mireia Guix Navarrete and Maria Jesús Bonilla (Spain), examines corporate social responsibility in the cruise sector. In Chapter 6, Ross Klein (Canada) combines with Michael Lück and Jill Poulston (New Zealand) to outline some of the risks of cruising, focusing on passengers’ health, wellbeing and liability. In Chapter 7 Michael P.

 

Part 2: The Cruise Experience: People and Passengers

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Part 2 �The Cruise Experience: People and Passengers

Part 1 introduced the fundamentals of the cruise industry examining its power and profits, role as a lobby group, flags of convenience and its labour market, corporate social responsibility, risk and economics. It concluded with an overview of academic research and professional practice in cruise tourism.

This section of the book, Part 2, introduces the people in the industry and the cruise experience. It comprises five chapters. In Chapter 10, Philip Gibson (UK) investigates talent management in the context of all cruise ship employment. In Chapter 11,

Maree Thyne and James Henry (New Zealand) outline how Port Chalmers, New Zealand is catering for crew needs. Chapter 12, ‘Mediating the Cruise Experience’, by Jo-Anne

Lester (UK), examines some of the cultural conventions of traditional cruising. In

Chapter 13, Júlio Mendes and Manuela Guerreiro (Portugal) conceptualize the cruise passenger experience in the context of the emerging ‘experience economy’. Chapter

 

Part 3: Markets, Marketing and Motivations

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Part 3 �Markets, Marketing and

Motivations

Part 2 introduced the people in the industry and the cruise experience. This third part of the book now canvasses the realms of the cruise industry markets, marketing and passengers’ motivations to cruise. It comprises seven chapters. In Chapter 16, Arja

Lemmetyinen (Finland) outlines the attributes of a strong cruise brand. Chapter 17 by

Gabriella Polizzi and Antonino Mario Oliveri (Italy) focuses on the image of cruise ship holidays on Italian television. In Chapter 18, Sheree-Ann Adams (Grenada) and

Xavier Font (UK) describe the purchasing attributes for cruise passengers. In Chapter 19, the motivations and constraints of cruising for the US and Chinese markets is examined by James Petrick and Suiwen (Sharon) Zou (USA) and Kam Hung (Hong Kong,

China). In Chapter 20, Claire Lambert and Ross Dowling (Australia) describe the rapidly growing cruise markets of children and families. In Chapter 21, Clare Weeden and Nigel Jarvis (UK) describe the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cruise market. In the final chapter (22), Ioannis Pantelidis (UK) examines the use of social media in cruise marketing.

 

Part 4: Impacts of Cruise Ship Tourism: Stakeholders, Politics and Power

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Part 4 �Impacts of Cruise Ship

Tourism: Stakeholders,

Politics and Power

Part 3 introduced cruise industry markets, marketing and passenger’s motivations to cruise. Part 4 outlines the impacts of cruise ship tourism – its stakeholders, politics and power. It comprises five chapters. In Chapter 23, Abel Duarte Alonso (UK) and Nevil

Alexander (Australia) focus on a case study of La Palma Island, Spain, to examine stakeholders’ perceived benefits and obstacles in relation to cruise ship tourism development. In Chapter 24, Eloise Botelho, Carla Fraga and Rodrigo Vilani (Brazil) examine cruise ships and protected areas in Brazil. In Chapter 25, Michael Shone,

Jude Wilson, David Simmons and Emma Stewart (New Zealand) investigate the community impacts of cruise tourism growth in the small South Island, New Zealand town of Akaroa. A related study in the small Pacific Island nation of Vanuatu is presented by Joseph Cheer (Australia) in Chapter 26. In the final chapter in this section

 

Part 5: Planning and Management for Sustainable Cruising

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Part 5 �Planning and Management for

Sustainable Cruising

Part 4 introduced the impacts of cruise ship tourism, its stakeholders, politics and power, through a series of case studies from Brazil in South America, Italy and Spain in

Europe, and New Zealand and Vanuatu in the South Pacific. Now Part 5 briefly examines the planning and management aspects of sustainable cruising in three chapters.

In Chapter 28, C. Michael Hall, Hannah Wood and Sandra Wilson (New Zealand) describe environmental reporting in the cruise industry. The following chapter (29) by

Claire Ellis, Pascal Scherrer and Kaye Walker (Australia), examines the improving sustainable management of expedition cruise destinations through some governance and management lessons from the Great Barrier Reef, the Kimberley and Tasmanian regions of Australia. The third and final chapter in this part, Chapter 30 by Daniela

Liggett and Emma Stewart (New Zealand), addresses cruising in the Antarctic, its development, regulation and management.

 

Part 6: Ports, Destinations and Infrastructure Development

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Part 6 �Ports, Destinations and

Infrastructure Development

Part 5 examined the planning and management aspects of sustainable cruising in three chapters. This final part of the book, Part 6, investigates ports, destinations and infrastructure development in four chapters. In Chapter 31, Emad Monshi (Saudi Arabia) and Noel Scott (Australia) examine the development of cruise tourism in Saudi Arabia.

In Chapter 32, Marianna Sigala (Australia) describes cruise itinerary planning. These two chapters are followed by two more examining cruising in Asia, especially China.

In Chapter 33, Véronique Mondou (France) and Benjamin Taunay ask the question, is

China a new goldmine for cruise companies? In the following chapter (34), Ross

Dowling and Iris Mao (Australia) broaden the scope and examine cruising in Asia whilst still maintaining a focus on China.

Cunard Line’s Queen Mary 2 leaving the Port of Fremantle, Western Australia. This luxury resort ship is 148,528 t and is the largest ocean liner ever built. An ocean liner is a ship designed to transport passengers from point A to point B. In the case of QM2 it was

 

Part 7 Conclusions and Future Directions

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Part 7 �Conclusions and Future

Directions

Part 6 investigated ports, destinations and infrastructure development. Now the final single concluding chapter (35), by the editors of the book, brings it to a close with a summation of the preceding six parts, followed by some suggestions on the future directions of cruising.

Departing Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean, one of four overseas regions of France, on the Silversea Cruises luxury ship Silver Wind (17,400 t). (From: Ross Dowling.)

35

Conclusions and Future

Directions

Clare Weeden1* and Ross Dowling2

University of Brighton, Centre of Sport, Tourism and Leisure Studies

(CoSTALS), School of Sport and Service Management, Eastbourne, UK;

2

Edith Cowan University, School of Business and Law, Centre for

Innovative Practice, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia

1

Conclusions and Future Directions

Developments since 2006

Since the first edition of Cruise Ship Tourism (Dowling, 2006), much has changed in the development, management and also appeal of cruise ship tourism. The number of people cruising has more than doubled, from 10.6 million passengers in 2004, to more than 22.3 million in 2015. The size of ships has increased, from a high of 3500-passenger capacity in 2006, to vessels that now carry more than 6000 guests and 2500 crew. As discussed by several chapters in this volume, there has also been a tremendous growth in the number of ports and destination regions seeking to welcome ships of all sizes and styles, as well as an increase in source markets. Among the most notable of these is Australasia, which reached 1 million passengers in 2015, and China. This latter market is demonstrating remarkable growth, a more than 200% increase, from 1 million in

 

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