Make your own eBooks

Use our Remix App to mix & match content. In minutes make your own course packs, training bundles, custom travel guides, you name it. Even add your own title & cover.

Education
Research
Travel
Health

Slices & Articles Get by the slice or add to your own ebook

Medium 9781780643373

11: The Importance of Veteran Trees for Saproxylic Insects

Kirby, K.J.; Watkins, C. CABI PDF

11 

The Importance of Veteran Trees for Saproxylic Insects

Juha Siitonen1* and Thomas Ranius2

Natural Resources Institute Finland, Vantaa, Finland; 2Department of Ecology,

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden

1

11.1 Introduction

Old trees – often referred to as ancient or

­veteran – have always attracted attention, but recently there has been a revival of interest in them from an ecological and conservation perspective. Ancient trees are old individuals that have clearly passed beyond maturity and often show features such as cavities or hollow trunks, bark loss over sections of the trunk and a large quantity of dead wood in the canopy. The term

‘veteran tree’ includes younger individuals that have developed similar characteristics as a result of adverse growing conditions or injury (Woodland Trust, 2008; Lonsdale, 2013).

Veteran trees are defined as being of interest biologically, culturally or aesthetically because of their age, size or condition (Read, 2000).

A large old tree has been described as an arboreal megalopolis for saproxylic species

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874218442

2. Groups

Martha Sims Utah State University Press ePub

If folklore is a way of learning and a way of communicating, then there must be a group of people who need to communicate something to each other. Defining a folk group by how and what it communicates allows us to look at groups formed and maintained by informal means—those not constructed formally as groups by founders with particular rules and guidelines, but held together by the practices and expressions of their members. This is one of the tenets of folklore scholarship: that informal or unofficial shared knowledge is a defining feature of a folk group.

The concept of folk group has evolved radically over time. The early assumptions that folk groups were somehow different from the rest of us and were primarily rural, uneducated, or primitive yielded to the understanding that all of us share folklore every day. Folklorists established that we all belong to folk groups and that groups also exist in urban, contemporary settings (see, for instance, Dundes 1980). Today, digital technology provides extended opportunities for groups to form and communicate in new ways. A great deal of folklore research in recent years has focused on how online communities form and communicate and how they share traditions. This research has opened up new understanding of what groups are and what constitutes informal shared knowledge—folklore itself. Most importantly, the ability of people to come together online as groups and the complexity of online interactions demonstrate the dynamic process of sharing and creating folklore.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781935542698

Chapter Six: Implications of Mobile Learning

Rogers, Kipp D. Solution Tree Press PDF
Implications of Mobile Learning

Learning is quite personal. We all have learning-style preferences that are enhanced when learning is rigorous, engaging, and relevant. m-Learning promotes those aspects of learning for students, and for that reason, it represents the next stage in learning with technology. Although: technology by itself does not guarantee learning, when effectively used, it can help focus attention and maintain interest. To reiterate, mobile learning used with instruction has the following tangible benefits:•• Varied learning conditions—Using mobile learning can allow students to be immersed in virtual environments and to provide instances where they can master skills at their own pace and in places where they are most comfortable.•• Opportunities for collaboration—Mobile learning methodologies are best used as part of other learning strategies and when combined with group activities, paper-based materials, and traditional educational activities. Educators can use MLDs to promote one of the most important 21st century skills: working collaboratively. See All Chapters
Medium 9781910444092

CAPÍTULO DIECISEIS: Introyección, presencia psíquica y Estados del Yo Padre: consideraciones para la psicoterapia

Erskine, Richard G. Ediciones Karnac ePub

CAPÍTULO DIECISEIS

Introyección, presencia psíquica y Estados del Yo Padre: consideraciones para la psicoterapia

Durante un homenaje en memoria de Eric Berne, Franklin Ernst (1971) resaltó que la contribución más significativa de Berne a la profesión de la psicoterapia ha sido la identificación de los Estados del Yo Padre y su diferenciación de los Estados del Yo Adulto y Niño. Esta relevante diferenciación proporciona un marco teórico para el Análisis Transaccional clínico que sugiere un enfoque psicoterapéutico que puede aliviar muchas manifestaciones de ansiedad, depresión y baja autoestima derivadas de un conflicto intrapsíquico. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de la literatura del Análisis Transaccional clínico se ha centrado o bien en liberar los Estados del Yo Niño de una compulsión a adaptarse (fortaleciendo el control del Estado del Yo Adulto y reemplazando un mensaje introyectado dañino por un mensaje introyectado benigno) o en hacer cambios conductuales que faciliten las transacciones de “Estado del Yo” Adulto a “Estado del Yo” Adulto.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781628870725

2 BARCELONA & MADRID IN CONTEXT

Patricia Harris FrommerMedia ePub

2

barcelona & madrid in Context

Different as they are, Barcelona and Madrid are both products of a land that the rest of Europe once considered beyond the pale. One of the few things that the French and English used to agree on was that “Europe ends at the Pyrenees.” Those mountains kept Spain in splendid isolation, where it developed along its own path. Consequently, Spain has evolved customs, art, architecture, and even cuisine that owe as much to Islamic North Africa as to its onetime sister provinces of the Roman Empire. The country does not look like, sound like, or even taste like the rest of Europe. Nowhere else is quite as rich, or quite as demanding. When you go to Spain, you must surrender to Spain.

You must accept the rhythms of daily life—so unlike the rest of Europe—and think nothing of going to dinner after 10pm and then closing down the flamenco bar after the 3am final set. You must spend the evening in a seafront promenade, walking and talking and nodding at the other walkers and talkers. You must not be bashful about elbowing your way to the bar, pointing at the tapas to order, and having your fill. For that matter, you must resolve to eat something new every day that you would otherwise spurn: blood sausage, roast suckling pig, squid in their own ink. In many places, shops and museums close in the heat of the afternoon, and you must be patient and while away the hours with lunch in a cool, shady courtyard. Do all that, and you will be ready for everything Spain will throw at you.

See All Chapters

See All Slices