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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 18. The Pleasure Principle

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

I LEARNED TO KNIT IN FOURTH GRADE FROM MY GRANDMOTHER’S NEIGHBOR, MARION EPSTEIN (MANNY) AND FROM MRS. BROUGHTON, WHO WOULD TEACH US AFTER SCHOOL. EVER SINCE, KNITTING HAS SOOTHED MY SOUL. EVEN IN ART SCHOOL, I WOULD COME HOME FROM THE INTELLECTUAL RIGORS OF THE STUDIO AND CLIMB IN MY BED WITH SKEINS OF COLORFUL CHENILLE. I’D KNIT SCARVES AND READ MARTHA STEWART LIVING MAGAZINE LIKE IT WAS SOME FORBIDDEN PLEASURE. CRAFTING SEEMED LIKE A DIRTY SECRET TO ME THEN, BUT IT KEPT ME SANE IN THE IVORY TOWER.

“Let the beauty of what you love be what you do.”

RUMI

What makes you feel good? Why would you need to be reminded about seeking pleasure? We are all so good at that, right? No, not really. But you once were. And certainly you knew what made you happy as a child.

When was the last time you watched a seven-year-old, or a four-year-old, at play? I do every day. Here is what it looks like: they flit, they fly, they wander passionately from one creative enterprise to the next. Now playing with tiny plastic Littlest Pet Shop critters, now drawing, now LEGO, now back to Pet Shops, and on it goes. Constant desire. Constant movement. Constant momentum, even when they take breaks: Look! Here’s a roll of duct tape! Look! I can write my own comic book! Look! Ice cream! Pleasure, pleasure, pleasure the whole way through. Children seek pleasure at every turn. They don’t need reminders about how to play, how to have fun, or how to make room for themselves. They know what feels good.

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Medium 9781449359010

2. Packages and Help Pages

Garrett Grolemund O'Reilly Media ePub

You now have a function that simulates rolling a pair of dice. Let’s make things a little more interesting by weighting the dice in your favor. The house always wins, right? Let’s make the dice roll high numbers slightly more often than it rolls low numbers.

Before we weight the dice, we should make sure that they are fair to begin with. Two tools will help you do this: repetition and visualization. By coincidence, these tools are also two of the most useful superpowers in the world of data science.

We will repeat our dice rolls with a function called replicate, and we will visualize our rolls with a function called qplot. qplot does not come with R when you download it; qplot comes in a standalone R package. Many of the most useful R tools come in R packages, so let’s take a moment to look at what R packages are and how you can use them.

You’re not the only person writing your own functions with R. Many professors, programmers, and statisticians use R to design tools that can help people analyze data. They then make these tools free for anyone to use. To use these tools, you just have to download them. They come as preassembled collections of functions and objects called packages. Appendix B contains detailed instructions for downloading and updating R packages, but we’ll look at the basics here.

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Medium 9780253007414

CODA: Apprentices and Entrepreneurs Revisited: Twenty Years of Workshop Changes, 1987–2007

Kasfir, Sidney Littlefield ePub

Sidney Littlefield Kasfir

The original version of chapter 14 was prepared for a graduate seminar taught by John Picton at the School of Oriental and African Studies. It was further developed several years later for “The Artist and the Workshop in Traditional Africa,” a conference organized by Christopher Roy in 1985, and appeared in the 1987 The Artist and the Workshop in Traditional Africa as “Apprentices and Entrepreneurs: The Workshop and Style Uniformity in Subsaharan Africa.” It included comparisons of training and innovation among Akweya, Idoma, Ebira, Tiv, Kalabari, Dogon, Dan, Gola, Kulibele-Senufo, Maconde or Makonde, Yoruba, and Annang or Ibibio sculptors. The first five were chosen as examples of woodcarvers who learned their techniques and styles informally, without serving as apprentices to master carvers. The last seven went through apprenticeship systems of various kinds and were therefore trained by experienced members of their profession; some of these artists went on to set up their own individual practices, others were expected to join the kin- or ethnicity-based workshops or cooperatives where they apprenticed.

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Medium 9780253010186

2. The Political and Cultural Milieu

Lawrence Bennett Indiana University Press ePub

During the successive reigns of Leopold I (r. 1658–1705) and his sons, Joseph I (r. 1705–11) and Charles VI (r. 1711–40), the principles of dynastic power and absolute monarchy within the Habsburg Empire were essentially unchallenged.1 The old Habsburg dream of unifying the German Empire under one crown had been shattered by the Thirty Years’ War. The Treaty of Utrecht (1648) enabled each provincial German ruler to establish the religion of his convictions within his own boundaries and to emulate the absolutism already practiced successfully by the French monarchy.

Prepared for the priesthood and educated by the Jesuit Neidhart (Nitardi), Leopold was unexpectedly placed in the role of successor to his father, Ferdinand III, when his older brother, Ferdinand, died in 1654. Physically unattractive, deeply religious, disinclined to war, often halting and indecisive, Leopold formed a distinct contrast to his cousin, Louis XIV. Yet under his forty-seven-year rule—one of the longest in European history—the Habsburg Empire enjoyed one of its most brilliant epochs.

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Medium 9780253017697

4 Le Vigeant

Otto Schrag Indiana University Press ePub

Many were still asleep when the train stopped again. The doors were opened and a soldier shouted, “Descendez!

There was mass confusion as people scurried to get their belongings. Each wanted to get out quickly. But Licht took his time, slowly putting on his jacket, getting his rucksack on his back, and picking up his satchel. Then he climbed out of the car.

The train stood in an open field where a row of gorgeous acacia trees lined the tracks, their leaves shimmering with raindrops. The most wonderful thing was the air. Never in his life had Licht breathed anything like it. This was not ordinary air; it was an altogether unfamiliar thing, creating for him a heavenly sensation halfway between morning dew and a cool evening breeze. A great artist had lightly perfumed this intoxicating mix to further its enchantment.

Although Belgians still had the watch, French officers were about to take over. They looked puzzled as they saw their new charges, who had been described to them as dangerous prisoners.

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