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Medium 9780596806286

appendix: leftovers The Top Ten Things (we didn’t cover)

Jeff Siarto O'Reilly Media ePub

We’ve really covered a lot of ground in this book.

The thing is, there are some important topics and tidbits that didn’t quite fit into any of the previous chapters. We feel pretty strongly about this, and think that if we didn’t at least cover them in passing, we’d be doing you a disservice. That’s where this chapter comes into the picture. Well, it’s not really a chapter, it’s more like an appendix (OK, it is an appendix). But it’s an awesome appendix of the top ten best bits that we couldn’t let you go without.

Comments are an essential part of any online community or blog and WordPress makes it easy manage reader comments and deal with spam (unwanted comments often come from “bots” as well). Depending on your settings, comments are either automatically posted to your blog (unless they are spam) or held for moderation, which requires the site administrator to approve the comment before it gets posted on the live site.

One powerful feature of WordPress is its ability to import and migrate content (and much more) from other blogging platorms—including WordPress.com. WordPress.com is a “hosted” version of WordPress, similar to Blogger, that allows users to sign up and create a free blog online. You have a similar interface to the downloaded version of WordPress and your own URL, but it’s on the WordPress domain, like yourblog.wordpress.com. If you want to do custom themes, create your own plug-ins, and start working more with PHP, you’re going to outgrow the hosted service eventually. And once you do, you can export all your content and import it into your own WordPress installation, preserving posts, pages, settings and comments.

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Medium 9781615424115

Tame Multiple Pages with Tabs

Sharon Zardetto TidBITS Publishing, Inc. ePub

Window tabs are possibly the best thing since sliced bread. Come tothink of it, theyre sort of like sliced window.

Tabs let you keep multiple Web pages open in a single window; thisis especially useful on a laptop with limited screen real estate, but itkeeps window-juggling to a minimum on any screen. And tabs provide a convenient organizational tool: you can, for instance, have several windows open, each with a subset of related Web pages in tabs, when youre researching a topicwhether the topic is global warming or which wireless Bluetooth speaker youre thinking of ordering from Amazon.

Whether youve been using tabs all along, or are about to explore theirusefulness, set up your tab preferences. If you have no personal preferences, start with my recommendations:

1. Choose Safari > Preferences and click Tabs.

2. From the Open Pages in Tabs Instead of Windows pop-up menu, choose Automatically. This option is detailed in Override Window-Opening Links , ahead in this chapter.

3. Select the Command-Click Opens a Link in a New Tab checkbox. Enter the twenty-first century if youve been delayed; this is the standard for opening tabs. (See Tabs, Tabs, Everywhere to learn how this setting affects more than just links.)

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Medium 9781603440943

73 Tunicata (Urochordata) of the Gulf of Mexico

Texas A&M University Press PDF

73

Tunicata (Urochordata) of the Gulf of Mexico

Linda Cole and Gretchen Lambert

Tunicates, also called urochordates, are invertebrates that constitute a subphylum of the phylum Chordata. They exhibit a notochord (similar to our backbone) during their larval stage that shrinks to a simple ganglion during their adult stage in most tunicates. The name tunicate comes from the outer covering called the tunic that protects the animal from predation and physical damage.

All Tunicates are marine animals (no freshwater species recorded). Tunicates are being used for medicines and are a source of food in some countries. There are 4 classes of tunicates: Ascidiacea, Sorberacea, Thaliacea, and Appendicularia (the latter not included in this listing). The largest class, Ascidiacea, are benthic tunicates that attach to hard substrates such as docks, rocks, dead corals, mollusk shells, boat bottoms, and so forth, giving them the term “fouling animals.” Some species thrive living loosely attached to sand in the cold boreal current in Davis Strait between Greenland and Labrador. Others survive best lying loosely on sand in the warm Gulf Stream current, rich in tiny food particles, fanning northeastward from the Straits of Florida between the peninsula and the island of Cuba (Plough 1978). Tunicates are either solitary or colonial. Colonial forms consist of individuals (zooids) sharing a common tunic. They are filter feeders, meaning that they can filter nutrients from water currents. All zooids have 2 siphon openings, branchial (oral) and atrial.

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Medium 9781617140433

Chapter 2: From Wolverines To Tigers

Gerstner, Joanne ABDO PDF

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Medium 9781442229037

THE TRIUNE GOD AND THE PASSION OF CHRIST

Pro Ecclesia Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Gabriel Fackre

It has long been held that Jesus Christ in his human nature underwent the humiliation that happened on the road to Calvary and on the cross. Did the divine nature—Jesus as God—in some profound sense also participate in the back that was bloodied, the hands that were pierced, the cry of dereliction, and the death that Jesus died?

Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ is a study in this subject. Of course, it focuses on the suffering of the humanity of Christ. What else can a visualization of the passion do than show the human visibilities? And the portrayal of that follows the producer’s own spirituality: the “five sorrowful mysteries” of the rosary—“the agony of the Lord in the garden, his scourging, his crowning with thorns, the carrying of the cross to Calvary, the crucifixion”1 (Matt. 26:36–46, 27:26, 27:29, 27:31–32, 27:33–50), with their backdrop in the stations of the cross. Also formative of the film are the visions of the Venerables Mary of Agreda (1620–65) and Anne Catherine Emmerich (1774–82), the latter manifesting the stigmata.2 But there is more here than meets the eye. I want to explore a small hint in the film that pushes the passion to its deepest point—into the very heart of God.

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