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Medium 9781855751774

CHAPTER TWO. Beyond a mature concept of death

Slice ePub May 22, 2014

Thirteen-year-old Margaret told the hospital play specialist that

her cousin Virginia had said that she had only three days left to live.

* * *

Four-year-old Dina had two imaginary friends, Skimpy and Squonk, who went with her everywhere. As she helped Squonk into the car one day, Dina informed her mother that Skimpy had died.

These two children were suffering with life-threatening illnesses for which no cure was deemed possible. Their announcements occurred around the time the medical team had decided to stop active treatment and to transfer the child to palliative care. Children often discover their prognosis through their reading of the context and non-verbal communication, which includes the interpretations they make of others’ behaviour or of the roles of specific hospital staff and procedures. Margaret probably gleaned a lot of information about her health status from eavesdropping on adult conversations. Dina’s awareness of death was probably influenced by the contact that she had with other patients who were dying (Bluebond-Langner, 1978; Kendrick, Culling, Oakhill, & Mott, 1987). Usually the child initiates the conversation about death, perhaps in an attempt to establish who knows what, who is open to talk or tell, and whether it is acceptable to talk about death in this relationship. The child may also be conveying messages like, “I am aware of death, I know I am going to die, can you talk about it, can you manage it?”

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Medium 9781781609330

The Romanian Pavilion

Source: Art Nouveau
Slice ePub May 26, 2014

Medium 9780596002022

9. Groupchat, Components, and Event Models

Slice ePub May 27, 2014

By now, you should have a good idea of how scripts interact with Jabber and how the core elements such as <message/> and <presence/> can be constructed and handled.

This chapter builds upon what we've already seen in Chapter 8 and introduces new concepts. We build a nosy assistant that joins a conference room and alerts us to words and phrases that we want it to listen for. There are two popular conference protocols, as mentioned in Section 6.2.6the presence-based Groupchat protocol, and the jabber:iq:conference-based Conference protocol. The assistant recipe, a foray into the world of 'bots, takes a look at the original presence-based one.

As we've seen, programming within Jabber's event model is fairly straightforward. But what happens when you want to meld other components with event models of their own? We look at a couple of typical scenarios where this melding needs to happen. The first is a homage to the Trojan Room Coffee Machine (http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/coffee/coffee.html), where we give life, or at least presence, to a coffeepot, using LEGO MINDSTORMS. The second is a Tk-based RSS headline viewer. Both the coffeepot and the Tk programming library have event loops of their own. With the coffeepot, we need to have a loop that polls the coffeepot's status, independently of the polling for incoming packets from the Jabber server. The Tk programming library's event model is similar to those of the Jabber programming libraries that are used in the recipes in this book, in that handlers are set up and a loop is started that listens for UI events. In both cases, we need to get these event loops to work in harmony with the Jabber libraries' event loops.

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Medium 9781855755932

CHAPTER FOUR: What causes work addiction?

Slice ePub May 23, 2014

They intoxicate themselves with work so they won’t see how they really are.

(Aldous Huxley, quoted in Robinson, 1998a, p. 232)

Some people experience work addiction while others go through life without ever experiencing this. What makes some people develop workaholism? A number of experts have tried to answer this question. They have approached it from different angles and have studied different aspects of work addiction to find out what causes it. It turns out that several things come into play, and that different circumstances increase one’s risk of becoming addicted to work. This is why experts can give no single explanation for what causes an addiction to work. In this chapter, I take a closer look at some of the circumstances that determine whether a person develops this type of addic tion.

Personality

Several studies have been performed on the subject of work addiction. Most of these studies show that the phenomenon is closely related to personality. Researchers have discovered that certain characteristics are generally present in people who are workaholics. Work addiction, then, is explained as an expression of certain characteristics (McMillan, O’Driscoll, Marsh, &Brady, 2001).

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Medium 9781576752050

Common Calls 2

Slice ePub May 14, 2014

I FEEL LIKE I HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO DO GREAT THINGS. THIS [FEELING] CAME FROM MY FAMILY AND FROM TEACHERS.… I WANT TO BE PREPARED FOR IT.

John Stormer

Bay Area business leader

I THINK MY CALLING IS TO WORK WITH PEOPLE I LIKE AND TO MAKE GOOD THINGS HAPPEN.… I AM OMNIVOROUS, DRAWN TO ALMOST ANY PROJECT THAT PRESENTS A CHALLENGE AND INVOLVES WORKING WITH—OR MAYBE FOR—SOMEONE I LIKE.

Sandy Smith

Consultant and coach, Seattle

WE HAVE DESCRIBED CALLS and our response to them. Now, let’s be very practical and look at how calls work in our everyday lives.

Mother Teresa often talked about her calling to work with the poor. Before a meaning-filled train journey she had been a teacher; after she had a prayerful conversation with God on that trip, she changed her life mission and served the poor. Her life was one of the great modern examples of answering a call.

But for two reasons, in this book we will concentrate less on the inspiring examples like Mother Teresa, although we won’t ignore them. First, her life was very different from the lives of most of us who have normal family and work roles, kids or grandkids or aging parents, jobs we want to build into careers, and careers we want to be fulfilling. On top of that we have life maintenance chores—we buy groceries and make mortgage payments, cut the grass and clean the refrigerator. Mother Teresa, a shining portrait of a called life devoted to service, most likely had a lot of normal life activities too, but she is hard to relate to. Her life is saintly in the extreme.

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