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Medium 9780596519223

Nullable Types

Joseph Albahari O'Reilly Media ePub

Reference types can represent a nonexistent value with a null reference. Value types, however, cannot ordinarily represent null values. For example:

To represent null in a value type, you must use a special construct called a nullable type. A nullable type is denoted with a value type followed by the ? symbol:

T? translates into System.Nullable<T>. Nullable<T> is a light-weight immutable struct, having only two fields to represent Value and HasValue. The essence of System.Nullable<T> is very simple:

The code:

gets translated by the compiler to:

Attempting to retrieve Value when HasValue is false throws an InvalidOperationException. GetValueOrDefault() returns Value if HasValue is true; otherwise, it returns new T() or a specified a custom default value.

The default value of T? is null.

The conversion from T to T? is implicit, and from T? to T is explicit. For example:

The explicit cast is directly equivalent to calling the nullable object's Value property. Hence, if HasValue is false, an InvalidOperationException is thrown.

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Medium 9781576753750

SECRET #4: Engage the Customer’s Curiosity

Chip Bell Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

dish was a John Dory fish, pan-fried in a ravishing and unique combination of tropical fruits and spices.

“The fish was excellent,” one of us commented to our waiter as he brought the next course of delicacies. “What’s in that dish?”

“I think with some mango and mustard,” he responded in broken

English. We contemplated how we could learn more detail about this special delicacy. Minutes later our dreams were fulfilled.

The head chef appeared at our table with a copy of the cherished recipe. But our lesson did not stop there. He spent five minutes offering a few cautions, shortcuts, and embellishments. He even asked a waiter to bring over the bottle of the wine he used so we could see the label.

As he warmly bid us farewell to return to his kitchen we looked at each other in quiet amazement. Finally, one of us broke the silence: “We’ve all been to chef’s school!”

While “tutor me or lose me” is not yet the byword of today’s customer, their expectation that service providers be super smart has fast become a standard. Call center employees get dinged by customers much more quickly for inadequate knowledge than for rudeness. In fact, most people nowadays would rather have a surly expert than a polite idiot. What’s more, we want to become virtual experts ourselves.

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Medium 9781855755543

CHAPTER ONE: Social dreaming and the self

John Clare Karnac Books ePub

John Clare

“Freud democratised genius by giving everyone a creative unconscious.”

—Philip Rieff, 1987

The shared experience of Social Dreaming is quite unlike most other ways of having a conversation. This chapter is an attempt to describe the phenomenology of the matrix in order to understand what happens to the self in Social Dreaming. First I want to look at the connection between self experience and free association and to ask what we mean when we talk about being real or‘true to ourselves’. Then I will use the work of four psychoanalytical writers to elucidate the freedom and aliveness of mind, and its relation to the social, which is typical of the social dreaming matrix.

People often dream about trains and train journeys. Freud invited his patients, when they were embarking on psychoanalysis, to tell him whatever came into their heads, no matter how trivial orembarrassing. He suggested they imagined a train journey where they looked out of the window and reported to their analyst everything they saw as the world flew past, even the smallest things.

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Medium 9781604537116

New Opportunities

Sarah Tieck Big Buddy Books PDF
Medium 9781617836671

On to Nascar

Matt Scheff SportsZone PDF

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