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Medium 9780596559045

Get Hibernate

James Elliott O'Reilly Media PDF

Figure 1. Latest stable version link on the HSQLDB home page

mirror and download the ZIP archive. There’s nothing to install or configure; I’ll show you how to use it right after you get Hibernate, which is the next step.

Alternatives

What if you want to use MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle, DB2, Sybase, Informix, or some other common database? Don’t worry, Hibernate can work with all these and others. (We’ll talk about how you specify “dialects” for different databases later on.)

And if you really want, you can try to figure out how to work with your favorite from the start, but it will mean extra work for you in following along with the examples, and you’ll miss out on a great opportunity to discover HSQLDB.

Get Hibernate

Here we go, preliminaries accomplished, time for the main event! Downloading Hibernate is a lot like downloading HSQLDB…or any other free, open source Java package. Start with the Hibernate home page at http://hibernate.org/and find the

Download link, which is again on the lefthand side in Figure 2.

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Medium 9781622500222

Context Clues: Definition

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

CONTEXT CLUES: Definition

Sometimes the context will give you the definition of a word. For example, do you know what an “echinoderm” is? You can find its definition in the following sentence: A starfish is an echinoderm, an animal with spiny skin.

A. Underline the words in each item below that are clues to the meaning of the boldfaced word. The first one has been done for you.

1.

Mollusks, or soft-bodied animals, include clams, squid, and slugs.

2. Jill is bilingual, able to speak two languages.

3. The neighbors painted their house ocher, a dark yellow color.

4. The chef prepared a salad of alligator pear, also known as avocado.

5. Sam was bankrupt. In other words, he was unable to pay his debts.

B. Read the paragraph for context clues. Then write the meaning of each boldfaced word.

Some animals go through a metamorphosis, or complete change, during their life cycle. A baby frog, called a tadpole, grows legs and develops lungs as it becomes an adult frog. A butterfly begins its life as a caterpillar, a hairy worm. Soon its body forms a hard shell known as a cocoon. Inside this cocoon the caterpillar changes into a butterfly.

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Medium 9781771870726

School Days

McKinnon, Neil Thistledown Press ePub

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WE HAD STOPPED FOR LUNCH AT a small restaurant near Plaza Bugambillias. I blocked out Adriana’s prattle by concentrating my attention on three pictures hanging in the centre of the white stucco wall: a faded print of a marching school band, a watercolour of an old boat tied to the pier at the end of the malecon and a recent photo of the owner’s wife preparing a culinary masterpiece in a cluttered kitchen. Faded red flowers stencilled onto a painted green vine surrounded the pictures and then rambled around a door, open to a private dining area in the rear of the restaurant.

Adriana’s voice rose to blur the pictures. “You are like a puppy that outruns its own legs,” she said. “You’re way ahead of yourself and you’re about to fall flat on your face.”

“What do you mean, oh faded flower of painted pulchritude?”

“You have already informed your reader, should you be so fortunate as to get one, how you sneaked up the backstairs on your first visit to a cathedral. You have said little of what went before. What of your days in school? You must enlighten us on how someone can spend his entire youth getting educated and still learn nothing.”

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Medium 9781855757905

8 - Trauma

Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER 8

Trauma

Joanne Stubley

My aims in this chapter are twofold. First, I consider how a brief series of consultations might be of value for individuals who present with trauma. Second, I discuss how the psychological effects of trauma yield insights into the workings of the mind. Such insights are relevant for therapeutic work beyond that with traumatized patients.

I begin with a clinical description, but not of someone who came for consultation.

A person's story of trauma

A young college student, walking through a park on the way home from a party, is brutally raped. In the following weeks two other women are attacked in a similar manner, but they lose their lives at the hands of their attacker. The college student experiences post-traumatic stress reactions in the form of nightmares, flashbacks, difficulty sleeping, feelings of isolation and distance from friends and family, emotional numbness, and withdrawal.

Unable to return to classes, the student leaves college and returns home. There she finds it difficult to speak about her experiences. She finds herself embroiled in pointless arguments and disputes within the family. She breaks up with her former boyfriend and sees many of her old friends drift away. Eventually she begins to pick up the pieces of her life, restarting college in another town.

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Medium 9781855759787

CHAPTER FOUR. Dreams, symbolic impoverishment, and the question of the other

Rosine J. Perelberg Karnac Books ePub

Gregorio Kohon

I

The knowledge with which psychoanalytic enterprise is concerned refers to a truth that is always unwelcome. It is unwelcome mainly because it is unconscious and does not depend on the will, or on the wishes of the subject. Patient and analyst get involved in a rather peculiar dialogue, in which both hope to be able to investigate and to question the symptom, the complaints, or the patient’s predicament. At any event, the truth about the patient will appear where it is least expected. In this sense, it will surprise the analyst as much as the patient. The patient is invited to feel free to think and speak without inhibitions—no limitations are imposed upon him by the analyst. Whatever comes to mind can be thought and said, and there is a more or less explicit agreement established between patient and analyst that certain feelings and fantasies will not be put into action. Murderous feelings or violent fantasies, for example, will be dreamt or uttered, not realized in action.

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