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Medium 9781780422978

LUNCHEON ON THE GRASS

Source: Claude Monet
Slice PDF May 26, 2014

36.

LUNCHEON

ON THE GRASS

1866.

Oil on canvas. 130 x 181 cm.

Signed and dated, bottom left:

Claude Monet 66.

The Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow.

Inventory No. 3307. W., I, 62.

mainly in the summer of 1865. The present canvas was painted a year later.

In 1963 and 1973 the Moscow painting was subjected to

X-ray and spectrum analyses which demonstrated that the artist’s signature and date, 1866, were contemporaneous with the rest of the painting. The radiographs also make it possible to trace the main stages in Monet’s work and see that many of the figures were repainted as the artist sought to achieve a greater compositional unity. The comparison of the radiographs of the present painting with those of the sections of the larger work now in Paris, painted in 1865-1866, supports the view that the Moscow canvas was executed later and is a replica of

n 1865, in the countryside near Paris, Monet worked on

Luncheon on the Grass, a large canvas apparently inspired

reduced size.

The different technique of the two works further

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Medium 9781782200956

53 - Joanne Lee Suicide Pact: The Comfort of Strangers

Slice ePub May 24, 2014

Why two people who did not know each other might have joined up to kill themselves

The message posted on an internet suicide forum read: “I haven't the strength to do this alone. I'm not a cop, a cannibal, or a murderer, just desperate. I have all the ingredients and want to do it ASAP.” It was written by thirty-four-year-old Joanne Lee who was found dead in a car this week on the industrial estate where she lived with her parents in Braintree, Essex.

With her was Steve Lumb, a lorry driver who had driven two hundred miles from his home in Sowerby, West Yorkshire, to join her in suicide. It is believed that they met for the first time only hours before they gassed themselves to death with a chemical cocktail that Lee had learned how to produce from the same internet site.

According to their families, there were few apparent signs that either Lee or Lumb were suicidal.

Lumb's father, with whom he lived, said of his son: “There was no depression and he never talked about taking his own life. He was a lovely lad.” This was despite his mother's death two-and-a-half years ago. “I thought he had got over that,” said his father, “everything seemed all right”.

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Medium 9781855755925

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: The de-being of the analyst

Slice ePub May 23, 2014

Freud, during his final period, refers to the Symposium once again in Beyond the Pleasure Principle, in relation to his theory of the union between Eros and the death drive, undermining the idea that the Symposium is merely a precursor of Christian asceticism (p. 58, note 1).2 His references to Socrates, although few in number, give us a sense of a continuity between Socrates and the analyst. In both cases, the signifier of death is at play in the definition of desire: Freud’s “realism” does not hide from us his conception that death is the master signifier of analysis. Just as what lies beyond the phenomena of repetition can be considered as a good criterion for the end of analysis, it would also be reasonable to ask what is the relation between two different concepts of death, or rather, of life. One of them tends towards inertia and repetition, and the other towards death as the principle of an erratic and metonymic desire, a desire for “something else”.

A life whose meaning is not ultimately determined by death is, in Freud’s opinion, of no more interest than, in Goethe’s words, “a succession of fair days” (cited by Freud in Civilization and its Discontents, p. 76). The desire for immortality that characterizes obsessional neurosis is a desire for death, since, according to Lacan, the obsessional identifies with the dead master (see Écrits, p. 258). Certain texts of Freud’s about death lend support to the theory that there is a strong affinity between neurotic repression and the negation of death.

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Medium 9781615423934

Learn Search Basics

Slice ePub May 27, 2014

You probably already know enough of the basic basics because if youve had your Mac for more than a few weeks, youve had to look for some file or another already. But sometimes the basics include unfamiliar terminology and the fine points, such as what makes a word a word in Spotlights estimation.

You can continue to ignore the basics and get along fine. Or, you can learn them and get along much better.

Theres not a lot of jargon when it comes to searching for things on your Mac, but knowing the terms that are used makes everything else more understandable:

Search field: This is the area where you type what youre looking for. The one in the Spotlight menu is often referred to as the Spotlight search field, or the Spotlight field, even though the search field in a Finder window is also Spotlight-driven ( Figure 5 ).

Figure 5: Left: An empty but activated (by a click) search field. Right: With text entered, the field gets a Cancel button so you can quickly erase the entry and cancel the search.

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Medium 9781622500239

Standardized Test Practice: Graphic Aids

Slice PDF January 13, 2001

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

STANDARDIZED TEST PRACTICE: Graphic Aids

Some tests may ask you to interpret data from charts, tables, graphs, diagrams, and maps.

A. Fill in a bubble to answer each question below. Hint: When asked

to draw conclusions, look at each answer choice. Try to find data that supports, or does not support, each choice.

DIRECTIONS: Use the table below to help you answer the questions.

IndiviDual Batting Averages

Player

Average

At Bats

Runs

Walt Wilson

Clem Carlson

Bud Bickerson

Jack Jackson

.323

.278

.278

.172

650

212

486

209

99

15

57

26

Hits Home Runs Runs Batted In

210

59

135

36

34

2

5

1

114

22

43

15

1. Which batter scored the most runs for his team? a. ❍ Wilson

b. ❍ Carlson

c. ❍ Bickerson

d. ❍ Jackson

2. Which player came up to bat the most times? a. ❍ Wilson

b. ❍ Carlson

c. ❍ Bickerson

d. ❍ Jackson

3. Which conclusion can be drawn from the information in this table?

❍ Jackson was probably injured. a.

❍ Carlson and Bickerson are about the same age. b.

❍ Wilson is the most experienced player. c.

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